Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

A great melody first, then lyrics,(only) THEN 'vocals'

Collapse
X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • When I was no more than two-years-old my mother said I fell in love with the music of LeRoy Anderson. In those days you'd hear his best work on radio -- especially "The Typewriter Song" (which my own grandchildren loved when they were little).



    I would later learn that Mr. Anderson wrote some major instrumental hit recordings of the 50s Blue Tango and the seasonal classic, Sleigh Ride. I didn't know any composer names, and according to my mother, when I fell in love with the melody of STRIKE UP THE BAND, I would hum it, she said, "while marching around the house." I probably thought it was a LeRoy Anderson song! Much later I learned that one had lyrics, and was written by "The Gershwins."



    Satellite radio is playing my all-time favorite version: Tony Bennett & the Basie Band. It's never at YouTube. But lo and behold, it is today! uploaded a year ago by a kindred spirit (to 648 "views", 4 likes and 0 dislikes):



    Uploaded by MrGavinTwinge on Sep 22, 2011

    Tony Bennett's Strike Up The Band.



    I can't believe there is none in youtube at the moment.



    I do not own this song or the copyright to it.









    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAxMRTcfxQM





    On page 224 of his book, Lyrics on Several Occasions, George Gershwin's older brother Ira recalls how the music came to him "on the fifth try."



    "Late one weekend night, in the spring of 1927, I got to my hotel room with the Sunday papers. I looked for a slit of light under the door of the adjoining room but no light, so I figured my brother was asleep. (We were in Atlantic City for Strike Up the Band discussions with producer Edgar Selwin.)



    "I hadn't finished the paper's first section when the door opened and my pajamaed brother appeared.



    "I thought you were asleep."



    "No," he said, "I've been lying in bed thinking . . . and I think I've got it!"



    "Got what?"



    "Why the march, of course. Come on in!"



    It was off season, and with no guests to disturb within ten rooms of us, the hotel had sent up an upright piano. He played the refrain of the march, practically as it is today. In the previous four weeks, he'd written four different versions and he assured me that this was it. He wouldn't change his mind again. Interestingly though, the first four versions had been written on the piano; the fifth and final came to him while lying in bed.

    Comment


    • I've always like "Strike Up the Band" better as an instrumental (no dis to Ira).



      Here's a version you might like, Mark. Performed by fellow Canadian musicians/music lovers.






      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7r1ZIR38fFY





      And though this clip suffers a little in the sound quality department, it's quite a treat to see George himself playing the tune.






      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ZzsH37nUA8
      “Good Vibrations” was probably a good record but who's to know? You had to play it about 90 bloody times to even hear what they were singing about. What’s next? Rock opera? —Pete Townshend, Melody Maker Interview, 1966.

      Comment


      • No complaints and no regrets:

        I still believe in chasing dreams and placing bets;

        for I have learned that,

        all you give is all you get!

        So give it all you

        Comment


        • As if to say

          Comment


          • Beautiful.



            Is this the song Miss Peggy Lee co-wrote with Maestro Johnny Mandel?






            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ENtY9Rv3U0k
            “Good Vibrations” was probably a good record but who's to know? You had to play it about 90 bloody times to even hear what they were singing about. What’s next? Rock opera? —Pete Townshend, Melody Maker Interview, 1966.

            Comment


            • All of us are bound to have at least one of those

              Comment


              • A few brilliant, yet little-known Johnny Mercer songs...



                "Conversation While Dancing," Words & Music, Johnny Mercer & Paul Weston.






                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fsyUTN9Luxc





                "Yodel Blues," from the musical Texas, Li'l Darlin', Words & Music, Johnny Mercer & Robert Emmett Dolan.






                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8W7vUZy1W0k





                "Love's Got Me in a Lazy Mood," words & music by Johnny Mercer and Eddie Miller.






                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFPQjH-ku98





                "If You Were Mine," Teddy Wilson's Orchestra with Billie Holiday. By Johnny Mercer & Matty Malneck.






                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gUHP7H_Gsos





                "I Fought Every Step of the Way," sung by Rose Marie. Words & Music by Johnny Mercer.






                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYWcwPMArXg
                “Good Vibrations” was probably a good record but who's to know? You had to play it about 90 bloody times to even hear what they were singing about. What’s next? Rock opera? —Pete Townshend, Melody Maker Interview, 1966.

                Comment


                • Thank you, Lee -- for taking the time and trouble to post those five "little-known" Johnny Mercer lyrics. Would you believe I never heard any of them before now? I came here to post about another lyricist you and I love -- Dorothy Fields.



                  Younger readers here may be be forgiven for not knowing the name of the first successful

                  Comment


                  • The

                    Comment


                    • Mark... escape this place... join us here: http://hcsf.freeforums.net/index.cgi

                      Comment


                      • Suddenly the 'disaster' here at our favorite "song writing" site is passed . . . and our sense of perspective rudely restored by an "unimaginable" natural disaster. For those of us with friends in New Jersey and the New York area -- we're hoping and praying that you are all right -- and that we'll hear from you soon.



                        ----



                        I came here today to reflect on two great old Broadway ballads (my favorites from the year I was born) just released as a medley on Streisand's new album "Release Me (from the vaults)" (currently No. 1 sales ranked in two music categories at Amazon). Someone's posted a video "with lyrics" that may hurt more than help anyone unfamiliar with terms like "toora-looro-ly."



                        We may all of us be forgiven not knowing an ancient "Anglo-Irish greeting that means, "See you later." But Google the approximate spelling, and instantly learn that,





                        Tir"ra*lir`ra, n. A verbal imitation of a musical sound, as of the

                        note of a lark or a horn.



                        "The lark, that tirra lyra chants." --Shakespeare



                        "'Tirralira,' by the river, Sang Sir Lancelot." --Tennyson.





                        The kind soul who first posted Streisand's newly released medley of How Are Things in Glocca Morra (Finian's Rainbow) and The Heather on the Hill (Brigadoon) included a well-meaning but less than literate transcription of the words. Where Yip Harburg's original lyric uses a once-common phrase "It well may be" (as in)



                        It well may be (he`s bringing me a cheering word)



                        the transcription reads,



                        it, well, maybe he`s bringing me . . .



                        (an error compounded in the next line the opening verse of Glocca Morra)



                        It, well, maybe it's followed me across the sea.



                        (and then, "to each lad who comes a whislin' toora-lay" (becomes) "a whistling to relay." (!)



                        In part two of the medley Heather on the Hill, the early Anglo-Irish term for a very small brook or stream -- `rill (rhymes with hill) the baffled transcriber substituted `rain (though it obviously doesn`t rhyme!) As in,



                        There`s lazy music in the rill (becomes in the rain)



                        And that laddie calling toora lay (becomes) laddy calling to relay



                        This was recorded in 1985 for Streisand`s multi-platinum (4 million copies sold) `Broadway` album but not released until this month. No matter what you may say about Streisand (and who doesn`t) this is Broadway best ballads well sung, and beautifully arranged by Peter Matz, an Oscar-nominated composer who died ten years ago, age 73 of cancer. Trivia note: Peter Matz was musical director for my favorite composer`s final Broadway show, `No Strings for which Dick Rodgers wrote both words & music.



                        (Still unable to embed this video; hope this link is worth your while!)



                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgo34...eature=related

                        Comment


                        • Have you ever posted this song, Mark? Not this version, necessarily, but the song itself?



                          I've had it running through my mind lately.



                          A French tune, written in 1942, it became popular after being used as a sort of title song for Fran
                          “Good Vibrations” was probably a good record but who's to know? You had to play it about 90 bloody times to even hear what they were singing about. What’s next? Rock opera? —Pete Townshend, Melody Maker Interview, 1966.

                          Comment


                          • A couple of lesser-known Hoagy Carmichael songs.



                            "Memphis in June," lyric by Paul Francis Webster.






                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZnwIMw8emc





                            "The Old Music Master," lyric by Johnny Mercer.






                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAJJc1ce2zg





                            "How Little We Know," lyric by Johnny Mercer.






                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZdCBj2NBHY





                            "Doctor, Lawyer & Indian Chief," lyric by Paul Francis Webster.






                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-bXOEw8VzzI





                            "Winter Moon," lyric by Hoagy Carmichael.






                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kURFOPxqSkY





                            "New Orleans," lyric by Hoagy Carmichael.






                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bzfq3TQIefQ
                            “Good Vibrations” was probably a good record but who's to know? You had to play it about 90 bloody times to even hear what they were singing about. What’s next? Rock opera? —Pete Townshend, Melody Maker Interview, 1966.

                            Comment


                            • I've tried posting 3 X -- with embedded videos -- over the past seven days. Keep being booted out when I hit "submit." Grrrrrr

                              Comment


                              • 77 years ago (November 1935) Rodgers & Hart's LITTLE GIRL BLUE was introduced in the Broadway musical

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X