Jump to content

whats a good way to dry a wet guitar?


Still.ill
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Members

What kinda "wet" we talkin' about? Rain water, drinking water, wine, beer, did somone pee in it? What?

 

I suppose a hand-held hair dryer would work......in time.

 

Seriously..I don't know, but I've heard sprinkle talcum powder in the sound hole, swirl it around, then wait for the powder to absorb the moisture. It can then be sucked out with a vacuum cleaner hose.

 

I've never had to do this, so I don't know if this works or not. It sure sounds like a better idea than pouring Sakrete into it!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

What kinda "wet" we talkin' about? Rain water, drinking water, wine, beer, did somone pee in it? What?


I suppose a hand-held hair dryer would work......in time.


Seriously..I don't know, but I've heard sprinkle talcum powder in the sound hole, swirl it around, then wait for the powder to absorb the moisture. It can then be sucked out with a vacuum cleaner hose.


I've never had to do this, so I don't know if this works or not. It sure sounds like a better idea than pouring Sakrete into it!

 

wet as in it was sitting outside in a room outside of a case for a day in NYC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Man, I don't know. I don't even know if you should relax the strings or leave the guitar tuned up.

 

Hopefully a luthier will chime in here real soon. Hang in there......helps on the way.......I hope.

 

Do you own a dehumidifier? If you do, try to get the guitar into a closet with the dehumidifier running in there with it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

What I'm having trouble understanding is how it sat outside, all day long, in NYC, without being stolen!

 

And don't say I'm "wrong and a liar"......I've been to New York....a few times!!

 

I saw a car broken down on the Queensborough Blvd. and later that day the whole damned car had been totally dismantled and taken away in pieces!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

wet as in it was sitting outside in a room outside of a case for a day in NYC

 

I'm not sure I'm understanding your description of the location of the guitar, and it sounds like other folks are a bit befuddled as well.

 

It sounds like your guitar was sitting out in the open (i.e. not in a case) in a room on the inside of your house . . . is that right?

 

If that's the case, then I don't think you have anything to worry about. Even if it's been very humid in NYC, the fact that your guitar was indoors means something. If you ran a dehumidifier for a day to take some of the moisture out of the air, your guitar would dry out in no time.

 

Even if your guitar got stuck out in the rain, I'll stand by the dehumidifier. If you set one up near your guitar, it'll suck the humidity out of the air, which will in turn suck the water out of the guitar. It'll take a couple of days, probably, but it'll get your git dried out eventually.

 

Oh yeah . . . and a word of advice for next time:

 

Try not to get your guitar wet :cop:.

 

:facepalm:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

FIXED

wet as in it was sitting
un-cased
for a day in NYC

 

Unless humidity was well above normal or it was submerged in water I'd tend not to worry. The guitar will soon acclimate back to within it's normal range once returned home. If it was home already, I'd quit worrying and get on with playing.

 

Drying out is best taken slowly and done over a period of time. If it was soaked, I'd mop up surplus water and allow the instrument to dry out slowly and naturally at moderate temperatures. It's not an end of the world situation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Nix the hair dryer. Much damage could ensue from over drying, uneven dryng. As Gary say's drying should be a gradual process.

If I'm getting this right, you left your guitar outside the case, inside the house, in high natural humidity situation. If that's the case, I'd say do absolutely nothing. Keep an eye on th RH in the future to avoid extremes, but it will shed the extra moisture pretty quick without taking extreme measures.

And seriously, the hair dryer is a very bad idea. So's the talcum powder.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

FIXED



Unless humidity was well above normal or it was submerged in water I'd tend not to worry. The guitar will soon acclimate back to within it's normal range once returned home. If it was home already, I'd quit worrying and get on with playing.


Drying out is best taken slowly and done over a period of time. If it was soaked, I'd mop up surplus water and allow the instrument to dry out slowly and naturally at moderate temperatures. It's not an end of the world situation.

 

Righty-O :thu:

 

I wouldn't get in a panic about it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Righty-O
:thu:

I wouldn't get in a panic about it.

 

What these guys said. It's best to mop up the excess, then let it dry slowly in a room with good air circulation and moderate temperatures. Make sure the air doesn't blow directly on the git.

 

Way back in the day, I once dropped a git in a lake from a boat and it took us a while to retrieve it. It survived that party and so did I. :facepalm:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Righty-O
:thu:

I wouldn't get in a panic about it.

 

Don't listen to this man! He actually makes guitars that have no bridge pins! And sells them for more money at that! As far as drying your guitar, the best way is on the embers of an old campfire. It will dry it out quickly and spontaneously, leaving no trace of the previous moisture.

 

BigAl :eek:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Wouldn't chemicals and/or potential variances in the pH of rainwater have a detrimental effect on the guitar?

 

Since the guitar wasn't actually sitting out in the rain---at least, I don't think it was---the pH of rainwater and any chemical impurities in the precipitation wouldn't have an effect on the guitar at all. It sounds like the OP left his guitar un-cased inside his house for a day and it was a little humid. No rain, no pH, no chemicals, no worries :cool:.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Actually, the amount of moisture you guitar absorbs is the inverse of the coefficient of the replenishment cycle of the droplets it is exposed to. If you take the square of the hypotenuse of that measurement and multiply by Pi you should come up with an answer of about 1. If the result is greater than 1 then you need to keep in a airtight chamber for precisely 17 1/2 minutes with a fan doing 1700 rpm's blowing air on it. This will sufficiently evacuate said humidifaction from the wood. If the answer was less than 1, you need to wipe the interior of the guitar with a semi saturated 50% polyester and 50% cotton cloth with microfibres. This should neutralize any detrimental conjunctivitis in the mating areas of the flora.

 

BigAl :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
Actually, the amount of moisture you guitar absorbs is the inverse of the coefficient of the replenishment cycle of the droplets it is exposed to. If you take the square of the hypotenuse of that measurement and multiply by Pi you should come up with an answer of about 1. If the result is greater than 1 then you need to keep in a airtight chamber for precisely 17 1/2 minutes with a fan doing 1700 rpm's blowing air on it. This will sufficiently evacuate said humidifaction from the wood. If the answer was less than 1, you need to wipe the interior of the guitar with a semi saturated 50% polyester and 50% cotton cloth with microfibres. This should neutralize any detrimental conjunctivitis in the mating areas of the flora.


BigAl
:)

Spoken like a true smartass:thu:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

It's not like you dropped it in a lake or left it sitting in the rain. I've lived in the southeast my whole life; that's humidity.

 

If it really is wet (which it seems like it's not) stuff it full of crumpled up newspaper and let the newspaper absorb the moisture. Change the paper if it gets damp.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...