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Does more gear equal more talent?

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  • #31
    No doubt there have always been folks who've collected lots of guitars, amps and effects for whatever reason. But I feel like it's only been fairly recently that so many beginner and amateur players have really felt the need to collect lots of gear. Maybe it's because we've become more of a consumeristic society, or maybe it's the proliferation of the internet and the accessibility of cheaper, decent quality instruments. But when I was coming up as a musician in my teens and twenties, most of the best players I knew only had a few guitars. Usually a primary, back-up, maybe one for an alternate tuning, and an acoustic. They weren't worried about genres or getting tons of different tones. They just made what they had work for them through hard work and practice. And I'm not talking about ancient history, this was just the 90's.

    As we've all gotten older, some of those same guys have accumulated collections, but it has nothing to do with them becoming better or worse players. It's typically because their incomes have increased. Also, when you play for a long time, you tend to accumulate stuff, sometimes inadvertently.

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    • #32
      Well, I've got seven working guitars at the moment, plus a bass, an acoustic and a piano synth. Two are in the building stages. Honestly, I feel my collection as it is encompasses all the styles I want to learn right now, and I'm focusing on doing just that. As for amps, I got a big one and a small one. Big one's for jamming at home, smaller one is for gigs (seems counter-intuitive, but for the kinds of venues I play -mostly house parties as entertainment- it's all I really need) and one multi-effects. I still GAS for stuff, but often don't buy it because I can't justify it.

      As for my friend/jam-buddy, he generally buys gear dependent on what I have. For instance, I got myself an Ibanez for my 18th birthday. A few weeks later, he bought one. I bought a big amp, he bought a bigger one and so on. Most recent incident is that I've been slowly custom-building a Jackson RR3 copy from GFS, and now he's looking to buy a Jackson RR3.

      Thanks for all the responses, guys. They have been most intriguing. I feel that I may or already have overcome that flaw in my perception; a flaw that tells me I need a particular guitar to properly learn a particular style.
      Originally Posted by Fork Man


      The answer is, of course, onions.









      Originally Posted by MyNameIsMok...


      Blasphemer! I'll bite your nipples off.









      Originally Posted by nicholai


      All guitars suck. Except for mine. They rock.

      Comment


      • #33
        Oh... Perhaps I should state for the record that I started playing in 1997. When my first guitar died in '03, I replaced it. At that point, it was six years before I bought any more guitars.
        Originally Posted by Fork Man


        The answer is, of course, onions.









        Originally Posted by MyNameIsMok...


        Blasphemer! I'll bite your nipples off.









        Originally Posted by nicholai


        All guitars suck. Except for mine. They rock.

        Comment


        • #34
          You need four guitars for a jam?

          Do you record? I do, and I'm lucky if three months later if I remember if I used a humbucker or a neck pickup on a rhythm part.
          Electrics: Fender '73 Mustang RI, Epiphone Inspired by John Lennon Casino, Gibson 60s Tribute Les Paul Studio, Daisy Rock Retro-H Deluxe, Squier Hello Kitty Strat x2Acoustics: Taylor 316CE-LTD, Seagull Entourage Rustic CW QITBasses: Squier Badtz Maru Bronco Bass, Aria CSB-300, Fender Mustang Bass RIAmps: Vox TB18C1, Vox Pathfinder 210, Peavey Transtube Envoy, Ampeg Micro VR StackMy Band: http://mittensband.com

          Comment


          • #35
            You need four guitars for a jam?

            Do you record? I do, and I'm lucky if three months later if I remember if I used a humbucker or a neck pickup on a rhythm part.


            We sometimes record our jams, yeah. Depends entirely on what we're jamming as to what guitar I use. But I probably don't need four. For bluesy or clean stuff, I like to use the CVish Strat. For heavy rhythms, the Washburn or the Ibanez and for soloing, the oddball. I could probably get by on just the Strat and the oddball.
            Originally Posted by Fork Man


            The answer is, of course, onions.









            Originally Posted by MyNameIsMok...


            Blasphemer! I'll bite your nipples off.









            Originally Posted by nicholai


            All guitars suck. Except for mine. They rock.

            Comment


            • #36
              No, all you need is a boost pedal. Try playing the "wrong" guitar. You'll find it to be fun and you'll also find that you still sound fine.
              Electrics: Fender '73 Mustang RI, Epiphone Inspired by John Lennon Casino, Gibson 60s Tribute Les Paul Studio, Daisy Rock Retro-H Deluxe, Squier Hello Kitty Strat x2Acoustics: Taylor 316CE-LTD, Seagull Entourage Rustic CW QITBasses: Squier Badtz Maru Bronco Bass, Aria CSB-300, Fender Mustang Bass RIAmps: Vox TB18C1, Vox Pathfinder 210, Peavey Transtube Envoy, Ampeg Micro VR StackMy Band: http://mittensband.com

              Comment


              • #37
                I've seen some people with the nicest gear imaginable that sounded like absolute crap.

                Good gear is pointless if you don't know how to use it.
                Last edited by MrKnobs : Today at 4:43PM.

                G&L Legacy
                Schecter C1 w/ EMGs
                Les Paul Studio w/ BB Pros
                Mesa Boogie Mark IVa
                Mesa 2x12 w/ 90 watt Black Shadows
                Calvin Klein underwear

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                • #38
                  Eh, no reason to put that much thought into it. Some people are really inspired by having or acquiring more and better gear - nicer guitars, big amps, a huge effects board - and likely play better as a result. Others, myself included, are just fine practicing 'naked'. How somebody else chooses to play is no skin off my nose - I just do what inspires me.


                  +1

                  By the same token, use the gear you like - not what's "proper" for the genre. One of my peeves, are mindsets such as:

                  Teles are only good for country, blues, or classic rock

                  Gretsches only sound good for rockabilly

                  Ibanez RGs should only be used for shredding


                  With the above mindsets in mind - then Jimi had no right playing a Strat, since at the time he came on the scene (1966 & 67), Strats were only considered to be good for surf guitar. Ditto for the Jazzmasters and Jaguars that so many indie players play nowadays.
                  Guitars I Have (and Play)

                  Gretsch G6119-1962FT Tennessee Rose

                  2006 Mapleglo Rickenbacker 360

                  2012 Fender Esquire

                  2012 Squier Modified Jaguar - not the humbucker one, the traditional one

                  Guild D125-12, 12-string acoustic


                  Amps

                  Early 90s Teal Stripe Peavey Bandit (the earliest Transtube Peavey)

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    No, all you need is a boost pedal. Try playing the "wrong" guitar. You'll find it to be fun and you'll also find that you still sound fine.


                    A boost pedal being for gain? What it really comes down to is that I don't have any low-output humbuckers. They're all screamers. The Washburn has a coil-tap, but it's still quite high output. My singles are all very low-output, but they can scream if necessary.
                    Originally Posted by Fork Man


                    The answer is, of course, onions.









                    Originally Posted by MyNameIsMok...


                    Blasphemer! I'll bite your nipples off.









                    Originally Posted by nicholai


                    All guitars suck. Except for mine. They rock.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      +1

                      By the same token, use the gear you like - not what's "proper" for the genre. One of my peeves, are mindsets such as:

                      Teles are only good for country, blues, or classic rock

                      Gretsches only sound good for rockabilly

                      Ibanez RGs should only be used for shredding


                      With the above mindsets in mind - then Jimi had no right playing a Strat, since at the time he came on the scene (1966 & 67), Strats were only considered to be good for surf guitar. Ditto for the Jazzmasters and Jaguars that so many indie players play nowadays.


                      Personally, I think Strats are good for everything

                      With regard to my own guitars, my RG isn't good for much outside of metal and rock. I keep it downtuned with very hot pups. It's a beast, and for a blistering blues solo it does pretty well. For anything else, the volume has to be rolled back quite a bit and I usually get drowned out by Mr. "my gear is expensive, therefore better", which wouldn't be so bad if he were able to keep good time.
                      Originally Posted by Fork Man


                      The answer is, of course, onions.









                      Originally Posted by MyNameIsMok...


                      Blasphemer! I'll bite your nipples off.









                      Originally Posted by nicholai


                      All guitars suck. Except for mine. They rock.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Funny he keeps "forgetting" to present clips to you.

                        He can't hide his flawed logic on tape no matter how much distortion or reverb he uses.

                        If he plays like a hack,, he will sound like a hack.

                        "You´╗┐ people keep on raining. I'll still be the parade." - Diamond Dave.



                        TO HEAR MY COUNTRY BAND: ADRIAN RAY, click THIS or this


                        Official endorsee of:Breedlove Guitars

                        http://www.ghsstrings.com

                        http://www.rocktron.com

                        http://www.monsterenergy.com/

                        Myspace.com-Dave Aronow

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                        • #42
                          I put very hot pickups in my bandmate's guitar (ceramic 16.9k bridge, 8.3 neck). We play soft indie pop music, the guitar changes hands between two girls who largely strum large open chords. Sounds absolutely fine through a Vox Pathfinder.

                          Hot pickups clean up very well in my experience, as long as you have a good guitar, amp, and sensible controls.
                          Electrics: Fender '73 Mustang RI, Epiphone Inspired by John Lennon Casino, Gibson 60s Tribute Les Paul Studio, Daisy Rock Retro-H Deluxe, Squier Hello Kitty Strat x2Acoustics: Taylor 316CE-LTD, Seagull Entourage Rustic CW QITBasses: Squier Badtz Maru Bronco Bass, Aria CSB-300, Fender Mustang Bass RIAmps: Vox TB18C1, Vox Pathfinder 210, Peavey Transtube Envoy, Ampeg Micro VR StackMy Band: http://mittensband.com

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            I put very hot pickups in my bandmate's guitar (ceramic 16.9k bridge, 8.3 neck). We play soft indie pop music, the guitar changes hands between two girls who largely strum large open chords. Sounds absolutely fine through a Vox Pathfinder.

                            Hot pickups clean up very well in my experience, as long as you have a good guitar, amp, and sensible controls.


                            I have to admit, I'm not great at reigning in the power of my Ibanez. Like I said, for metal and rock work, it's a real beast. For anything that requires a more gentle touch, I defer to one of the Strats because the singlecoils are far easier for me to manage. For soloing, the oddball with Gibson pups is great because it kicks out the exact tone I'm looking for in lead work. In the bridge position, it sounds more like a Super/Fat Strat. So in that respect, I suppose it could become my all-rounder blues-rock guitar. And played clean in the middle position, it sounds a bit like a Telecaster neck pup.

                            Also, I'm in the market for a backup/travel multi-effects. My dad's currently selling off a Line6 POD which he'll throw my way on the cheap. In your opinion, would I benefit from having one of these to play with?
                            Originally Posted by Fork Man


                            The answer is, of course, onions.









                            Originally Posted by MyNameIsMok...


                            Blasphemer! I'll bite your nipples off.









                            Originally Posted by nicholai


                            All guitars suck. Except for mine. They rock.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Talent is solely possessed by the player and has nothing to do with gear. What the player does with the gear reveals talent.
                              HCGB Trooper #24

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                So why are you so mad at the guy? Do you think he's going around the internet saying he's better than you?

                                My experience is that excellent guitarists usually have decent to awesome gear, whereas hacks can have anything from crap to ridiculously expensive rigs. You can always smell crap, no matter how much gain or chorus is on there.

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