Harmony Central Forums
Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Head or combo? And why?

Collapse



X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Combo with an external speaker out, so you can beef up the sound if required.

    A combo is also much cheaper than a head and cabinet!

    Comment


    • #17
      Combo's always made the most sense to me. I like to keep things as simple as possible for my simple brain.
      Wanna See the Original 70s Fender Starcaster re-issued?
      Sign the Petition!! link below (takes less than a minute, and its FREE! just skip the donation page) Do it!

      http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/fender70sstarcaster/

      Thanks for all your support so far!
      Signature count = 713!!! (26/Sept/2011)

      Comment


      • #18
        Combos for portability and affordability.
        Originally Posted by caveman


        I'll bend over backwards to make things work but I'll be damned if I'll bend over forwards.



        Digital Me

        Comment


        • #19
          Ok, these people who are saying combos are easier are baffling me.

          I stwongly disagwee.

          Combo's are heavy, at least Mesa ones are. If it's gonna be a 112 or 212, it'll surely weigh more than a head or cab. This means you strain more and are more tired when you are all ready to play at a show. Two easy trips is better than one insane, ****************ty, ballbustingly heavy trip. They're also bulkier, and demand more thought when packing up. They're harder to aim where you want as well.

          A head is more portable in my eyes, far more versatile, tubes last longer and are easier to change out because you can reach them easier. I switched from a 212 combo to a 212 cab and a head. I couldn't be happier. My combo had a hard case (which is a must in my eyes, if you're gonna gig it), and I was able to carry it by myself, but it was really hard and usually I had someone get the other end and help me. Sucks having to wait for someone to be done with their **************** before they'll help you set up.

          Man, I can't recommend a head and cab setup strongly enough. Especially with Mesa, I mean you probably want some beefy gain, and it's so much easier to get that from a closed back cabinet than a 1/2 back combo. Also, those high gain/high volume situations rattle the hell out of your tubes. Heads are less prone to that as the tubes aren't in the same box with the speakers.

          If you get a combo, I can almost promise you that you'll wanna switch to a head/cab down the road. It's frickin spendy to go from a combo to a head. The money you'll make from the combo will only cover part of the head, or maybe the cab with a bit leftover. If you decide you don't like your head or cabinet, then you can sell it for a very similar price that you paid if you bought used (as they're in higher demand, and for a reason), and just get a different one.

          I mean, sure, combos work for some, the old Fenders and Voxs are perfect for some bands, especially one guitar, not very hard rock type bands... but me thinks if you're wanting a Mesa, you want gain, and powerful gain, go with a head. Please.
          Sometimes you follow your heart. Sometimes your heart cuts a fart. That's the cosmic shame.Charvel So Cals More Guitars Amp PedalsMy Band Site w/ Player

          Comment


          • #20
            Got a point, there, at least as far as Mesa goes. Every Mesa combo I've run across has been hella heavy.
            Originally Posted by caveman


            I'll bend over backwards to make things work but I'll be damned if I'll bend over forwards.



            Digital Me

            Comment


            • #21
              If you decide you don't like your head or cabinet, then you can sell it for a very similar price that you paid if you bought used (as they're in higher demand, and for a reason), and just get a different one.


              I agree with most everything you say except the bold part - that, I stwongly disagwee with.
              "No one ever goes to heaven deservingly
              and no one ever goes to hell unwillingly."
              -CS Lewis

              Comment


              • #22
                I guess it all depends on whether you have the requirement to mix and match - to have a range of different amps at your disposal. If so, the head/cab arrangement is obviously better, as you can transport three different heads for the same weight as a single combo, and you can mix and match with different cabs.

                However, for most small scale performers, the single combo that covers the ground you need is likely to be a bit more practical. There is something a little more beautiful about a combo too, somehow.
                My band:

                http://lightbulbmomentband.com/

                Follow me on twitter

                Comment


                • #23
                  I agree with most everything you say except the bold part - that, I stwongly disagwee with.


                  Ok, if we're speaking about nicer gear... tube amps and Celestion/Eminence or better equipped type cabs, I totally think people buy more cabs than combos. Maybe I'm wrong, I dunno.
                  Sometimes you follow your heart. Sometimes your heart cuts a fart. That's the cosmic shame.Charvel So Cals More Guitars Amp PedalsMy Band Site w/ Player

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Combo-small bar scene shows, head-outdoors or large auditoriums with multiple speaker boxes(all custom built).

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      If you're looking at the same amp in a head or combo version - I'd chose the head for its versatility. I also have two cabs that I'm very happy with, so that helps the decision. I also have combos, and they server their purpose well. In the future, however, if I get an amp, it'll most likely be a head not a combo. That way, you could use an amp switcher to switch heads using the same cab. Very useful.
                      Guitars: 3 Fender Strats, Fender Jazzmaster, Squier Bullet, 2 Gibson Les Pauls, Gibson ES-339, Gibson Les Paul Jr. Special, Epiphone Les Paul, Epiphone Dot, Epiphone SG, PRS SE Custom 24, Ibanez AS73, Hamer Duotone, Larrivee D-03R, Takamine EG5013S, 1951 Epiphone Devon, Ibanez SR305 (bass)Pedal Chain: BBE Green Screamer -> MXR Distortion III -> Boss CE-5 -> EH Stereo Pulsar -> Boss DD-20 -> BBE Boosta GrandeAmps: Vox AC4, AC15, AC30, Pathfinder 10, DA5SoundCloud

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Kind of a no brainer here. If you have both you use what fits the venue, and makes life easire to move.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I don't really buy gear like an amp online anymore. And at my local stores, heads just aren't really available. For example, I just got a Mesa Express 5:50 combo. They make a short and a medium head for the 5:25 and the 5:50, but no store nearby sells the heads. Besides, the head+cab is a LOT more expensive than the combo.

                          Though I do wish I had the head+cab. Easier to move. Better mix/match.

                          But as long as you can carry the combo in one trip with reasonable ease, there is a certain appeal to the simplicity of it. I'd never want a combo with more than 1 speaker. Extension cabs all the way for that.
                          Salsa....Selsa.....what?

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            If I'm forced to choose I'll get head. But I prefer to get both in combo.oke:
                            There can never be a perfect plan. What's perfect for one human bean ain't perfect for the next one. Cuz he's a lentil.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              combo and a 2x12 cab, all you need and if its small venue leave the cab at home!
                              Marshall Amps
                              Gibson guitars
                              Tonepros
                              Lava cable
                              Dunlop/MXR

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                It depends.

                                If you need the "stage presence" to sell your band's image and are young enough to schlep it around, go for a head/cab.

                                If you're not trying to "sell an image", don't drive a van or don't want to deal with a lot of weight, go with a combo (although tube combos aren't light either).
                                My band "The Executives" website : TheExecutivesMusic.com

                                Comment









                                Working...
                                X