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Dendy Jarrett

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About Dendy Jarrett

  • Rank
    Community Director
  • Birthday 12/16/1962

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  • Biography
    http://www.harmonycentral.com/meet-team-harmony-central--dendy-jarrett

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  • Location
    Nashville, Tennessee

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  • Interests
    Drumming and music, overlanding and outdoors

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  • Occupation
    Executive Director of Harmony Central

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  1. Whoa Calvin - You were correct. We had Births and Deaths heading switched. A complete oversight. Our apologies! We've corrected the article.ThanksDJ
  2. Join The Discussion Here:http://www.harmonycentral.com/forum/forum/Forums_General/acapella-50/31567913-play-no-evil-are-you-ready-for-music-censorship
  3. Good points jbreher - I had not seen either of those versions but they did show in a google search. I wasn't certain they were the same story line or plot, hence not mentioning them. But that ads more creed to the points I make! Thanks!
  4. Julieguitar - You could use a Y split cable to bring both your click and the house through to your ears. I'll have to test this out, but I believe you would then have control of how much drums are coming into your headphones or in ear monitors. As for the overhead mics being used for the snare and hi hat directly - I spoke with the designer of this system and it is optimized to use as presented with the two mics overhead. There is, however, nothing that would stand in the way of your using them as you suggest. The price is so low, you could actually buy two and come out way ahead!
  5. Jeffery - I honestly didn't read these comments by Carmine as negative. I think some of the challenge is that he was mounting this in a much smaller than the average bass drum (14"), so there was probably more than the average excess cordage. I'll also add, that rarely does something get added to my kit that I don't have to do some minor modifications to either the product or my kit since kit hardware and shell depth isn't standardized. The take away for me from the review is that there is a very easy and low-cost solution to mic isolation and mounting for your drums and that is a cool thing. I hear nothing but great feedback about you and your product. Peace! D
  6. But the time has come for me to do something about it… In the popular John Mayer song released in 2006, the lyrics in the chorus say this: It's hard to beat the system When we're standing at a distance So we keep waiting (waiting) Waiting on the world to change. I’ve been involved with Harmony Central since 2004. Our Mission Statement has always been to inspire people to Make Better Music, and we’ve been determined to stay true to that mission. There are times we may have fallen short, but after all, we are people. I write this not to grand stand, but I realize that many of you may have seen this in the press this past week and might wonder what it means for Harmony Central. I’ve accepted a new position with our parent company, Gibson. I believe that Harmony Central and our mission opened the door for the opportunity specifically because of our mission and how closely it ties in with the Gibson Foundation's new mission. Billboard Magazine - Jarrett Appointed Executive Director of the Gibson Foundation With Harmony Central, I’ve been able to provide words of encouragement, inspiration, and hope regarding music, teaching music, sharing music, and making better music. With this new appointment, I’ll be able to take that one step further by being able to give instruments while evangelizing all of the same great messages I’ve been able to tout while at Harmony Central. But what does all this mean for Harmony Central? Well, at least for now, I’m still here and hope to be here for a while longer. How can you help? Please go to www.gibsonfoundation.org and donate. 100% of your donation will go to help great partners whom we support…like Little Kids Rock, Notes For Notes, or Guitars for Vets (to name a few). The need is real, and the difference the gift of music makes has been proven over and over. So go be awesome and keep making better music – and if you feel compelled, help us help others to do the same. The time has come for me to do something about it…. -HC- Header Image courtesy Notes for Notes Jarrett Image courtesy Gibson _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  7. And what goes on there? NAMM (National Association of Music Merchants) is a not-for-profit association dedicated to promoting the joy of making music. It also provides support for the $17 billion global music products industry. There are two NAMM shows held in the United States every year: Winter NAMM in Anaheim and Summer NAMM in Nashville. In a nutshell, it’s where the musical instrument-related companies of the world gather to showcase their new wares to retailers, media, potential endorsers, and prospective investors. It’s also a place where you can see all sorts of performances and demos, from throughout-the-day demonstrations at various booths to one-off performances to epic concerts. For those who haven’t been to NAMM and wonder what it’s like, or for those who are going for the first time, here are some of my random thoughts and recollections. How to Get In The NAMM show is closed to the public (although Summer NAMM has had public days for the last few years), so if you don’t work in the industry, it can be tricky to get in. Sometimes music stores may offer passes to lucky customers or people call in favors. Basically, if you want to go to the NAMM Show, network, network, network! What to Do When You Get There Again, network, network, network! The NAMM show is where you’ll find upwards of 90,000 music industry pros, from retailers to teachers to gear designers to record company folk to media to artists. You never know who you’ll meet and what kinds of connections you can forge that can help you out professionally somewhere along the line. Once you’ve been to a few NAMM shows, it really takes on the vibe of returning to summer camp, seeing your buddies, catching up with everyone, and making new pals. Whether you’re there as media, an endorsed artist, an employee of a musical instrument company, or if you’ve been able to score yourself a pass, it’s a chance to meet other people in the field. So bring business cards! I think of it like this: when I was a teenager I was never cool because I was way too into music. But NAMM is now where I get to hang out with a whole bunch of other people who were equally uncool because they were equally into music. And it turns out there are a lot of us all concentrated in one area. A Learning Experience The NAMM show isn’t just about showcasing new gear on the show floor. There are also educational sessions, including Retail Boot Camp (one-day training for retailers, held the day before NAMM starts); NAMM U Breakfast Sessions, which involve discussions about the state of the musical instrument industry; the NAMM Idea Center, which features sessions all day; the H.O.T. (Hands-On Training) Zone dedicated to pro audio, entertainment technology, music business, recording, DJ, house of worship, stage and lighting industries, and more. I have a buddy who runs a music store and recording studio, and he’s found Retail Boot Camp and NAMM U Breakfast Sessions to be the absolute highlight of his NAMM experience. NAMM at Night At night there are all sorts of NAMM-related events. Many of them are invite-only (it helps to ask what’s on when you’re doing all that networking - “So hey, are you guys putting on any shows during NAMM?”). Some are open to the public and can be a great way of picking up on the NAMM vibe and the networking potential, even if you don’t have a pass. So, again—network, network, network! In the end, NAMM is like going to a musical instrument heaven. It can be loud, so I suggest good earplugs, but be prepared to enjoy yourself. Stay hydrated, be prepared to overpay for food and coffee, and - most of all - when you go—have fun! - HC - _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  8. …And it’s very much alive! Three years ago I wrote a Dear Musician called "Keep Music Alive." In it, I referenced that music did not die the day Buddy Holly’s plane crashed; rather, it stayed very much alive. I penned that article because in early 2016 we lost so many great musicians. The truth is, we continue to lose great musicians. I doubt many of you realized that this past June 25th was the 10-year anniversary of Michael Jackson’s death. I was certainly very surprised to be reminded that it had already been 10 years! Why? Because I’m still listening to his music to this day! To advance that sentiment, much of the music I grew up with is coming back into favor now because of remakes by more contemporary artists. Even as I type, Weezer’s remake of Toto’s “Africa” is getting air-play, as is Bad Wolves' remake of the Cranberries’ “Zombie.” Oh, yes, and there’s “Clearly” by Grace VanderWaal that was originally a Johnny Nash song. There’s even a television show called Songland that shows the process of song writing in a “competition” format whereby known artists will pick their next hits from competing contenders. It’s actually a pretty cool show. I noted in that original Keep Music Alive article that, when great musicians die or fade away, we're the ones who keep the music alive. Music becomes immortal through sharing—sharing the legacy, sharing the influence previous music has on current music, and sharing the joy of our favorite music with others. The tragedy of that plane crash in 1959, which caused the death of Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and J.P. Richardson, a.k.a. “the Big Bopper,” was incalculable. The singers of “Peggy Sue” and “Come On Let’s Go” and “Donna” and “La Bomba” were gone. At that time, it was believed that Rock and Roll would never be the same. Ironically, the only reason Buddy Holly chartered the plane was because his laundry was dirty and he wanted to get to the next venue early so he’d have some clean clothes. Little did he know…. Also ironic is that future country star Waylon Jennings was to have been on that flight, but he gave up his seat to “the Big Bopper” and was spared. Thirteen years after the crash, Don McLean wrote a song about the tragedy, “American Pie.” Next year will mark 50 years since the song was released, and it went to number 1 in 1972. At the time, he had no idea that this epic 8.5 minute-long song would speak to a nation about change both to music and the underlying tone of political change. He later stated: “It was an indescribable photograph of America that I tried to capture in words and music.” I still hold to my thoughts in my original article… In American Pie, McClean says: “I can’t remember if I cried When I read about his widowed bride But something touched me deep inside The day the music died” I agree that music can touch all of us deep inside, but I’ll hang on to McLean's image of a red, white, and blue thumbs up and continue to keep the music alive. Remember this—people are mortal, but music is immortal. -HC- _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  9. Dear Musician – Music Migration And we’re not going south… by Dendy Jarrett Back in early June, planning began to move Harmony Central to an all new platform. This was not a flippant decision. If you’ve been a member of our community, you know that out of the history of platform migrations, only one of them wasn’t a disaster. In my June 10th Dear Musician – Sometimes Change is Good!, I explain a lot of the reasons behind our upcoming changes. These changes are expected to take place between now and the end of August. We ask for your patience as we merge the platform and while we work tirelessly to have a minimal outage and still keep HC feeling like that old “hang” to which you are accustomed. It also seems fitting that we do this at this time of year. The birds will start migrating soon as they fly south for the fall and winter season. This time of year really brings music to the forefront of my mind because when I was a teen, music was so influential. This time of year marked the end of summer vacation and the return to marching band, school prep and a final nod to summer. It was music that kept me grounded during these times of change. To that point, it seems that we all (and especially musicians) go through seasons of music migration. Most musicians like a pretty wide variety of musical genre. If you are like me, you go through swings of music migration. You may be in a period of time when you are listening to a lot of 70s music, and then will find yourself in 80s mode. I even find in my music migration that I drift between music genres as well. I may be in an R&B mode for a while, and then go into a FM power rock mood…heck, even Jazz! As the days start to grow shorter and the birds start to migrate, please reflect on the power of music in your life. Pass it on to others. There is way too much negative in the world these days (it seems), and music can wash away the stain of a great deal of that disdain. And as we migrate Harmony Central, please allow us a little forgiveness, as our goal overall is to provide a better experience for you. –HC- _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  10. Dear Musician – Involuntary Musical Imagery “I can’t get that song out of my head!” by Dendy Jarrett It seems this happens to everyone from time to time...you know...when that song gets stuck in your head…sometimes for days at a time! You try to shake it by introducing a distraction to your routine, but it doesn’t seem to help most of the time. This can be especially frustrating if you are a musician—honestly, enough to drive you almost insane. There are terms for this phenomenon: brainworm, sticky music, stuck song syndrome, earworm, or the scientific term – Involuntary Musical Imagery (IMI). Believe it or not, this is a widely studied occurrence. There are true areas of science (mostly centered around music psychology) that focus on this. Biomusicology, cognitive musicology, cognitive neuroscience of music, evolutionary musicology and psychoacoustics are just a few of these. As much as this can drive the normal person (and especially a musician) crazy, there are people experiencing this who have real disorders like auditory arrhythmia, musical hallucinations, musician’s dystonia, and others. By and large, however, this is just one of those situations in which you may hear a catchy melody or lyric line and it crawls in your head and just likes to live there. It can even be so severe that you go to sleep hearing the song and then wake hoping it is gone; yet, there it plays again – over and over in your head. As for me, I try to turn it into a positive. I walk with the cadence of the song, or use it to pace a project, or I’ll pick up my instrument and start focusing on something else to take the tune away from the forefront of my mind. The good news is that, for many, it helps you ingrain a song in your head. If you are a musician and play regularly, this may be a good thing if you are adding a song to your repertoire. As fellow musicians, I’m certain you can relate. Take it as an opportunity to go make better music. We realize, however, that the insanity can be real. Involuntary Musical Imagery can leave you saying, “I can’t get that song out of my head!” -HC- _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
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