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  • So what are you reading NOW?!?!

    I'm enjoying reknowned atheist writer San Harris' Waking Up - A Guide To Spirituality Without Religion. This subject appeals to me greatly. I've always been very interested in higher consciousness, insight, mindfulness etc... and I've always been an atheist. Since being a little prepubescent Catholic school boy, this guy right here has rejected religious dogma of all varieties. Much to the chagrin of my dear departed, devout Catholic mother. Love you Mom! Miss you!

    Sam Harris explores the lack of contradiction in the idea of spirituality with no religion. Gosh bless Sam Harris!'''

    How about you? Whatcha reading?
    __________
    Ain't no sacrilege to call Elvis king
    Dad is great and all but he never could sing -
    Jesus

  • #2
    Im reading this thread!
    Seriously, I am reading a book about my Native American ancestors (My Paternal Grandmother was Cherokee).
    D
    Keeping the Harmony at Harmony Central

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    • #3
      The Bible
      smoke - new album
      the mirror - album
      storm - album
      the asylum - forum

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      • #4
        The Autobiography of Mark Twain
        http://thebasement.createaforum.com/

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        • #5
          Henderson The Rain King by Saul Bellow. wow, wow, and wow some more.

          Collected Poems of W. B. Yeats - no matter how many times I dip into Yeats, I find new amazing things.

          The Sea by John Banville - a very intense main character - as is Henderson in the Bellow novel. Another Irish word master...what do they do over there to produce all these incredible writers?

          I'm going to take another stab at Ulysses (Joyce not Homer) next - more Irish! Maybe this time I'll finish it.

          David Crosby's (heavily assisted) autobiography Long Time Gone. Pretty durn good for a rock star bio. Another intense main character! Dylan called Crosby an "obstreperous companion" in Chronicles. Now I see why.

          nat whilk ii

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          • #6
            "The Prize" by Daniel Yergin. It's for a class but it's pretty interesting. Basically it's the history of the oil industry.
            ____________________________
            Powered by squirrels.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by MarkydeSad View Post
              The Bible
              Me too.
              __________
              Ain't no sacrilege to call Elvis king
              Dad is great and all but he never could sing -
              Jesus

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              • #8
                I am still reading an Edward Abbey book called "Desert Solitaire" and about 3/4th through it, but have sort of stalled. Not sure why.

                And then I started reading "Sweetness: The Enigmatic Life of Walter Payton" by Jeff Pearlman, which I am also really enjoying.
                Ken Lee on 500px / Ken's Photo Store / Ken Lee Photography Facebook Website / Blueberry Buddha Studios / Ajanta Palace Houseboat - Kashmir / Hotel Green View - Kashmir / Eleven Shadows website / Ken Lee Photography Blog / Akai 12-track tape transfers / MY NEW ALBUM! The Mercury Seven

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                • nat whilk II
                  nat whilk II commented
                  Editing a comment
                  That Edward Abbey books sounds interesting, from what I see on Amazon.

                  Have you ever read "Goodbye to a River" by John Graves? You're not a Texan, so the local interest won't draw you, but it's a beautiful, profound book on Man In Nature from any point of view.

              • #9
                Practical Real Estate Law…. work related… its a college textbook that I`m voluntarily reading. What a concept, huh?

                The Future of the Mind… another voluntary read…. fascinating book actually.

                Cash: The Autobiography… night stand reading… good stuff. Cash has a nice rhythm to his writing and speaks to the reader as if it were just you and the man in black in a room just talking.



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                • #10
                  And what about books on CD. I turned my nose up for years. But... DRIVING IS A WASTE OF TIME!!! I highly recommend "The Great Courses". http://www.thegreatcourses.com/cours...s&pmt=e&ps=923

                  I finished a 10 CD course of How to Listen and Understand Great Music. Essentially a history of "serious music". From Gregorian chants and before to Philip Glass. Heavy, deep, and a hell of a lot of fun. This is an instructor and his class being taped. No production values save for direct music into the program thank god. It's first gen music on the program, no ambient classroom recording of that. But other than that, no production values. Just content. Serious content. Great stuff.

                  And currently I'm making my way through a course on The Art of War. It is not the text of a translation, but rather a teacher's take on the importance of it, how it can be misread, the core ideas within. I've tried to read the book a few times, a different translation each time and... I can't help wonder how studying the wind patterns of Northern China is going to bring me insight. But this course? The text is brought into its original context and reinterpreted for you and me. How we can use these time honored principles in our lives. Really cool. So... I study the Art of War on my way to and fro making a living.




                  __________
                  Ain't no sacrilege to call Elvis king
                  Dad is great and all but he never could sing -
                  Jesus

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Originally posted by Lee Knight View Post
                    And what about books on CD. I turned my nose up for years. But... DRIVING IS A WASTE OF TIME!!! I highly recommend "The Great Courses". http://www.thegreatcourses.com/cours...s&pmt=e&ps=923

                    I finished a 10 CD course of How to Listen and Understand Great Music. Essentially a history of "serious music". From Gregorian chants and before to Philip Glass. Heavy, deep, and a hell of a lot of fun. This is an instructor and his class being taped. No production values save for direct music into the program thank god. It's first gen music on the program, no ambient classroom recording of that. But other than that, no production values. Just content. Serious content. Great stuff.

                    And currently I'm making my way through a course on The Art of War. It is not the text of a translation, but rather a teacher's take on the importance of it, how it can be misread, the core ideas within. I've tried to read the book a few times, a different translation each time and... I can't help wonder how studying the wind patterns of Northern China is going to bring me insight. But this course? The text is brought into its original context and reinterpreted for you and me. How we can use these time honored principles in our lives. Really cool. So... I study the Art of War on my way to and fro making a living.



                    Lee,

                    Yes, absolutely. I love The Great Courses as well. I have quite a collection, including the course you mention. I find myself listening more and more to audio books as well. I spend a lot of time in the car commuting during the week, sometimes up to 5 hours a day so its a great way to spend all that time. Also, I enjoy listening to NPR but thats not a book either...

                    Last edited by Ernest Buckley; 11-10-2014, 09:31 PM.

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                    • #12
                      Currently am reading: The Thirty Years War: A Documentary History. I just finished a book on Thomas Becket.

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                      • #13
                        Originally posted by MarkydeSad View Post
                        The Bible
                        I don`t know if you were serious but I read it often and find it very inspiring. It may be outdated, archaic, and misunderstood in many places but I still find the stories very relevant and it does, at the end of the day, bring me some peace of mind and guidance for the present and future.

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                        • nat whilk II
                          nat whilk II commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Same here. However, I think it's essential to have some help in reading the Bible - historical, interpretative, theological help. Protestants did such a bang-up job of bringing the Bible to the masses that the masses got the idea that the Bible can be instantly understood read as ignorantly as possible, even taking the uninformed approach as the "spiritually pure" approach. " However, just me and the Bible" in reality translates typically into "just me listening to just me".

                      • #14
                        Gogol, Kafka and Poe. Three historic literary weirdos. Gogol was by far the best writer of the three. He was just plain nuts, that's all. He was also the weirdest of the three -- by far.
                        Last edited by Etienne Rambert; 11-11-2014, 09:29 AM.
                        He has escaped! Youtube , ​Murika , France

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                        • #15
                          I've been gorging on Sci-Fi from guttenberg.org, which publishes stuff that the copyright ran out on. I'm currently in the middle of the first issue of a sci-fi magazine that came out in the '30s.

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