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  • #16
    Originally posted by AJ6stringsting View Post
    Hardly anyone ever puts articles about efficiency issues to increase the values of practice ....
    Thanks for checking it out AJ!

    **********

    "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
    - George Carlin

    "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
    - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

    "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
    - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

    Comment


    • #17
      As someone mentioned the phone thing is a big pain.
      "Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello"

      Comment


      • #18
        I have to say, at first, I was like, hell yes we need to get serious and use these suggestions...

        Then, I thought back to a recent band I was in that did actually follow those rules, not literally, but for the most part, the same rules.

        It was a Rush tribute band, and I LOVED the music, but hated the band. Everyone was incredibly talented, maybe even gifted.

        The issues were, (not in any particular order):

        The guys seemed too serious, conversation was uncomfortable and awkward. No personal meshing
        No alcohol, the room needed to loosen up, I needed to loosen up, and had no method to do so
        Stress, knowing every little mistake I make would be noticed, recorded, and evaulated later. I made FAR more mistakes just because of the reasons above combined with the dirty looks every time a mistake happened.

        When they kicked me out, for not being good enough, I was relived as much as disappointed.. I really can play the material note for note, and can mimic most of the tones pretty well, I have the talent and the gear, but it dawned on me...

        The drummer in my cover band is laid back, yet a total rush fan, and we often break into various Rush songs on a whim, and I don't make the same mistakes, I'm laid back, and nailing it. That's the difference.

        Nothing wrong with some structure, but writing a rulebook, especially when nobody knows each other well or at all, is a recipe for disaster.

        It's worth noting that these guys who formed that Tribute, that they failed over and over and over to successfully launch anything. When I joined up with them, it was about revision #5 or so, I'm told that they are past 10 at this point. Sure, they were d-bags, but in a rule-oriented, way too serious kind of way. Talent is great, but wasted if you can't lighten up and make the experience enjoyable for the other players in your group.
        Epihpone LP and Dot.
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        (Loaner) Viking Pillager 60w combo (best amp in the friggin world!)
        Blackstar Stage-100 Head, 2x12 Blackstar Cab
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        Pedals, pedals, and more pedals. Favs include Strymon Mobius, MXR Super Badass, Digitech Supernatural Reverb, Xotic BB, MXR Carbon Copy.-

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post
          Thanks for checking the article out folks!
          I just discovered this.

          Last year I gave up being in gigging bands for good because of stuff like that. Well, except for one caveat: I will be the BL of my next band. However, I can't do that until I get my rehearsal space completed (really, my large garage, which will be used, among other things, as a rehearsal space). And when I do, that article is going on the wall and being handed out to band members.

          It lays it all out, and effectively so. Thank you.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Kramerguy View Post
            I have to say, at first, I was like, hell yes we need to get serious and use these suggestions...

            Then, I thought back to a recent band I was in that did actually follow those rules, not literally, but for the most part, the same rules.

            It was a Rush tribute band, and I LOVED the music, but hated the band. Everyone was incredibly talented, maybe even gifted.

            The issues were, (not in any particular order):

            The guys seemed too serious, conversation was uncomfortable and awkward. No personal meshing
            No alcohol, the room needed to loosen up, I needed to loosen up, and had no method to do so
            Stress, knowing every little mistake I make would be noticed, recorded, and evaulated later. I made FAR more mistakes just because of the reasons above combined with the dirty looks every time a mistake happened.

            When they kicked me out, for not being good enough, I was relived as much as disappointed.. I really can play the material note for note, and can mimic most of the tones pretty well, I have the talent and the gear, but it dawned on me...

            The drummer in my cover band is laid back, yet a total rush fan, and we often break into various Rush songs on a whim, and I don't make the same mistakes, I'm laid back, and nailing it. That's the difference.

            Nothing wrong with some structure, but writing a rulebook, especially when nobody knows each other well or at all, is a recipe for disaster.

            It's worth noting that these guys who formed that Tribute, that they failed over and over and over to successfully launch anything. When I joined up with them, it was about revision #5 or so, I'm told that they are past 10 at this point. Sure, they were d-bags, but in a rule-oriented, way too serious kind of way. Talent is great, but wasted if you can't lighten up and make the experience enjoyable for the other players in your group.
            After reading your post, I don't think the problem with that band was the use of those kinds of rules, but the execution of those rules. The line that really jumped out at me was this one:
            "... the dirty looks every time a mistake happened."

            That is an attitude problem. People can be serious, but still forgiving. Well, unless you just really suck.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Easy Listener View Post

              After reading your post, I don't think the problem with that band was the use of those kinds of rules, but the execution of those rules. The line that really jumped out at me was this one:
              "... the dirty looks every time a mistake happened."

              That is an attitude problem. People can be serious, but still forgiving. Well, unless you just really suck.

              Rule #1: Music is supposed to be fun & enjoyable.

              I know I mention that last in the article, but it really should be the first rule. If you're not getting that part right, none of the rest really matters very much IMO. But there's a balance that should be maintained. Things can be too strict, serious, and judgmental (which can kill all the fun and enjoyment), but they can also be too loose, flippant, and carefree to the point of being careless - and that doesn't work very well either.

              There seem to be more bands that are lazy and loose than bands that are too strict and serious, at least from my experiences. YMMV on that, but I do think it's important to try to find a good balance that works for everyone.
              **********

              "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
              - George Carlin

              "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
              - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

              "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
              - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post


                Rule #1: Music is supposed to be fun & enjoyable.

                I know I mention that last in the article, but it really should be the first rule. If you're not getting that part right, none of the rest really matters very much IMO. But there's a balance that should be maintained. Things can be too strict, serious, and judgmental (which can kill all the fun and enjoyment), but they can also be too loose, flippant, and carefree to the point of being careless - and that doesn't work very well either.

                There seem to be more bands that are lazy and loose than bands that are too strict and serious, at least from my experiences. YMMV on that, but I do think it's important to try to find a good balance that works for everyone.
                This is why I just stopped gigging. It wasn't fun. I'm certainly not in it for the money so if it isn't fun, there is just no point. And it wasn't fun because the bands I was in were mind bogglingly poorly managed. They were "good enough to get gigs". I want to be better than that. It takes at least SOME serious rehearsal, but we can still have fun.

                Comment


                • #23
                  I start with the assumption that everyone's gigging experiences will vary. Each circuit has its own expectations. What's really bothered me recently is that too often, guys don't want to have an initial face time session to see what those differences are so the new guy(s) can decide whether or not they can deal with them. I'm not willing to spend a lot of time getting up to speed on your project only to find out there were major obstacles that I thought should have been easy to recognize.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by senorblues View Post
                    I start with the assumption that everyone's gigging experiences will vary. Each circuit has its own expectations. What's really bothered me recently is that too often, guys don't want to have an initial face time session to see what those differences are so the new guy(s) can decide whether or not they can deal with them. I'm not willing to spend a lot of time getting up to speed on your project only to find out there were major obstacles that I thought should have been easy to recognize.
                    The Facetime meeting idea is a good one IMO.
                    **********

                    "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
                    - George Carlin

                    "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
                    - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                    "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
                    - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

                    Comment

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