Harmony Central Forums
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Looks like I'm gonna try and build a guitar...

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse









X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts







  • Quote Originally Posted by kwakatak
    View Post

    Thanks! It's still pretty rough-looking so it may not work out. I have more mahogany and walnut to give it another go if need-be. If it does work out OK then I'll still make another neck. That'll give me the justification to do another MJ. I'm thinking EIR and lutz.



    As for #1 here, after some cleanup of the channels and filling in an oopsie or two with cedar I'm looking forward to doing the binding.



    BTW, I'm stocking up on sandpaper in anticipation of final sanding. I've got 80, 100, 120, 150, 180, 220, 320, 400, and 600 grit. I also want to give the cabinet scraper another go.




    I think the neck is going to be nice - we don't see multipiece necks on acoustics often enough.



    and fwiw, I don't go all the steps (usually 120, 150, 180, 220 and 320 in a garnet paper which is where I start finishing). Each three coats gets scruffed back with 320 or 400. At the end I'll start with 600 wet and dry (wet) and go to 2000 before the final polish.



    A friend just brought his first build over the this weekend - he finished with rattle cans of lacquer and said he had put 15 coats on. In my opinion that was not enough, he did sand through and feels that he'll have to go back and spray some more. I think I usually end up with 18 or so coats on spruce and 24 or more on the back and sides. You can also build with satin lacquer - it has more solids and goes on thicker.

    Comment


    • Sweet, Neil. Sweet.

      Comment


      • Tonight I cleaned up the end wedge:















        I know: it's not perfect but given that this is my first and it's for me I'd say it's "good enough." I already know what I'm going to do differently next time: do the wedge just after gluing in the blocks just like that O'Brien guy on Youtube says to do. He makes it look soooo easy.



        I also glued up the neck blank. I'll take pics when it's presentable; there's lots of glue slop and I need to trim all the rough cuts to match the target profile.
        Cornelius Clodhopper

        Comment


        • Looks good to me, man. Great job!
          --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          My guitar projects: http://diystrat.blogspot.com

          Comment


          • Nice work Neil.



            The end wedge (or butt graft in Freeman lingo) on mine came out sloppy in comparison.



            By the way, I dig the center strip on the back!



            -A
            Stop anthropomorphizing things. They don't like it.

            StewMac Ukulele
            StewMac 000-R

            SAWG Society

            Comment








            • Quote Originally Posted by melandy
              View Post

              Nice work Neil.



              The end wedge (or butt graft in Freeman lingo) on mine came out sloppy in comparison.



              By the way, I dig the center strip on the back!





              -A




              I'm sure it's fine, melandy. If I'd done the wedge before I'd even glued on the kerfing then I'd have been better-able to mark the centerline. If you look though, the wedge and the strip don't line up. The strip is in fact not perfectly centered (it's about 1/16" off) and one side of the wedge's trench was not straight so I had to graft an EIR shard to fill it.



              BTW, thanks for the compliment on my "skunk stripe." It's flamed mahogany and is actually a little more honey-colored than the pictures convey. I wanted something a little different than the rosewood I'm using for the rosette, wede and trim because I thought a dark strip would spoil the outline of the guitar and look like it was chopping it in half. The mahogany already has some natural figuring that I found to be reminiscent of the Martin 35 series. In fact, the pronounced lines in the back are so deep that the black fill I plan on using to fill the pores may come out as being completely black.
              Cornelius Clodhopper

              Comment








              • Quote Originally Posted by kwakatak
                View Post

                If I'd done the wedge before I'd even glued on the kerfing then I'd have been better-able to mark the centerline.




                Not sure how that would work. You want a pretty rigid body to support the sawing you'd need to do on the butt, don't you? The only real problem I had with mine was the razor saw skipped while I was cutting, so I needed to clean up that saw mark.
                Frog Rock Tenor Uke
                Frog Rock 00-12
                The thing with Chinese guitars is that when I play one, half an hour later I want to play it again... -- Knockwood
                If you know who wrote it, it ain't folk music. -- DHone
                Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts. -- Richard Feynman
                De recta non tolerandum sunt. -- Monty Python

                Comment


                • Looking good, K-man.



                  I insert the end graft right after the kerfing is glued in. It's plenty rigid enough because you're only going at the portion of the sides attached to the bigass tail block. The good thing about doing it before the top and back plates are attached is that you can very easily position the thing so that it's comfortable for you to work on and it's also easy to flip it around and get to everywhere you need to get.



                  On #2, I had a router fu*kup that made it necessary to remove & replace my previously installed graft. That was a pain in the ass.
                  I guess I kinda lost control, because in the middle of the play I ran up and lit the evil puppet villain on fire. No, I didn't. Just kidding. I just said that to help illustrate one of the human emotions, which is freaking out. Another emotion is greed, as when you kill someone for money, or something like that. Another emotion is generosity, as when you pay someone double what he paid for his stupid puppet.I.K.F.C.E.S.C.Potato SocietySAWG

                  Comment


                  • I haven't been able to get to my friend's shop and have been sitting on some extra wood to make laminated necks so I went and cut out some plies the other nights. This time around I used the original 3/4" x 24" x 6" Honduran mahogany board I bought last year along with more 1/4" maple and a spare cut of 1/4" walnut. As you can see, the Honduran is much darker and IMO denser. If I don't use it this time around I could see it matched up with rosewood back & sides:







                    My little 9" Ryobi bandsaw has a new blade but I think I dulled it when I cut out the 1/4" maple ply on the last neck. I did a little better accommodating for the volute:







                    No, it's not glued up yet. All my clamps are still on the first one so all I have are 2 longer ones that I bought to repair some furniture in my house. There are a few things I want to address first anyway. First is the truss rod slot. On the first attempt I didn't rout out or cut for the truss rod, but I 'm weighing on cutting the top 3/8" off the central 1/4" ply to accommodate it. FWIW the boards I've used are S4S so that the fingerboard face and tenon sides are perfectly flat - at least they are in relation to the steel table on my little bandsaw.







                    There's also a lot of extra wood around where the tenon will be. I could potentially save myself a lot of work - or set myself up for a colossal failure - if I cut away at the area beforehand. According to my plans, the three inner layers are all I'll need - but it come down to the actual dimensions of the pre-cut mortise in my neck block. I won't be able to measure that until after I finish the body binding and rout away the sides in that area though.



                    ...then there's the headstock. This time around I traced the inner walnut ply instead of the clear plastic template so there's a little extra all around. The plans leave some extra space to work with so maybe THIS won't be an issue. Just in case, I measure the headstock thickness on my Martin D-16GT just to be sure and I think I'm OK:



                    Cornelius Clodhopper

                    Comment


                    • Looks great. I gotta try that. I already have a few mahogany boards, but I need to find the stuff for the racing stripe down the middle.
                      Frog Rock Tenor Uke
                      Frog Rock 00-12
                      The thing with Chinese guitars is that when I play one, half an hour later I want to play it again... -- Knockwood
                      If you know who wrote it, it ain't folk music. -- DHone
                      Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts. -- Richard Feynman
                      De recta non tolerandum sunt. -- Monty Python

                      Comment


                      • All you need to look for is 1/4" S4S boards of riftsawn maple, walnut, cherry, whatever that's at least 5" x 24". I got mine from Rockler. The darker board of hog I actually found at a lumber just a couple miles from home. They use it for cabinet making.
                        Cornelius Clodhopper

                        Comment


                        • Last night I went over to Kitchen Guitars to work on my stuff for a little bit. I didn't have a plan and I have to figure out how much purfling I'm going to need so I decided to play it safe and just bend the rosewood binding strips. Things appeared to go smoothly and I didn't hear any cracking but after I unplugged the heating blanket I opted to just leave everything sit until I return on Wednesday. My friend John had never bent EIR before and noted that it smell funky or something like that. I kinda liked it: not so funky as patchouli or sandlewood but still what I'd call exotic. It's subtly peppery to the palette but not overly pungent.







                          After that I collected my glued-up neck blank and the 6 F-clamps that I was missing in order to glue up neck blank #2. I admired the job I did and marveled at the tap tone of the neck as well. There's a lot of cutting yet to do though, so I broke out the blueprints and the tools and got to work marking up the lay of the land tonight.







                          Firstly, I marked where the 15 degree break angle for the headstock is to go. Ironically, the plans also call for 15" from the end of the tenon to that point :











                          Then I moved on to marking up the tenon. A lot of the mahogany in that area is going to be cut/chiseled away. Here, I marked where the "cheeks" will be chiseled out. Everything between there and the end of the neck blank will be cut away with my band saw:























                          Meanwhile, once I have the headstock planed flat I'll move on to gluing on the headstock wings:







                          Next up though, gluing up neck blank #2. It will be tricky lining up the pieces since I pre-cut for the truss rod but then again things didn't line up exactly the first time either.
                          Cornelius Clodhopper

                          Comment


                          • I've never dealt with wings, but wouldn't you want to glue them on first and then plane the whole kit and kaboodle?
                            Frog Rock Tenor Uke
                            Frog Rock 00-12
                            The thing with Chinese guitars is that when I play one, half an hour later I want to play it again... -- Knockwood
                            If you know who wrote it, it ain't folk music. -- DHone
                            Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts. -- Richard Feynman
                            De recta non tolerandum sunt. -- Monty Python

                            Comment








                            • Quote Originally Posted by gitnoob
                              View Post

                              I've never dealt with wings, but wouldn't you want to glue them on first and then plane the whole kit and kaboodle?




                              Maybe, but I'm new to this and I couldn't really figure a way to mark the 15 degree angle on the side of the wings so I figured that I'd get everything flush in the middle then put tape on the surface then glue the wings so that they're proud of the surface and run it through my friend's planer table.
                              Cornelius Clodhopper

                              Comment


                              • Nothing helpful to add except that this is awesome to see and I'm stoked for you, kwak.

                                Comment



                                Working...
                                X