Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Mark Blackburn

A great melody first, then lyrics,(only) THEN 'vocals'

Recommended Posts

Time for one of us to compose a new twist to the oldest 'theme' of all: Girls & Boys and vivre la difference . . .

Trapped in my car in a downpour with only my trusty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I awoke this morning (sounds like a good song title) I was thinking about the most poignant words any of us will ever hear: gentle, kind-sounding words that really break young and vulnerable (male) hearts: as when she gives you back the ring and says,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote Originally Posted by Surrealistic View Post
You are SO right Lee. I mean, just compare Mercer's lyrics to some more modern masterpieces such as those from the pen of Freddy Mercury (RIP):

more from Mercury..

"So dear friends
your love is gone
Only tears to dwell upon
I dare not say where the wind must blow
So a love is lost, a love is won...

Go to sleep and dream again
Soon your hopes will rise and then
From all this gloom life can start anew,
And there'll be no crying soon..

or..

You suck my blood like a leech
You break the law and you preach
Screw my brain till it hurts
You

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for me, lyric before melody tends to result in more complex and layered, but less easily accessible songs, while music and lyrics together (ad libbed) tend to be simple, straightforward, and generally zooms in on a single emotion or viewpoint. my songs i like to sing the most were generally ad libbed, while the ones i like to play the most are generally written. also, if i write the lyrics first, there's usually some nagging part of me that really hates the song and another that really loves it, but the ad libbed ones don't evoke that in me.

 

if i write the music first, i don't generally end up writing any lyrics. i can write 5 songs a day of music, but lyrics tend to come to me irregularly.

i always write lyrics, not necessarily with a melody or structure in mind, but with a musicality and rhythm to the words.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While watching Nadal win a five-setter (at the "English Lawn Tennis Club") a few minutes ago, I looked up "Freddie (with an "ie" not a 'Y') Mercury" in my well-thumbed, 1994 edition of arranger Dick Jacobs' "WHO WROTE THAT SONG?" [best book of its kind, compiled by the fellow who arranged Buddy Holly's version of the best song ever written by Paul Anka, "It Doesn't Matter Anymore."

[indulge me in an aside, please: Paul Anka, who grew up in my hometown of Ottawa, was actually named by my "Aunt Ding." His Lebanese Christian parents, who lived above their corner grocery store -- unable to think of a name for their new-born -- asked their friend "Ding" for her opinion: she looked into his crib and pronounced with apparent authority, "He's a Paul." The singer/composer would always made a point of looking her up, whenever he visited his home town.

Where was I? Oh yes. I see Mr. Mercury (IF that's his real name) wrote a song in 1979 which even this dinosaur recalls hearing on radio (at least its catchy refrain): "Crazy Little Thing Called Love" -- a "Number 1 chart song for Freddie's band QUEEN."

I further note, Freddie Mercury wrote BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY -- one that reached these old ears via Canadian comic actor Mike Myers ("voice of SHREK") in that movie he did with fellow 'Saturday Night Live' alumnus Dana Carvey. Remember? The two "Wayne's World" idiots, are pulling in to a burger joint supposedly named after Chicago Black Hawks star Stan Makita -- and they're singing the song in frenetic unison in the car (or am I misremembering? Can you tell that I never heard Queen's original rendition of "Bohemian Rhapsody"?)

You can never dismiss ANY performer who makes it to Number 1 on the charts, in any era. They deserve at least our admiration. May one of us here have a Number 1 chart record one fine day. Here's to you, Freddie M.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tomorrow, June 28, marks the anniversary of the birth of my favorite composer, Richard Rodgers. A long-time New York cabaret artist (the late) pianist and singer Bobby Short once declared (in a PBS special celebrating Rodgers & Hart and Rodgers & Hammerstein ) that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First an admission: Watching "DANCING WITH THE STARS" (an 8 year tradition with my wife, and about the only television viewing we share when it's in season) is about as close as I get to dancing these days.

No, I

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Quote Originally Posted by Mark Blackburn

View Post

the song was written by Jesse Winchester, a Canadian citizen who now resides in Virginia; (his own version, introduced as

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"The people that we never get to love . . ."

I was browsing in the grocery store today (sounds like the opening line of a song?) and, to my expressed disappointment, (a big sigh), they were all out of my favorite

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...