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Ten things you could be doing wrong when recording at home...

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  • Ten things you could be doing wrong when recording at home...

    This article over on Reverb makes some very good points.

    https://reverb.com/news/10-things-yo...rding-at-home?

    Which, if any, of these things are you guilty of?

    **********

    "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
    - George Carlin

    "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
    - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

    "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
    - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

  • #2
    Luckily I don't do too many of these things..

    I'm probably most guilty of "poor file management" and not using an external backup, which I'm intending to do soon.

    File management has been getting better lately because my file naming scheme is becoming more specific. But since I go through so many different versions of mixes and songs, sometimes it is difficult to distinguish between project files of the same song. Occasionally I might create a text file that describes each version, but hard to get into the habit of doing it.

    What would be a good method of doing backup? Right now I have an old laptop HDD (700gb @5400rpm) that I put inside of a external drive enclosure, which I am planning on using for backup. Would a smaller but faster SSD be better? Or do you think HDD is okay? The final versions of each of my projects tend to range between 1 to 2 gb of space taken up.
    Moderator - Vocals and Voiceovers Forum
    Follow me on Twitter and Soundcloud

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    • #3
      good stuff...and the whole plug-in dependency thing...I am gradually weaning my partner off of all the plug-ins...he never met a plug-in he didn't like [and downloaded]. I sent him a link to the article...
      "We are currently experiencing some technical difficulties due to reality fluctuations. The elves are working tirelessly to patch the correct version of reality. Activities here have been temporarily disabled since the fundamentals of mathematics, physics and reason may be incomprehensible during this indeterminate period of instability. Normal service will be restored once we are certain as to what 'normal' is."

      Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally used up and worn out, shouting '...man, what a ride!'

      "The greatness of a man is not in how much wealth he acquires, but in his integrity and his ability to affect those around him positively" ~Bob Marley

      Solipsism is the new empiricism. -Alan Burdick

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      • #4
        Id like to see a 10 things you could be doing correctly
        when recording at home article

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        • #5
          Originally posted by davie View Post
          Luckily I don't do too many of these things..

          I'm probably most guilty of "poor file management" and not using an external backup, which I'm intending to do soon.
          The first time you lose data and can't get it back, you'll become a believer in backups and saving often.

          File management has been getting better lately because my file naming scheme is becoming more specific. But since I go through so many different versions of mixes and songs, sometimes it is difficult to distinguish between project files of the same song. Occasionally I might create a text file that describes each version, but hard to get into the habit of doing it.
          I incorporate dates in my file names, and then use letters to specify various revisions that are done throughout any particular day:


          "Song Name 12-4-18 c.PTX" is a file / version that was saved later in the day than "Song Name 12-4-18 b.PTX"


          What would be a good method of doing backup? Right now I have an old laptop HDD (700gb @5400rpm) that I put inside of a external drive enclosure, which I am planning on using for backup. Would a smaller but faster SSD be better? Or do you think HDD is okay? The final versions of each of my projects tend to range between 1 to 2 gb of space taken up.
          I am currently using external USB and Firewire hard disk drives. I save files regularly throughout the day, and then at the end of the day, I back everything up to an external drive. I also will often make a third copy to yet another external drive, which the client will often take off-site... but only if their account is paid up to date. Otherwise, it stays here. As far as SSD vs HDD, I am still using HDD's for the backups, although I do have a SSD as my boot drive, and I am going to be installing another SSD to supplement my three internal HDD's later today after UPS delivers it... along with another 16GB of RAM, which will bring my DAW up to a full 32GB.

          **********

          "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
          - George Carlin

          "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
          - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

          "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
          - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post

            The first time you lose data and can't get it back, you'll become a believer in backups and saving often.
            Yep, I just backed up my most recent projects this morning using that external HDD.

            I incorporate dates in my file names, and then use letters to specify various revisions that are done throughout any particular day:


            "Song Name 12-4-18 c.PTX" is a file / version that was saved later in the day than "Song Name 12-4-18 b.PTX"
            Yeah, I've doing a similar filenaming scheme as well. Song-name2018-12-05A.. as the project file into a folder with the same name.

            I am currently using external USB and Firewire hard disk drives. I save files regularly throughout the day, and then at the end of the day, I back everything up to an external drive. I also will often make a third copy to yet another external drive, which the client will often take off-site... but only if their account is paid up to date. Otherwise, it stays here. As far as SSD vs HDD, I am still using HDD's for the backups, although I do have a SSD as my boot drive, and I am going to be installing another SSD to supplement my three internal HDD's later today after UPS delivers it... along with another 16GB of RAM, which will bring my DAW up to a full 32GB.
            I just upgraded my RAM from 8GB to 16GB last year. Recently I've been noticing on the average project I would get close to hitting the 8GB mark in memory usage from the DAW alone. This usually happens when I'm running multiple instances of virtual instruments. I've managed to ease up by bouncing those tracks into waveform, using more live instruments, and being more minimalistic with my plug-in use, opting for channel strips (like SSL-e) over using multiple plug-ins. I also found that the more I focus on recording sound sources properly, the less I need to use plug-ins to adjust the sound ITB.

            Moderator - Vocals and Voiceovers Forum
            Follow me on Twitter and Soundcloud

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            • #7
              Originally posted by davie View Post
              I just upgraded my RAM from 8GB to 16GB last year. Recently I've been noticing on the average project I would get close to hitting the 8GB mark in memory usage from the DAW alone. This usually happens when I'm running multiple instances of virtual instruments. I've managed to ease up by bouncing those tracks into waveform, using more live instruments, and being more minimalistic with my plug-in use, opting for channel strips (like SSL-e) over using multiple plug-ins. I also found that the more I focus on recording sound sources properly, the less I need to use plug-ins to adjust the sound ITB.

              I use the disk cache feature in Pro Tools and typically dedicate 6-8GB of RAM to that. It pre-loads all the waveform / audio track files into RAM instead of trying to stream them off the HDD, and makes disk speed issues irrelevant. Typically, that's enough for me to load everything in. However, if you use a lot of virtual instruments, or a lot of tracks (I typically don't need or use more than 32-64) you might need even more RAM. So while my current 16GB is "usually" enough, I figured I might as well upgrade now and get it over with rather than wait until later and risk having a hard time locating the same make / model RAM as the other two 8GB sticks that I already have installed.

              My quad core i7 MacBook Pro is already maxed out - it's supposed to only be able to handle 8GB, but it actually is capable of handling 16GB, which is what I have installed in it.

              I personally currently consider 8GB to be the minimum that people should be using with most modern DAW programs. 4GB is not enough anymore, and 16GB is much better if you can swing it. 32GB is probably overkill for most folks unless they work with very long / large sessions with a lot of tracks, use a lot of virtual instruments, and / or use large sample libraries extensively.

              **********

              "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
              - George Carlin

              "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
              - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

              "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
              - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

              Comment


              • #8
                I think the practices I was shown and the ones I picked up for myself in years of mostly video editing paid off when applied to audio projects. Sparing the details, I mean things about having a steady procedure of workflow across 3 or more drives, folder organization, that kind of thing. Now I also apply them to website assets.
                Having to collaborate with someone else sure points out any weakness in organization. If no one is watching and I work on my own, I can spend half an hour looking for that one missing track or raw clip I was careless with. However, I strive for the "big bus" philosophy. If I was hit by a big bus some sunny day, could someone else carry on with the work I started?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post
                  I personally currently consider 8GB to be the minimum that people should be using with most modern DAW programs. 4GB is not enough anymore,
                  Phooey. Granted it's limiting but it can be done. I'm doing it, albeit with a small # of tracks at the moment. And I would certainly not recommend it to anyone about to buy a PC, agreed 8GB at least. Anyway...

                  Shockingly I'm not doing any of those things, although using plugins properly is always a work in progress. IMO the most common mistake is using too many or using them too heavily. More isn't better.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bill5 View Post
                    Phooey. Granted it's limiting but it can be done. I'm doing it, albeit with a small # of tracks at the moment. And I would certainly not recommend it to anyone about to buy a PC, agreed 8GB at least. Anyway...
                    That's a good point - If you have fast disk drives and don't need a lot of tracks or a lot of plugins or virtual instruments, then yes, you could get by with less than 8GB of RAM. Someone who is recording something like live classical recitals or basic guitar / vocal or piano / vocal songwriting demos isn't going to need the track counts and plugins that someone recording pop or rock records, or EDM / dance music is going to need.

                    Shockingly I'm not doing any of those things, although using plugins properly is always a work in progress. IMO the most common mistake is using too many or using them too heavily. More isn't better.

                    **********

                    "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
                    - George Carlin

                    "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
                    - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                    "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
                    - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

                    Comment

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