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OT-Mixing question


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gubu wrote:

I kind of knew you'd disagree, Anton
:D

And I do plenty of major saves before I'm ready to commit too. But I'd still call that the first mix, unless I'd started from scratch with a radically different approach to the track in the meantime.


For me anyway, the reverbs that I select during the first hour, along with the ballpark EQs, and general feel and design of the mix, are always pretty much done. Once I start fiddling around making major changes, it's either a case of having to start from scratch (mix #2), or having to go back to the beginning of mix #1.


Mix #3 is where I usually start to notice the law of diminishing returns coming into effect.





 

Since we were talking about Bruce earlier, I'll use him as an example - I have some mixes he sent me that are in the 40s to 70s in terms of version numbers - IOW, he does a LOT of versions before he is satisfied. However, that can be taken to extremes too. He mixed Billie Jean over 90 times, and at Quincy's suggestion, they went back and re-listened to mix #2 - and it slayed everyone. That's the mix on the album.

I'm constantly saving versions of things as I go along. I date and number everything as part of the file name so that I can go back to earlier versions if I want / need to.

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Red Ant wrote:

^ it's my pleasure, truly - music is my life, and so many people throughout my career have been so generous sharing their knowledge and experience - I feel that I can do no less!
:)

 

Good for you Anton. :smileythumbsupsmall:

I've noticed that it's the more insecure (and often less competent) folks who tend to be more secretive, while the cats who really have nothing to prove tend to have that same "share the knowledge" attitude. Guys like Roger and Bruce and George Massenburg tend to be the ones who share very liberally, and they learned it from the guys before them like Bill Putnam who shared with them as they were getting started... I'm a big believer in the whole idea of paying it forward. I've been given tons of help and advice from people like them, so I feel I have a moral responsibility to share what I can with the next generation.

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^ Preach on, brother Phil! :)

Yeah, the whole aecretive thing has always struck me as silly and insecure as well. I especially have always felt that part of my responsibility in a session was teaching the assistant/2d on the session. That's the way I was treated by most of the folks I assisted - Bob Clearmountain and all The Lord-Alge clan deserve particular mention. Paying it forward is the way to go :)

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Red Ant wrote:

^ Preach on, brother Phil!
:)

Yeah, the whole aecretive thing has always struck me as silly and insecure as well. I especially have always felt that part of my responsibility in a session was teaching the assistant/2d on the session. That's the way I was treated by most of the folks I assisted - Bob Clearmountain and all The Lord-Alge clan deserve particular mention. Paying it forward is the way to go
:)

 

Clearmountain is a prince, so is Bruce Swedien (never had any experience with Lord-Alge).

I mean that in all sincerity.

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In Clearmountain's case - and I say that with no disrespect to his considerable talents - I learned a lot of what I DIDN'T want to do. That super-crisp gated/compressed/processed Clearmountain sound just has never been my thing - but he OWNS that sound, and lots of people love it. I like a warmer, more intimate mix.

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Red Ant wrote:

In Clearmountain's case - and I say that with no disrespect to his considerable talents - I learned a lot of what I DIDN'T want to do. That super-crisp gated/compressed/processed Clearmountain sound just has never been my thing - but he OWNS that sound, and lots of people love it. I like a warmer, more intimate mix.

 

I have personally had the same exact "lesson" from Mr.C

 

 

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So many replies I couldn't read all, sorry if repeating. The medium makes a big difference. In the days of literally "cutting" the record, the mastering engineer had to make sure the bass wouldn't cause the needle to jump out of the track. Second, tube based equipment could differ a lot between American studios and England. Digital has made it possible to squeeze all the life out, but even if not the sound of the mix can be affected, requiring EQing and or remixing. I used to do mastering in a small studio--very small--and it wasn't always easy to make the customer happy even if I thought it was great.

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