Jump to content

Guitarists and producers.


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 52
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Members
Guitar tone comes from the guitarist' date=' and is usually discernible regardless of the quality of the production.[/quote']

 

There’s a certain amount of truth to this. Think Chess Records or those old Paramount field recordings. The tone shines through the lack of production. Chess did have that great room sound, however.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

 

Finally, I would pose this question: Can you name a single album that has gone platinum that was really poorly produced?

 

I don't know if it went platinum (actually, I doubt it), but 'The Holy Bible' by Manic Street Preachers was quite deliberately recorded in a badly equipped studio and produced 'badly'. This was one of te things that pardoxically made it such a success.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One word: Motown

 

 

**drops Mic**

 

You should have held on to the mic long enough to explain what you meant by this comment. :lol:

 

Is Motown (IYO) an example of a great guitarist with a so-so producer, or the other way around? :confused2:

 

Or did you have something else in mind? :idk:

 

 

 

 

PS Producers hate it when you drop the mic. Engineers even more so. :cop: That's one fad I can't wait to see disappear.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

You should have held on to the mic long enough to explain what you meant by this comment. :lol:

 

Is Motown (IYO) an example of a great guitarist with a so-so producer, or the other way around? :confused2:

 

Or did you have something else in mind? :idk:

 

 

 

 

PS Producers hate it when you drop the mic. Engineers even more so. :cop: That's one fad I can't wait to see disappear.

 

It was meant as an example of great song writing and performed with passion with marginal engineering/production.

 

as for the Mic drop. If you ever heard me sing, You'll be screaming for me to drop the mic

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

It was meant as an example of great song writing and performed with passion with marginal engineering/production.

 

Yes-the song OWNS the means of production:) !! )

 

That being said it is worth the Price of Admission

 

just to Snap your Fingers in the Reverb Chamber

 

at The Motown Museum !! )

 

:snap:

 

:)

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
A thought occurred to me today while I was at work listening to a rather uninspired guitar solo with a great tone. Which is better' date=' a mediocre guitarist with a great producer who can get the best performance and tone from him/her, or a great guitarist with a mediocre producer?[/quote']

 

What is better is whichever version results in a guitar performance that makes the song better. Sometimes that's a great guitarist that overcomes his producer, and sometimes a great producer that squeezes that last drop out of a mediocre guitar player.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

If I want to make money, I'll take the great production of a mediocre song every day, The airwaves are littered with well-produced dreck, while there are tons of great songs that never saw the light of day because the production didn't make the song go anywhere.

 

Don't believe me? I have one shining example of well-produced shlock that made a ton of money: Vanilla Ice. Second exhibit - Van Halen.

 

I would also submit for your thought experiment the majority of 3:30 country songs coming out of Nashville. For every really good songwriter, there are 10 weak ones who manage to fill out the cuts on a top-tier album....and they make money doing it. You can't take anything away from the Nashville studio circuit - those guys are as good as it gets anywhere on the planet, and it is their talent and skill that drives the Nashville money machine. JMO, YMMV.

 

On the other end, I would point out that while Elton John and Billy Joel are fantastic songwriters (Scenes from an Italian Restaurant, Funeral for a Friend / Love Lies Bleeding). they wouldn't have had a career without great producers turning their piano-bar songs into complete orchestral works. Again, JMO, YMMV.

 

Finally, I would pose this question: Can you name a single album that has gone platinum that was really poorly produced?

 

Nebraska?

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

You should have held on to the mic long enough to explain what you meant by this comment. :lol:

 

Is Motown (IYO) an example of a great guitarist with a so-so producer, or the other way around? :confused2:

 

Or did you have something else in mind? :idk:

 

 

 

 

PS Producers hate it when you drop the mic. Engineers even more so. :cop: That's one fad I can't wait to see disappear.

 

For similar reasons, one of my favorite songs is John Haitt's "Perfectly Good Guitar".

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

For similar reasons, one of my favorite songs is John Haitt's "Perfectly Good Guitar".

 

I couldn't agree more - it's a senseless waste to break a perfectly good guitar. I'd much rather see them give it to some kid who's just starting out or someone else who couldn't afford one instead.

 

 

[video=youtube;_diKw9F6t3U]

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I'll take a good player over tone any day. Why? Because a good player will shape his playing around the available tone to make it happen in the song. A mediocre player with a Dumble amp, a full rack of effects a a huge pedalboard is still a mediocre player. Good players have tone in their hands.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

It sounds like we're pretty much in agreement here that talent trumps production and a great song tops both.

 

But taking this in a slightly different direction...I think a great singer takes the pot, as it's been shown over and over again that a truly gifted vocalist/stylist (e.g., Sinatra, Billie Holiday, etc.) can take a weak song and turn it into something extraordinary.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It sounds like we're pretty much in agreement here that talent trumps production and a great song tops both.

 

But taking this in a slightly different direction...I think a great singer takes the pot, as it's been shown over and over again that a truly gifted vocalist/stylist (e.g., Sinatra, Billie Holiday, etc.) can take a weak song and turn it into something extraordinary.

 

 

The singer is usually the main focus for the average listener, and out of all the people in a typical band, they're the one who can most easily convey thoughts and emotions. That's what people tend to pay the most attention to, not the sound of the drummer's hi hats. Heck, the average listener doesn't even care what kind of delay pedal or overdrive the guitarist used... :eek2:;)

 

As the old saying goes, no one ever hums the console. That's right, even the mixing board you used, or the type of summing, doesn't matter to most people. The song, and the way it's delivered matter to most listeners way more than the actual sound of the recording typically does.

 

That doesn't mean I still don't want an API board... :lol:

 

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share




×
×
  • Create New...