Jump to content

Dendy Jarrett

Administrators
  • Content Count

    3,422
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    3

Everything posted by Dendy Jarrett

  1. In the Sonny and Cher song, The Beat Goes On, the lyrics read: Charleston was once the rage History has turned the page The mini skirts, the current thing Teenybopper is our newborn king The beat goes on, the beat goes on Drums keep pounding a rhythm to the brain! Even though that song was originally released in 1967, the song points out that some things change, and what was once in favor is no longer in favor. Harmony Central is now on its 5th platform (Vb3/4, Jive, Lithium, VB5, and now Invision). We gave you the scoop in the last newsletter about why we made the change, and here we are on the other side. Website platform changes are always scary and represent a lot of work. There’s data conversion, remapping, redesigning the user experience and navigation, and using the information regarding how people currently use the site. This helps us dictate how the new site responds while keeping up with website experience best practices. When we flipped the switch, we carried over hundreds of thousands of images and tens of millions of formatted articles, reviews, and forum posts. We loaded the first year’s worth of data into cache for quick loads. This let the course of the week slowly index and load everything from the last 20 years. While everyone has preferences and opinions, we were extremely happy to hear from hundreds of users about how much they prefer the new site (even if some took a day or two to get comfortable with all the new tools). Nothing is perfect, but this launch felt as close to perfect as possible, and we thank you, the community, for sticking with us, providing feedback when the lights came back on, and helping us make the final “live” tweaks to accommodate the forum experience you all deserve and expect. What’s new or different? We tried to keep things as similar as we could for your familiarity without carrying over the bad parts of the previous transition. From the technical side, we’ve cut our page load time by 60% and improved the average forum user’s session, including posting and image uploading, by a reduction of 30 seconds of total visit load time. From a functional side, we’ve reintroduced native multi-quote, follow/hide, post reactions, and notifications to the forums. Search is still indexing (yeah, we have a LOT of data!), and our new SPAM filters are making it easier for real people to sign up, while deterring more spam bots. Although we followed best practices for website design and themes for 2019, we had feedback from some users that they’d like a darker theme. While we aren’t considering a “dark” mode at this point, we did drop in a theme with a slightly darker background to text fields, like posts or articles. You can select that theme at the bottom of any page (it’s called “Harmony Central Alternate). Our articles, reviews, and news sections have been updated to reveal more content up front. We’re currently touching up those that are more than a few years old to present as well as our newest pieces. Our website has changed, but our mission hasn’t. We will always be the place you can learn about and discuss music gear, technique, and life in general. If there is one reason Harmony Central continues to be one of the most prominent musician communities for more than twenty years, it is because of you, the community. That lyrical content of The Beat Goes On has stood the test of time and some things must change, but for us, … the beat goes on. -HC- Thank you. Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion and music industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  2. Join The Discussion Here:http://www.harmonycentral.com/forum/forum/Forums_General/acapella-50/31567913-play-no-evil-are-you-ready-for-music-censorship
  3. Whoa Calvin - You were correct. We had Births and Deaths heading switched. A complete oversight. Our apologies! We've corrected the article.ThanksDJ
  4. Good points jbreher - I had not seen either of those versions but they did show in a google search. I wasn't certain they were the same story line or plot, hence not mentioning them. But that adds more creed to the points I make! Thanks!
  5. Julieguitar - You could use a Y split cable to bring both your click and the house through to your ears. I'll have to test this out, but I believe you would then have control of how much drums are coming into your headphones or in ear monitors. As for the overhead mics being used for the snare and hi hat directly - I spoke with the designer of this system and it is optimized to use as presented with the two mics overhead. There is, however, nothing that would stand in the way of your using them as you suggest. The price is so low, you could actually buy two and come out way ahead!
  6. Jeffery - I honestly didn't read these comments by Carmine as negative. I think some of the challenge is that he was mounting this in a much smaller than the average bass drum (14"), so there was probably more than the average excess cordage. I'll also add, that rarely does something get added to my kit that I don't have to do some minor modifications to either the product or my kit since kit hardware and shell depth isn't standardized. The take away for me from the review is that there is a very easy and low-cost solution to mic isolation and mounting for your drums and that is a cool thing. I hear nothing but great feedback about you and your product. Peace! D
  7. In the popular John Mayer song released in 2006, the lyrics in the chorus say this: It's hard to beat the system When we're standing at a distance So we keep waiting (waiting) Waiting on the world to change. I’ve been involved with Harmony Central since 2004. Our Mission Statement has always been to inspire people to Make Better Music, and we’ve been determined to stay true to that mission. There are times we may have fallen short, but after all, we are people. I write this not to grand stand, but I realize that many of you may have seen this in the press this past week and might wonder what it means for Harmony Central. I’ve accepted a new position with our parent company, Gibson. I believe that Harmony Central and our mission opened the door for the opportunity specifically because of our mission and how closely it ties in with the Gibson Foundation's new mission. Billboard Magazine - Jarrett Appointed Executive Director of the Gibson Foundation With Harmony Central, I’ve been able to provide words of encouragement, inspiration, and hope regarding music, teaching music, sharing music, and making better music. With this new appointment, I’ll be able to take that one step further by being able to give instruments while evangelizing all of the same great messages I’ve been able to tout while at Harmony Central. But what does all this mean for Harmony Central? Well, at least for now, I’m still here and hope to be here for a while longer. How can you help? Please go to www.gibsonfoundation.org and donate. 100% of your donation will go to help great partners whom we support…like Little Kids Rock, Notes For Notes, or Guitars for Vets (to name a few). The need is real, and the difference the gift of music makes has been proven over and over. So go be awesome and keep making better music – and if you feel compelled, help us help others to do the same. The time has come for me to do something about it…. -HC- Header Image courtesy Notes for Notes Jarrett Image courtesy Gibson _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  8. NAMM (National Association of Music Merchants) is a not-for-profit association dedicated to promoting the joy of making music. It also provides support for the $17 billion global music products industry. There are two NAMM shows held in the United States every year: Winter NAMM in Anaheim and Summer NAMM in Nashville. In a nutshell, it’s where the musical instrument-related companies of the world gather to showcase their new wares to retailers, media, potential endorsers, and prospective investors. It’s also a place where you can see all sorts of performances and demos, from throughout-the-day demonstrations at various booths to one-off performances to epic concerts. For those who haven’t been to NAMM and wonder what it’s like, or for those who are going for the first time, here are some of my random thoughts and recollections. How to Get In The NAMM show is closed to the public (although Summer NAMM has had public days for the last few years), so if you don’t work in the industry, it can be tricky to get in. Sometimes music stores may offer passes to lucky customers or people call in favors. Basically, if you want to go to the NAMM Show, network, network, network! What to Do When You Get There Again, network, network, network! The NAMM show is where you’ll find upwards of 90,000 music industry pros, from retailers to teachers to gear designers to record company folk to media to artists. You never know who you’ll meet and what kinds of connections you can forge that can help you out professionally somewhere along the line. Once you’ve been to a few NAMM shows, it really takes on the vibe of returning to summer camp, seeing your buddies, catching up with everyone, and making new pals. Whether you’re there as media, an endorsed artist, an employee of a musical instrument company, or if you’ve been able to score yourself a pass, it’s a chance to meet other people in the field. So bring business cards! I think of it like this: when I was a teenager I was never cool because I was way too into music. But NAMM is now where I get to hang out with a whole bunch of other people who were equally uncool because they were equally into music. And it turns out there are a lot of us all concentrated in one area. A Learning Experience The NAMM show isn’t just about showcasing new gear on the show floor. There are also educational sessions, including Retail Boot Camp (one-day training for retailers, held the day before NAMM starts); NAMM U Breakfast Sessions, which involve discussions about the state of the musical instrument industry; the NAMM Idea Center, which features sessions all day; the H.O.T. (Hands-On Training) Zone dedicated to pro audio, entertainment technology, music business, recording, DJ, house of worship, stage and lighting industries, and more. I have a buddy who runs a music store and recording studio, and he’s found Retail Boot Camp and NAMM U Breakfast Sessions to be the absolute highlight of his NAMM experience. NAMM at Night At night there are all sorts of NAMM-related events. Many of them are invite-only (it helps to ask what’s on when you’re doing all that networking - “So hey, are you guys putting on any shows during NAMM?”). Some are open to the public and can be a great way of picking up on the NAMM vibe and the networking potential, even if you don’t have a pass. So, again—network, network, network! In the end, NAMM is like going to a musical instrument heaven. It can be loud, so I suggest good earplugs, but be prepared to enjoy yourself. Stay hydrated, be prepared to overpay for food and coffee, and - most of all - when you go—have fun! - HC - _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  9. Three years ago I wrote a Dear Musician called "Keep Music Alive." In it, I referenced that music did not die the day Buddy Holly’s plane crashed; rather, it stayed very much alive. I penned that article because in early 2016 we lost so many great musicians. The truth is, we continue to lose great musicians. I doubt many of you realized that this past June 25th was the 10-year anniversary of Michael Jackson’s death. I was certainly very surprised to be reminded that it had already been 10 years! Why? Because I’m still listening to his music to this day! To advance that sentiment, much of the music I grew up with is coming back into favor now because of remakes by more contemporary artists. Even as I type, Weezer’s remake of Toto’s “Africa” is getting air-play, as is Bad Wolves' remake of the Cranberries’ “Zombie.” Oh, yes, and there’s “Clearly” by Grace VanderWaal that was originally a Johnny Nash song. There’s even a television show called Songland that shows the process of song writing in a “competition” format whereby known artists will pick their next hits from competing contenders. It’s actually a pretty cool show. I noted in that original Keep Music Alive article that, when great musicians die or fade away, we're the ones who keep the music alive. Music becomes immortal through sharing—sharing the legacy, sharing the influence previous music has on current music, and sharing the joy of our favorite music with others. The tragedy of that plane crash in 1959, which caused the death of Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and J.P. Richardson, a.k.a. “the Big Bopper,” was incalculable. The singers of “Peggy Sue” and “Come On Let’s Go” and “Donna” and “La Bomba” were gone. At that time, it was believed that Rock and Roll would never be the same. Ironically, the only reason Buddy Holly chartered the plane was because his laundry was dirty and he wanted to get to the next venue early so he’d have some clean clothes. Little did he know…. Also ironic is that future country star Waylon Jennings was to have been on that flight, but he gave up his seat to “the Big Bopper” and was spared. Thirteen years after the crash, Don McLean wrote a song about the tragedy, “American Pie.” Next year will mark 50 years since the song was released, and it went to number 1 in 1972. At the time, he had no idea that this epic 8.5 minute-long song would speak to a nation about change both to music and the underlying tone of political change. He later stated: “It was an indescribable photograph of America that I tried to capture in words and music.” I still hold to my thoughts in my original article… In American Pie, McClean says: “I can’t remember if I cried When I read about his widowed bride But something touched me deep inside The day the music died” I agree that music can touch all of us deep inside, but I’ll hang on to McLean's image of a red, white, and blue thumbs up and continue to keep the music alive. Remember this—people are mortal, but music is immortal. -HC- _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  10. Back in early June, planning began to move Harmony Central to an all new platform. This was not a flippant decision. If you’ve been a member of our community, you know that out of the history of platform migrations, only one of them wasn’t a disaster. In my June 10th Dear Musician – Sometimes Change is Good!, I explain a lot of the reasons behind our upcoming changes. These changes are expected to take place between now and the end of August. We ask for your patience as we merge the platform and while we work tirelessly to have a minimal outage and still keep HC feeling like that old “hang” to which you are accustomed. It also seems fitting that we do this at this time of year. The birds will start migrating soon as they fly south for the fall and winter season. This time of year really brings music to the forefront of my mind because when I was a teen, music was so influential. This time of year marked the end of summer vacation and the return to marching band, school prep and a final nod to summer. It was music that kept me grounded during these times of change. To that point, it seems that we all (and especially musicians) go through seasons of music migration. Most musicians like a pretty wide variety of musical genre. If you are like me, you go through swings of music migration. You may be in a period of time when you are listening to a lot of 70s music, and then will find yourself in 80s mode. I even find in my music migration that I drift between music genres as well. I may be in an R&B mode for a while, and then go into a FM power rock mood…heck, even Jazz! As the days start to grow shorter and the birds start to migrate, please reflect on the power of music in your life. Pass it on to others. There is way too much negative in the world these days (it seems), and music can wash away the stain of a great deal of that disdain. And as we migrate Harmony Central, please allow us a little forgiveness, as our goal overall is to provide a better experience for you. –HC- _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  11. It seems this happens to everyone from time to time...you know...when that song gets stuck in your head…sometimes for days at a time! You try to shake it by introducing a distraction to your routine, but it doesn’t seem to help most of the time. This can be especially frustrating if you are a musician—honestly, enough to drive you almost insane. There are terms for this phenomenon: brainworm, sticky music, stuck song syndrome, earworm, or the scientific term – Involuntary Musical Imagery (IMI). Believe it or not, this is a widely studied occurrence. There are true areas of science (mostly centered around music psychology) that focus on this. Biomusicology, cognitive musicology, cognitive neuroscience of music, evolutionary musicology and psychoacoustics are just a few of these. As much as this can drive the normal person (and especially a musician) crazy, there are people experiencing this who have real disorders like auditory arrhythmia, musical hallucinations, musician’s dystonia, and others. By and large, however, this is just one of those situations in which you may hear a catchy melody or lyric line and it crawls in your head and just likes to live there. It can even be so severe that you go to sleep hearing the song and then wake hoping it is gone; yet, there it plays again – over and over in your head. As for me, I try to turn it into a positive. I walk with the cadence of the song, or use it to pace a project, or I’ll pick up my instrument and start focusing on something else to take the tune away from the forefront of my mind. The good news is that, for many, it helps you ingrain a song in your head. If you are a musician and play regularly, this may be a good thing if you are adding a song to your repertoire. As fellow musicians, I’m certain you can relate. Take it as an opportunity to go make better music. We realize, however, that the insanity can be real. Involuntary Musical Imagery can leave you saying, “I can’t get that song out of my head!” -HC- _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  12. Change can strike fear in the hearts of even the strongest of us. Remember when your favorite band broke up or your favorite radio station went off the air? Remember when that favorite keyboard stopped working and parts were no longer available? How about when your DAW was no longer supported and everything you had created up until that time was completely built on the now-defunct platform? It’s pretty scary stuff to some people. I’ve often viewed musical endeavors I’ve participated in as “living” entities. When the time came for the “season” to be over, I viewed some of those experiences like a death in the family. I would realize and be saddened that the music and experiences we created together would no longer exist except in lasting memories. Each of these musical experiences, left a lasting impression, some that I draw from to this day! Each had its own dynamics of band members, personality types, musical style, and magic. And some of it wasn’t always easy. An oak tree is mighty and strong when mature because it is one of the scrawniest when it is a sapling. Everything nature can throw at it abuses it. The net result, however, is a tree that has built muscle that allows it to stand strong in the end. Making music can result in this same type of life experience. Every experience stacks upon the last, and soon “you” are a result of the combination of everything you’ve gained from the collective experiences. Harmony Central’s been this way. We started in 1995 from humble beginnings but realized quickly that musicians like community. We like a place to “hang” together. We like being on “the bus” together or hanging in the “green room.” Through different ownership, Harmony Central experienced changes. Some good—some, well…not so much! If you’ve been here, you know what I’m talking about! We are changing once again. In the coming weeks, Harmony Central will once again undergo a transformation. Now, we’re working hard not to “move your cheese,” but everything can’t stay the same. Our custom code has become slow and clunky as browsers update and internet/wireless signals increase speeds. The net result is that Harmony Central has become a place where the user experience (UX) has become less than tolerable. So...we’re moving to a new platform! The good news: in the past these decisions were corporately driven. This time, team HC is being allowed to navigate the move. We are working tirelessly so when we emerge on the new platform, the experience is fast, friendly, and as flawless as we can make it. We ask for your patience. We ask for your feedback when the switch is thrown. We ask that you don’t panic if you have to transpose from E to E-flat! In the end, our goal remains to inspire you to make better music. We just want a better place for you to hang between sets! Cha, cha changes! -HC- _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  13. It’s Memorial Day, and you’re probably on a long weekend vacation or preparing for an afternoon barbecue. It could be a good time as well to take stock of your music gear and determine what you’ve used and/or haven’t used in a while. Much in the way downsizing in general has gained favor, downsizing your music gear might be a charitable way to free up some space, provide a nice tax write-off (check with your accountant), and give the gift of music. If you haven’t used a piece of music gear in over a year, chances are you may not ever use it again. If you’re like me, sometimes I hang onto music gear for sentimental reasons or “because I may need that sometime.” However, if you haven’t used it in a year or more, it may serve your local school or another music-centric charitable organization and provide a young person the inspiration to make music. There are some great organizations like Little Kids Rock, Notes for Notes, or the Mr. Holland’s Opus Foundation, all of whom endeavor to provide children in underserved areas with the ability to make music. Many of these children live in a vast delta between the haves and the have-nots. These organizations help fill that gap and provide tremendous programs to engage kids in learning instruments, making music and creating music through technology. You may find that some piece of gear has served its purpose with you but may be just the missing piece your school or one of these organizations needs. If you’re like me, years of collecting gear has created a lot of dormant gear. So I’m taking stock and assessing what I can live without (and still fulfill my music needs), and I’ll be gifting some gear to great causes. I’m not suggesting you part with that '59 Les Paul, but if you have some still useful gear, set it free to make music again. Consider downsizing while giving the gift of making better music! -HC- _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  14. by Dendy Jarrett If you haven’t experienced it yourself, you certainly know people who have. If you have experienced it, you know it! Music causes your skin to tingle, and during a particularly harmonic hit or climax in the music, it happens – Frisson! Frisson (n. – a French term) is a sudden strong feeling of excitement or fear; a thrill. That “skin tingle” leads to the formation of something we call chill or goose bumps. And not everyone has this experience. Turns out that studies show that you have to be “open to the experience.” Interestingly, the openness to experience the emotions that music evokes can range from every gamut of music genres. Participants in studies performed at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro measured skin responses, no matter if they were listening to classical or contemporary music. In a previous Dear Musician we explored What’s the Meaning of Music? In that article we slanted the emotional feelings of music toward the lyrical message. The Frisson Experience tends to result from a combination, however, of the entire make-up of the song—from lyric to chord progression to dynamics. The thing that is important to note about the Frisson Experience is that it means “aesthetic chills” – and is similar to the same feelings that can make the hair on the back of your neck stand up when you are confronted with a frightening experience. Some even refer to the Frisson Experience as having a “skin orgasm.” But the one thing that I think is missing about this phenomenon is the notion that it must be spontaneous. The only thing that may tip you off that it’s coming is that a particular passage of a song is building to what is certainly an impending musical climax. I’ve experienced Music’s Frisson Experience first hand. I know other musicians who have, as well. None of us really thought much about the scientific reasons behind why we experienced it. We just thought we were getting off on the music. Truth is, however, if you are a musician and are immersed in music on an intellectual level, you may be far more likely to experience this sensation. You likely experience music on a deeper level than just the aural experience. The research that has been done does show that The Frisson Experience may set you apart as a human being…and a musician! So keep making better music. -HC- _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  15. "Crap Song" is a strong statement. I agree that there may have been some opportunity to insert some more meaningful lyrics, but hey, some of the biggest hits ever had goofy choices of lyrics. I actually like the song (melodically speaking), and I do think the message in it is good. But hey, I prefer the old Streisand version of the movie myself, so what do I know. D
  16. When I was growing up, we were always discouraged from playing in the streets. But sometimes playing music in the streets can net a huge reward. In Ireland, making music in the streets is known as busking, and in Dublin, Ireland, playing on Grafton Street on any given day you’ll find myriad performers. One of the singers who’s developed her own YouTube channel showcasing her street performances is Allie Sherlock. Someone recommended I give her a listen, and I was instantly drawn in. Her voice is hauntingly mesmerizing. Her notes roll off in a signature way that sets her voice apart from so many others who perform covers on the street. She also is adept at crafting her own take on songs so that they work well with her vocal style. Allie’s voice is distinct, but that isn’t the only “wow” factor she has going for her. The fact that she was 12 at the time of her discovery is what is really impressive. It seems that I wasn’t the only person taken with Allie’s performances. Ellen DeGeneres found her on YouTube, as well, and invited her to be on her show. Her YouTube channel quickly passed the one million-subscriber mark, and this all led to her signing a five-year record deal with Ryan Tedder (One Republic). Now, at 13 years of age, she's on her way. I encourage you to check her out, as I believe you’ll enjoy her whiskey-alto voice. The point of my story is that you simply never know—you may be playing in the streets for tips one moment and in the next find you are on a fast train to stardom. Allie's dad never pushed her to perform or make music; rather, she was encouraged and supported when she wanted to perform. Be a support to those who want to perform. And I encourage you to make sure performing on the street is legal where you live. If it is…you never know when making better music on the streets will net huge rewards! –HC - Enjoy - Video: "Shallow" Lady Gaga, Bradley Cooper * Allie Sherlock cover* "Dancing on My Own" Calum Scott (Allie Sherlock cover) The Ellen Show _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  17. I once had a preacher who would say that there is nothing more certain than taxes and death*. The challenge with death is there’s nothing more uncertain as to “the” time. What is certain is when taxes are due! This Dear Musician isn’t written to stress you out, rather just the opposite. This Make Better Music issue just so happens to fall on April 15th, so I could have written about anything else; however, in an effort to encourage you to pick up an instrument, make some music, and forget about the looming midnight hour when you must have either filed or extended, I chose to write about taxes. Hang on! Now, I’m not a tax advisor nor a certified accountant**, but I have played the stage at many a Holiday Inn in my day. The one thing I have learned is that your hobby of making music could be of tax benefit to you. If you do anything with your music that nets you money, then you could be leveraging tax laws in your favor. Even if you play one show a month for $150 a show, you could be taking certain deductions for gear and other expenses that could prove advantageous. Now, it seems a shame that we can’t just make music to put a little extra change in our pockets without worry of “keeping records” — I mean, we are musicians, after all, right? We live in a country where tax laws shift and morph, and we are obligated through some form of accountability to keep up with the things that we are required to report to the Internal Revenue Service. It can be a bummer or a blessing. I mean, how great is it that you might be able to take depreciable deductions for music gear…! I encourage you at this late hour to make certain you’ve evaluated your particular situation with your accountant regarding your music scene. And, hey, if you owe…well, then pull out that instrument and play some Blues. At least you can get lost in the music and forget the woes of owes. Back to my old preacher’s saying, I like to change the thought from nothing's being more certain than taxes and death to reflect that I’ll take taxes over death any day. I'd also like to change the thought to "there’s nothing more certain than taxes and music." At least we have music. If you are scrambling today to file and I piqued some thoughts that you should dig deeper into the tax code with your accountant, and I helped you realize a better refund, then cheers! (Or at least file an extension to investigate it on a future date.) Between taxes and music, I choose music. I’m filing an extension, and now I’m off to make better music! -HC- **Neither the author nor Harmony Central makes any substantial claims regarding tax preperation or tax laws. You are encouraged to seek professional help preparing your taxes in the United States when taking deductions regarding self-employment. *Original quote attributed to Benjamin Franklin _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  18. We’re literally bombarded with music stimulus today. It’s everywhere from your phone to the elevator…even restrooms. There are two types of listening: active and passive. Active listening takes place when we are making an effort to hear something; in other words, we’re paying attention. Passive listening means we hear it, but we’re not really (actively) paying attention. My wife says I’m a master at passive listening. You know when she says, “Are you listening to me?” But then I am able to (actively) repeat back what she said verbatim—but she claims it’s passive listening. Yet I digress! What’s true about society is that because, we are indeed so bombarded, we’ve all become masters at passive listening. Musicians, however, may possess a unique skill of being able to "actively passively" listen. Sounds convoluted? Musicians develop skills over time while playing music whereby they must listen to other musicians and their instruments, as well as song lyrics. The art of listening is honed over time from this interactive process that requires listening to sounds from multiple sources that all channel together to create music. Just like exercise develops muscles and practicing your instrument makes you a better player, we inadvertently, through the activity of making music, are also exercising our aural synapsis. We as musicians are teaching ourselves to become better listeners. We are fine-tuning the ability to hear multiple sources of sound, and our brain processes all of the stimuli into a single train of thought. When we listen, our goals are to be able to obtain information, understand, and learn (in addition to listening for enjoyment). Playing with other musicians teaches us how to hone listening skills that will serve in all other areas of life: Paying Attention – When playing with a group of musicians, you learn to put away distraction. You learn that listening is a key element of the communication (even unstated) that it takes to be a good musician. Acknowledgement – Part of being a great musician is the ability to convey through eye contact that you are listening to the other musicians. It will be apparent that you are listening because the others see you making eye contact with them. Providing Feedback and Responses – As a musician, you learn not to “step on” other people’s parts. You learn that rests are as important as notes. You also learn how to clarify how songs are structured and work out differences of opinions through listening to one another. You’ll also learn quickly that you catch more flies with honey (as they say), meaning you learn to craft good communication skills, and you also learn to pick your battles. You learn through listening how to defer judgment and how to respond appropriately. When I was a young man, my father would often say, “You were born with two ears and one mouth, and it was intended that you use them in that proportion.” While I knew at the time it was his way of telling me to quit talking and listen to him, I still reflect on that statement to this day. I think as a musician you have to be a good listener in order to refine your craft. I believe that the more we open our ears, the more elements within the music we hear. Better listeners often become better people in much the same way better listeners become better musicians. Does making music make you a better listener? We say yes! So, listen up—be inspired to go make better music! -HC- _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  19. During the past two weeks, two people tagged me on social media about two different articles regarding music and intelligence. I don’t know if the fact that I’m a musician prompted the tagging, as I certainly doubt I come across as the intellectual type. The title of one of the articles is Studies Show That If You’re A Drummer…You’re A Little Bit Smarter Than Everyone Else. Of course, being a drummer, I could raise my hand and state with enthusiasm—it’s true! But, it's with humility that I’d simply say, "Thanks for the vote of confidence!" In the article a cited a study showing that drummers not only exhibited a greater level of intelligence and teamwork but also had a higher pain threshold, as well. The second article is titled The Benefits of Playing Music Help Your Brain More Than Any Other Activity and was presented by Inc. Magazine. This article points to several studies regarding brain development in humans, and, how in musicians, science has proven that musical training can change brain structure and function for the better. The article even points out that even if you are no longer playing a musical instrument, but once did, you have lasting benefits. The article further points to some facts that we (as musicians) most likely already realize: Playing music strengthens bonds with others. As we like to say, makes you a good team player! Being a musician strengthens memory and reading skills. As we know, these attributes also reduce the risks of dementia later in life. Playing music makes you happy – well, duh. Most of us didn’t start playing music because we thought we’d get rich doing so. Many of us realized that we need to make a decent living and parlayed our love of music into a career in the music industry. But the happiness and joy making music brings cannot be denied. Musicians can process multiple things at once. For certain, we know this comes as a benefit that can carry over into every aspect of a musician’s life, as multi-tasking skills are honed and refined setting you up for success in life. Music increases blood flow to your brain. Forget the 5-Hour energy drink – play music! Music helps the brain recover. I know that the article refers to motor skills from an injury (brain or body), but I believe music can help you recover from myriad challenges – from physical to emotional. Music reduces stress and depression. Music is simply a great way to get in your cardio, which in turn will start to melt your stress away. It also can stimulate endorphins, which help lift your spirits and reduce depression. Want to feel better? Play music! Musical training strengthens the brain’s executive function. These developing traits will help you become a better decision maker and leader. You’ll approach challenges in life with the ability to see multiple solutions. This will serve you both on stage and at work. Music makes you smarter, or at least that’s what they say. With all these fantastic attributes music brings, don’t you at least feel smarter? And at the very least, you should be inspired to make better music! –HC- _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
  20. Throughout my career, I’ve had the pleasure of knowing many great drummers. While I respect them all, I’ve never been a drummer who was impressed by flashy playing and mega-chops. I was more into how the drums relate to the music. I loved that the song, but the drums were the parts of the music that drew me in. I grew up in an A.M. radio era until the late 70s when I got my first F.M. stereo. The legendary Hal Blaine played most of the songs served on A.M. during this era. Hal was part of The Wrecking Crew. They were the “hit makers” musicians of the day, and the discography of songs that Hal performed on is seemingly endless. If Hal Blaine had been able to recoup the enormous amount of money he left on the table by providing drum lessons for many of us “want to be” drummers, he’d have been a rich, rich man. He never sat with any of us and taught us directly; rather, he simply taught us by the music we listened to – and influenced our playing to this day. Hal was simply the most-recorded drummer in the history of the music industry, with claims of over 35,000 recording sessions, 6,000 plus singles, and close to 50 number 1 hits by an amazing range of artists. Seems hard to believe, so here’s a list of some of those hits as provided by Wikipedia: Drummed on over 40 recordings that hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100, including: "Johnny Angel" –Shelley Fabares "He's a Rebel" –The Crystals "Surf City" –Jan & Dean "I Get Around" –The Beach Boys "Everybody Loves Somebody" –Dean Martin "Ringo" –Lorne Greene "This Diamond Ring" –Gary Lewis & the Playboys "Help Me, Rhonda" –The Beach Boys "Mr Tambourine Man" –The Byrds "Eve of Destruction" –Barry McGuire "My Love" –Petula Clark "These Boots Are Made for Walkin'" –Nancy Sinatra "Monday Monday" –The Mamas & the Papas "Strangers in the Night" –Frank Sinatra "Poor Side of Town" –Johnny Rivers "Good Vibrations" –The Beach Boys "Somethin' Stupid" –Frank & Nancy Sinatra "The Happening" –The Supremes "Windy" –The Association " Robinson" –Simon & Garfunkel "Dizzy" –Tommy Roe "Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In" –The 5th Dimension "Love Theme from Romeo and Juliet" –Henry Mancini "Wedding Bell Blues" –The 5th Dimension "Bridge Over Troubled Water" –Simon & Garfunkel "(They Long to Be) Close to You" –The Carpenters "Cracklin' Rosie" –Neil Diamond "I Think I Love You" –The Partridge Family "Indian Reservation" –The Raiders "Song Sung Blue" –Neil Diamond "Half Breed" –Cher "Annie's Song" –John Denver "Top of the World" –The Carpenters "The Way We Were" –Barbra Streisand "Thank God I'm a Country Boy" –John Denver "Love Will Keep Us Together" –Captain & Tennille "I'm Sorry"/"Calypso" –John Denver "Theme from Mahogany (Do You Know Where You're Going To)" –Diana Ross Sadly, we lost Hal this past week on March 11, 2019. He was 90 years old. You may have seen the news and, if you weren’t a drummer, didn’t think it impacted you. But if you love music, Hal Blaine touched you as well. Drummers and musicians everywhere are remembering Hal. –HC- Video Resources: The Wrecking Crew - Facebook Page Video Online Resources: Drum! Magazine - Remembering Hal Blaine Modern Drummer Magazine: Hal Blaine _________________________________________________________________ Dendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Executive Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.
×
×
  • Create New...