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jackcheez

Got a new amp, itching to gig :mad: !!!

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Posted (edited)

Orange AD200 mk3 with a 2x12 from 440 Live. Sounds great at home, very organic. Need to gig before final judgment is passed. It’s a fairly compact rig for a small stage. I’ve used the cab before with a GK 800RB and it sounded great. I’m going for maximum big thump/small size ratio here. 
 

CED7192A-81C7-4B09-A09A-8F74CA4E7435.jpeg

Edited by jackcheez
Reload pic

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looks good :thu:

do you get enough 'thump' from the 2x12 rather than a 15?

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6 minutes ago, daddymack said:

looks good :thu:

do you get enough 'thump' from the 2x12 rather than a 15?

Didn't they tell you? Size doesn't matter.

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1 hour ago, daddymack said:

looks good :thu:

do you get enough 'thump' from the 2x12 rather than a 15?

Yes. A good 2x12 can do amazing stuffs. 

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3 hours ago, jackcheez said:

Orange AD200 mk3 with a 2x12 from 440 Live. Sounds great at home, very organic. Need to gig before final judgment is passed. It’s a fairly compact rig for a small stage. I’ve used the cab before with a GK 800RB and it sounded great. I’m going for maximum big thump/small size ratio here. 
 

358E87E8-5C1F-4AD6-B1D4-D0BA4FCCDFBA.thumb.jpeg.a0d273a746a810a9594306740268c95d.jpeg

I had to look it up, since you pic was dead.

 

Looks like a nice tube bass amp.

58 manageable pounds.

I'm a guitar player, but I have a couple of bass amps.

 

One is a early made in the UK  Ashdown abm 500 combo. Funny I was gonna get the 2x10 model and said how much more can the 4x10 model weigh.:facepalm:

Well the amp weighs 110 lbs. So it sits in my cellar. 

The other bass amp I own  is a SWR California Blonde..

 

Looks like an amp that waiting to see some stage time.

Nothing is happen here, and most concerts and club show will have to wait.

Not the most exciting summer for sure.

 

 

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9 hours ago, Mikeo said:

I had to look it up, since you pic was dead.

 

Looks like a nice tube bass amp.

58 manageable pounds.

I'm a guitar player, but I have a couple of bass amps.

 

One is a early made in the UK  Ashdown abm 500 combo. Funny I was gonna get the 2x10 model and said how much more can the 4x10 model weigh.:facepalm:

Well the amp weighs 110 lbs. So it sits in my cellar. 

The other bass amp I own  is a SWR California Blonde..

 

Looks like an amp that waiting to see some stage time.

Nothing is happen here, and most concerts and club show will have to wait.

Not the most exciting summer for sure.

 

 

I reloaded the pic. Don’t know what’s going on there. 
 

Isn’t the California Blonde an acoustic guitar amp ?

 

...and yes. Worst. Summer. Ever. The wife and I have celebrated two birthdays and a ten year anniversary by getting takeout. Then again, if that’s our biggest problem we are thankful. 
 

Cheers, Mikeo ! 

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19 minutes ago, jackcheez said:

I reloaded the pic. Don’t know what’s going on there. 
 

Isn’t the California Blonde an acoustic guitar amp ?

 

...and yes. Worst. Summer. Ever. The wife and I have celebrated two birthdays and a ten year anniversary by getting takeout. Then again, if that’s our biggest problem we are thankful. 
 

Cheers, Mikeo ! 

Well the California Blonde was originally designed as a double bass amp. However if you plug an acoustic guitar amp it to it also sound amazing. Many folks like Steve Earle used them for acoustic guitars. I used mine for my acoustic guitar sound. It's not what I would call a light amp. After the Fishman Loud Boxes amps came out, I bought a Fishman Loud Box Performer and used that. It's about 20 lbs lighter.  Mine is the older Loud Box Performer in the black covering.

Like this.

Loudbox_Performer_front_an-9881652fa721d

 

 

They are also very good for amplifying a violin or mandolin.

I'm not sure what year about my newest mandolin, but I have 2. One is an old Flatiron A model built in Bozeman MT. The newest is a Gibson Gibson F5G, which is amazing. They are not cheap. I had issues with my first Gibson Mandolin. Chief Gibson Mandolin make David Harvey was going to build me a new one, but found something that was at the Gibson Showroom.

Believe me, I'm not the best mandolin player, and I'm probably not worthy of owning such a fine instrument

 

I have the cover for the SWR, but Fishman never made a cover for the Loud-boxes. You need to order one through Tuki.

I also have a few other acoustic amps too, including a Mini Charge. I was gonna do some street buskin with the thing, but times with the covid 19 kind of changed that for this year at least. Got a nice travel bag with that too.

 

I'm not exactly a bass player, but in 1983 I bought my First American P Bass. It was nice. I then bought a American Jazz and the the American Jazz Deluxe came. As a guitar player the Jazz Deluxe is amazing, with Active pups. You can get the sound of a Jazz or P bass and much more. I have what is called a see through ash blonde, and I have never seen another one.

I ended up selling the P bass, cause it just sat. I traded it out for a Martin 00016. I have no regrets on that.  I was gigging with a Martin 00016 with a cutaway and the Fishman blender system. This is still my bar brawler acoustic.

A buddy of my gave me a Kala acoustic bass for my 50th birthday. It's pretty cool, but doesn't have an active pick up in it like the new ones. That's fine, if I need more input, I have a few active direct box pre amps, including a LR Baggs Venue DI, which I bought for the mandolin and I have been using a  Fishman Spectra DI for well over 10 years.

 

The only really nice thing about this social distancing thing is, I'm putting in a lot of hometime practicing and learning new songs. Kind of perfecting a live show thing.

I retired last year. I was the last one to go. They tried to change the job, but it was a state job and I was in charge of all the physics equipment in a smaller educational lab. The PhD's really didn't know how to run anything. Seems like everything I did for the past 30 years. There was a lot at stake, including 65 weeks of sicktime on the books, 2 weeks personal time, and 6 weeks vacation. Walking one day and basically said FU. 

 

Around that time my wife and I got a 4 month old rescue puppy. He's coming along good now, but omg has he been far from the easiest guy to work with.  Spending time with him, walking him, catch and fetch time. There's been more than a few times I said let's return him.

I had a weird case of diverticulitis a month ago. I have never had that and it doesn't run in my family. I dropped all milk products, and eat all basic organics now. No refined sugars, or added salts. I'm feeling really awesome. My and the dog put in about 4 miles a day. I'd run, but the dog is still getting a bit wacky when  I do and tend to chase me and not follow.

 

Peace and good health to ya.

 

 

 

 

 

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23 hours ago, daddymack said:

which 'they'? :idk:

You know. Them.

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Congratulations. Happy New Amp Day. Here's hoping you'll get to gig with it one of these days. :thu:

On 7/16/2020 at 11:54 AM, daddymack said:

looks good :thu:

do you get enough 'thump' from the 2x12 rather than a 15?

Allowing 1" all around for the frame and surround, a pair of 12's has 18% more cone area than a single 15. I'd think that should translate into more "thump." Still, 12's are comparatively rare in bass cabs. Wonder why that is?

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'throw'...15s have more surface to go deep...it would also depend on the specs of the 12s...if they are built to the right specs, they can get pretty deep. I also like a good 4x10 bass cab for punch, not bottom...although, what a good 10 gives as bottom is typically not flabby or farty, whereas 12s can be.

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The diameter of the driver has somewhere between very little and nothing at all to do with how a bass cabinet sounds. There are several factors that do, but diameter isn't one of them. Some factors are indirectly related to diameter, such as total swept volume (Vd, the active area of the cone times the distance it travels, or throw). Larger drivers tend to have larger throws, simply because they're larger, but there are lots of 18" drivers with less throw than some 12"s. How you get the Vd isn't important, which is why Phil Jones cabinets sound good using 5" drivers.

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16 hours ago, daddymack said:

'throw'...15s have more surface to go deep...

"Throw" is determined by speaker design and surround, not diameter. Further, in my example, a single 15" would need to move 1.18" to move as much air as two 12"s moving 1" each.

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Science aside, different size speakers have different characteristics. I like 12s because they don’t favor any one characteristic over any other. Nor do they lack anything. They are organic sounding to me. These particular speakers are branded 440 Live, but they are made by Celestion. The cab is 4 ohms rated at 700 watts. 
 

I would like to try one of those Phil Jones cabinets. Maybe some day. 

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11 minutes ago, jackcheez said:

Science aside, different size speakers have different characteristics. I like 12s because they don’t favor any one characteristic over any other. Nor do they lack anything. They are organic sounding to me. These particular speakers are branded 440 Live, but they are made by Celestion. The cab is 4 ohms rated at 700 watts. 
 

I would like to try one of those Phil Jones cabinets. Maybe some day. 

ive heard you like 12’s...

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the danley sound labs dts20 has a single 12” and gets down to 16hz 500wtt@8 ohms...   3 please...

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Posted (edited)

It’s the green goddess !!! :love:
 

There’s nothing like a throbbing 12.  :thu:

Edited by jackcheez

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, jackcheez said:

It’s the green goddess !!! :love:
 

There’s nothing like a throbbing 12.  :thu:

hello sugar britches... i wanna set three of those danley 12’s under my aas... two front, one back facing...  under the riser...   pulsing, throbbing 12’s providing a 360 degree deep tissue massage for errywon!!!     talk about laying down a groove! 

Edited by Voltan

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On 7/19/2020 at 4:34 PM, jackcheez said:

Science aside, different size speakers have different characteristics. I like 12s because they don’t favor any one characteristic over any other. Nor do they lack anything. They are organic sounding to me. These particular speakers are branded 440 Live, but they are made by Celestion. The cab is 4 ohms rated at 700 watts. 
 

I would like to try one of those Phil Jones cabinets. Maybe some day. 

Well, that's the problem: you can't set the science aside. Different diameter drivers simply don't have inherently different characteristics. People used to say that fifteens were boomy and tens had a "tight" bass, but my 2x10" pushes boomy and my 1x15" much less so. When I switch out the driver, the 1x15" becomes even "tighter," with an extended high end. In short, the single biggest factor on a cabinet's sound is frequency response, and that is not dependent on driver diameter (see Phil Jones).

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17 hours ago, isaac42 said:

Well, that's the problem: you can't set the science aside. Different diameter drivers simply don't have inherently different characteristics. People used to say that fifteens were boomy and tens had a "tight" bass, but my 2x10" pushes boomy and my 1x15" much less so. When I switch out the driver, the 1x15" becomes even "tighter," with an extended high end. In short, the single biggest factor on a cabinet's sound is frequency response, and that is not dependent on driver diameter (see Phil Jones).

It’s not a problem. The cab sounds great.
 

Case closed. 

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Posted (edited)

yassssss....   all about teh freakwhensees...    

 

 

 

Edited by Voltan
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frequency, and self contained, portable operation...

Matterhorn[edit]

In March 2007, DSL produced the Matterhorn, a single subwoofer made from an intermodal shipping container. Danley designed the Matterhorn to meet a military specification, to produce a low frequency sound in the range of 15 to 20 Hz, to be measured at 94 decibels at a distance of 250 meters. To accomplish this, Danley arranged forty 15-inch MTX subwoofer drivers in a tapped horn configuration, each driver powered by its own 1,000 watt amplifier. A diesel generator was included inside the container for operation in the field.[22] The subwoofer has a flat frequency response from 15 to 80 Hz, and is down 3 dB at 12 Hz.[23][24] The Matterhorn has been called the World's Biggest Subwoofer.[25]

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16 hours ago, Voltan said:

frequency, and self contained, portable operation...

Matterhorn[edit]

In March 2007, DSL produced the Matterhorn, a single subwoofer made from an intermodal shipping container. Danley designed the Matterhorn to meet a military specification, to produce a low frequency sound in the range of 15 to 20 Hz, to be measured at 94 decibels at a distance of 250 meters. To accomplish this, Danley arranged forty 15-inch MTX subwoofer drivers in a tapped horn configuration, each driver powered by its own 1,000 watt amplifier. A diesel generator was included inside the container for operation in the field.[22] The subwoofer has a flat frequency response from 15 to 80 Hz, and is down 3 dB at 12 Hz.[23][24] The Matterhorn has been called the World's Biggest Subwoofer.[25]

A rig only Bootsy Collins could fully appreciate. 

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On 7/22/2020 at 5:03 PM, Voltan said:

frequency, and self contained, portable operation...

Matterhorn[edit]

In March 2007, DSL produced the Matterhorn, a single subwoofer made from an intermodal shipping container. Danley designed the Matterhorn to meet a military specification, to produce a low frequency sound in the range of 15 to 20 Hz, to be measured at 94 decibels at a distance of 250 meters. To accomplish this, Danley arranged forty 15-inch MTX subwoofer drivers in a tapped horn configuration, each driver powered by its own 1,000 watt amplifier. A diesel generator was included inside the container for operation in the field.[22] The subwoofer has a flat frequency response from 15 to 80 Hz, and is down 3 dB at 12 Hz.[23][24] The Matterhorn has been called the World's Biggest Subwoofer.[25]

Now we're talkin'!

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