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  • #91
    violin

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    • #92
      During my early years in school I was taken aside and told, "not everybody is meant to play music".



      For the past 15 years I've played music for a living. Go figure!
      “One who loves & understands nature will never be alone & will never be afraid.”
      -Rachel Carson-

      Comment


      • #93
        During my early years in school I was taken aside and told, "not everybody is meant to play music".



        For the past 15 years I've played music for a living. Go figure!
        “One who loves & understands nature will never be alone & will never be afraid.”
        -Rachel Carson-

        Comment


        • #94
          born '58, into a musicianless family in Corvallis, OR.



          age 7: started/dropped guitar (private lessons w/absolute ****************e instructor who taught strict Mel Bay), lasted 3 months. Scale Fael.

          Harmony Stella. Neck that only a fullgrown hand can love (which I do now, but not back then).



          3rd/4th grade: self-taught for a couple years...picked what I liked from Mel Bay books, canned the rest.

          Started listening to Sweet Baby James (album), Tea for the Tillerman, and The Dillards.

          Developed a combo-style of fingerpicking and ham-fisted chord-banging.



          5th/6thgrade: played the trombone on the gradeschool band...one of only two trombonists, there was not much competition nor

          were we taught very much technique... the coronets and sax sections (8-10 each) got all the attention.



          7th grade middle school: landed in a 100 piece band... 7 trombones. I was run out within 3 weeks by an instructor who did not realize the potential in my Dizzy Gillespie-like cheek technique. The musical vacuum was filled with the guitar.. my mother found a fullsize Harmony Sovereign, used. This continued my legacy of playing big, clunky necks with small hands.





          10th grade: family had moved to Roseburg ("Lumber Capitol of The World") in the mid-70's. Heavy influences were Kiss, Alice Cooper, Slade, ZZ Top, Capn BiffHeart and Zappa. Bought a massive Teisco 4 pickup guitar (quite possibly a baritone) and played a combo of classic pieces (eg Jesu, Joy of Man Desiring) and Kiss, Slade covers in a small garage band that went nowhere rxcept into the alley to get high. Faeled in my first "music to get laid" effort.



          BUT, I got to play for a year in the High School Jazz Lab band...having that huge neck/small hands thing going, I could sling out little jazz chords all up and down the neck with ease...absolute suckage at lead, tho. But played a ton of Woody Hite/Woody Herman stuff, plus covers of Chicago and a few other impressive pieces (for the time). Used my trusty Silvertone 1485 (4 x 6L6GC ftw, baby !!!). The keyboardist worked at the local music shop so he sported a B3 + Clavinet ... also would "borrow" any pedal he could walk out with, so I got into a Morley Wah (Giant Chrome version). I also bought a Mutron III, to complete the funkification.



          Sadly (and mercifully) I was replaced by a far better 11th grade guitarist who moved into town, bringing with him a '66 SG and a '59 LP Jr (dble-cut/suicide neck, dusty-red)...the guy was very adept at all the rock-blues cliches at age 15, and blew me right off the roster. His name was Robert Johnson... I do not keed. I had no chance. He later went on to become a very good Shakti-acoustic player, from what I hear...no idea wht happened to him after that.



          After graduating and going to college, I became an acoustic-only guy for decades...mostly due to apartment life, then having kids/family stuffz.



          It's only since about 1995 that I got back into the electric.

          The Teisco is long gone.

          The 1485 head (sans cheeseball chipboard shell) still exists.

          I think my nother threw away the Mutron, not knowing what it was...it had been in her garage for over a decade.
          Blind Doc Jones' Pickles....Cures What Ails Ya

          Comment


          • #95
            born '58, into a musicianless family in Corvallis, OR.



            age 7: started/dropped guitar (private lessons w/absolute ****************e instructor who taught strict Mel Bay), lasted 3 months. Scale Fael.

            Harmony Stella. Neck that only a fullgrown hand can love (which I do now, but not back then).



            3rd/4th grade: self-taught for a couple years...picked what I liked from Mel Bay books, canned the rest.

            Started listening to Sweet Baby James (album), Tea for the Tillerman, and The Dillards.

            Developed a combo-style of fingerpicking and ham-fisted chord-banging.



            5th/6thgrade: played the trombone on the gradeschool band...one of only two trombonists, there was not much competition nor

            were we taught very much technique... the coronets and sax sections (8-10 each) got all the attention.



            7th grade middle school: landed in a 100 piece band... 7 trombones. I was run out within 3 weeks by an instructor who did not realize the potential in my Dizzy Gillespie-like cheek technique. The musical vacuum was filled with the guitar.. my mother found a fullsize Harmony Sovereign, used. This continued my legacy of playing big, clunky necks with small hands.





            10th grade: family had moved to Roseburg ("Lumber Capitol of The World") in the mid-70's. Heavy influences were Kiss, Alice Cooper, Slade, ZZ Top, Capn BiffHeart and Zappa. Bought a massive Teisco 4 pickup guitar (quite possibly a baritone) and played a combo of classic pieces (eg Jesu, Joy of Man Desiring) and Kiss, Slade covers in a small garage band that went nowhere rxcept into the alley to get high. Faeled in my first "music to get laid" effort.



            BUT, I got to play for a year in the High School Jazz Lab band...having that huge neck/small hands thing going, I could sling out little jazz chords all up and down the neck with ease...absolute suckage at lead, tho. But played a ton of Woody Hite/Woody Herman stuff, plus covers of Chicago and a few other impressive pieces (for the time). Used my trusty Silvertone 1485 (4 x 6L6GC ftw, baby !!!). The keyboardist worked at the local music shop so he sported a B3 + Clavinet ... also would "borrow" any pedal he could walk out with, so I got into a Morley Wah (Giant Chrome version). I also bought a Mutron III, to complete the funkification.



            Sadly (and mercifully) I was replaced by a far better 11th grade guitarist who moved into town, bringing with him a '66 SG and a '59 LP Jr (dble-cut/suicide neck, dusty-red)...the guy was very adept at all the rock-blues cliches at age 15, and blew me right off the roster. His name was Robert Johnson... I do not keed. I had no chance. He later went on to become a very good Shakti-acoustic player, from what I hear...no idea wht happened to him after that.



            After graduating and going to college, I became an acoustic-only guy for decades...mostly due to apartment life, then having kids/family stuffz.



            It's only since about 1995 that I got back into the electric.

            The Teisco is long gone.

            The 1485 head (sans cheeseball chipboard shell) still exists.

            I think my nother threw away the Mutron, not knowing what it was...it had been in her garage for over a decade.
            Blind Doc Jones' Pickles....Cures What Ails Ya

            Comment


            • #96
              I played recorder in 3rd or 4th grade (the whole class did) then the next year took up flute. I took flute lessons at school and privately and started writing songs when I was about 10. My band director laughed when I was writing scores during morning rehearsal and then was like...actually...that's not bad...



              Continued on this way playing classical/art music flute and also sang in church choir. Played in a lot of state ensembles as well. In high school I was in concert and marching band and eventually took up piccolo after our piccolo player graduated. I also started to learn bass when some guys from the band wanted to play rock. Eventually moved to acoustic guitar then electric. All this time i was also composing on daws (since about age 10). Took music theory in HS with the aim of being a music teacher but switched to English instead. Kept doing music privately/with others all through college and grad school.
              www.shoepedals.com

              Comment


              • #97
                I played recorder in 3rd or 4th grade (the whole class did) then the next year took up flute. I took flute lessons at school and privately and started writing songs when I was about 10. My band director laughed when I was writing scores during morning rehearsal and then was like...actually...that's not bad...



                Continued on this way playing classical/art music flute and also sang in church choir. Played in a lot of state ensembles as well. In high school I was in concert and marching band and eventually took up piccolo after our piccolo player graduated. I also started to learn bass when some guys from the band wanted to play rock. Eventually moved to acoustic guitar then electric. All this time i was also composing on daws (since about age 10). Took music theory in HS with the aim of being a music teacher but switched to English instead. Kept doing music privately/with others all through college and grad school.
                www.shoepedals.com

                Comment


                • #98
                  I did. My step mother was a semi-professional trumpet player in the 70's who played at home when I was still a kid in the 70's and 80's. I started on violin in the 4th grade and played a variety of other band instruments from the 5th grade to graduating high school. I started playing guitar around the 9th grade though and thats what I went to college for.
                  MarkWein.com and Forums
                  Study with me on Truefire.com!
                  McFeely Custom Guitars Artist

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    I did. My step mother was a semi-professional trumpet player in the 70's who played at home when I was still a kid in the 70's and 80's. I started on violin in the 4th grade and played a variety of other band instruments from the 5th grade to graduating high school. I started playing guitar around the 9th grade though and thats what I went to college for.
                    MarkWein.com and Forums
                    Study with me on Truefire.com!
                    McFeely Custom Guitars Artist

                    Comment


                    • oh yeah, I forgot to mention:



                      In the 5th and 6th grades, I was part of a 50+ voice Boys Chorus at Harding Elementary in Corvallis.

                      We were not 'hand picked' voices...it was all the boys of that age.

                      Our instructor was a lady by the name of Joyce Eilers, who later went on to some level of notoriety and success in the college-level chorale teaching, writing world. She taught us, a real ragtag group, to sing exacting 3 and 4 part harmonies that were decidedly NOT barbershop material (NOT everyone on a third).

                      Somehow, she convinced an educational record label to record/press a few hundred vinyl albums of us...one for each year in the 5 th and 6th grades.

                      I'm pretty sure my mother still has those. I gotta gett'em onto more modern media.
                      Blind Doc Jones' Pickles....Cures What Ails Ya

                      Comment


                      • oh yeah, I forgot to mention:



                        In the 5th and 6th grades, I was part of a 50+ voice Boys Chorus at Harding Elementary in Corvallis.

                        We were not 'hand picked' voices...it was all the boys of that age.

                        Our instructor was a lady by the name of Joyce Eilers, who later went on to some level of notoriety and success in the college-level chorale teaching, writing world. She taught us, a real ragtag group, to sing exacting 3 and 4 part harmonies that were decidedly NOT barbershop material (NOT everyone on a third).

                        Somehow, she convinced an educational record label to record/press a few hundred vinyl albums of us...one for each year in the 5 th and 6th grades.

                        I'm pretty sure my mother still has those. I gotta gett'em onto more modern media.
                        Blind Doc Jones' Pickles....Cures What Ails Ya

                        Comment


                        • I was a drummer in my 4th grade school band until I got kicked out, which was basically my Dad's fault.



                          I'm not sure how I wound up in band in the first place- for better or worse I've never been a "joiner", so I think my parents must have forced me into it. I'm pretty sure I chose drums because they were loud and involved hitting things. 4th grade band in our school was basically a way of weeding out the kids who (like me) didn't really want to be there, and our teacher was brutally efficient. Anyway, a few months into my tenure there was a combined 4th-6th grade Winter Concert. My folks said I couldn't quit until Christmas, so I was still kicking around. The 4th grade "drummers" lined up our practice pads on a table at the back of the band, and there was obviously no point in our hitting them at all since even we wouldn't be able to hear them over the cacophony. I was looking forward to the whole thing being over when something happened.



                          About a minute before the concert started, the 6th grade kid who was playing the bass drum dropped the mallet and ran away, I guess he had stage fright. I figured "what the hell", walked over and picked up the mallet, and promoted myself from the least important member of the percussion section to one of the key members of the entire band. The music teacher didn't realize what happened until we were into the first number, and I thought his head was going to explode when he saw me.



                          At this point, I have to explain what my father has to do with this. When I chose drums as my band instrument, Dad took me into the living room, spooled up his reel-to-reel deck, and played me Cream's "Wheels Of Fire." "This guy's name is Ginger Baker" he told me in a reverent tone as if he were introducing me to the Holy Trinity. I was too young to really understand what I was hearing, but I did realize that Ginger Baker guy could wail.



                          So, in my debut as bass drummer and timekeeper for my school band, I decided the best thing to do was to play like Ginger Baker. In my memory, I played dizzyingly dynamic, inventive polyrhythms under the staid, boring holiday classics the rest of the kids were droning out. In reality though, I was just a 10 year old beating the **************** out of a bass drum while 40 other kids tried like hell to maintain whatever vague semblance of time they had. I do know I hit that drum hard though, because I remember hearing the sound reverberating around the gym and loving it. I knew Ginger Baker would approve.



                          For my enthusiasm and sudden renewed interest in music, I was asked to leave the band. This was fine with me though, because even then I knew I had bigger fish to fry. In a couple years I would take up guitar, because I realized guitars could be WAY louder than drums.
                          Arrangements? How about I hit on two and four, and you shut the **************** up?

                          Comment


                          • I was a drummer in my 4th grade school band until I got kicked out, which was basically my Dad's fault.



                            I'm not sure how I wound up in band in the first place- for better or worse I've never been a "joiner", so I think my parents must have forced me into it. I'm pretty sure I chose drums because they were loud and involved hitting things. 4th grade band in our school was basically a way of weeding out the kids who (like me) didn't really want to be there, and our teacher was brutally efficient. Anyway, a few months into my tenure there was a combined 4th-6th grade Winter Concert. My folks said I couldn't quit until Christmas, so I was still kicking around. The 4th grade "drummers" lined up our practice pads on a table at the back of the band, and there was obviously no point in our hitting them at all since even we wouldn't be able to hear them over the cacophony. I was looking forward to the whole thing being over when something happened.



                            About a minute before the concert started, the 6th grade kid who was playing the bass drum dropped the mallet and ran away, I guess he had stage fright. I figured "what the hell", walked over and picked up the mallet, and promoted myself from the least important member of the percussion section to one of the key members of the entire band. The music teacher didn't realize what happened until we were into the first number, and I thought his head was going to explode when he saw me.



                            At this point, I have to explain what my father has to do with this. When I chose drums as my band instrument, Dad took me into the living room, spooled up his reel-to-reel deck, and played me Cream's "Wheels Of Fire." "This guy's name is Ginger Baker" he told me in a reverent tone as if he were introducing me to the Holy Trinity. I was too young to really understand what I was hearing, but I did realize that Ginger Baker guy could wail.



                            So, in my debut as bass drummer and timekeeper for my school band, I decided the best thing to do was to play like Ginger Baker. In my memory, I played dizzyingly dynamic, inventive polyrhythms under the staid, boring holiday classics the rest of the kids were droning out. In reality though, I was just a 10 year old beating the **************** out of a bass drum while 40 other kids tried like hell to maintain whatever vague semblance of time they had. I do know I hit that drum hard though, because I remember hearing the sound reverberating around the gym and loving it. I knew Ginger Baker would approve.



                            For my enthusiasm and sudden renewed interest in music, I was asked to leave the band. This was fine with me though, because even then I knew I had bigger fish to fry. In a couple years I would take up guitar, because I realized guitars could be WAY louder than drums.
                            Arrangements? How about I hit on two and four, and you shut the **************** up?

                            Comment


                            • i played sax when i was in 6-7 grade then dropped in when i got sent to a different school with no music program. back in public school, i started playing piano years later in the middle of my junior year. i immediately decided music was what i wanted to purue in life so i started taking private jazz lessons and in school both choir and an intro to music theory course. i did really well in the theory, so my senior year i did music theory AP and lucked out by having only one other student in my class (who was an all-state french horn player). we pushed each other so hard and tried to outdo each other that we were scoring 12-tone compositions for full orchestra by the end of the year as well as transcribing complex 4-part vocal harmonies. we did voice and ear-training every day, learned how to write for most instruments including percussion and even explored more esoteric compositional/instrumental styles like that of harry partch, steve reich, charles ives and more. i kept taking choir the same year as well as enrolling in jazz band. i wasn't that great of a player, but my drive outweighed my skill and i was able to keep up with everyone (it helped that it also wasn't that great of a band...).
                              smallsoundbigsound.com, brian@smallsoundbigsound.com
                              blog, FB, cymbals eat guitars

                              Comment


                              • i played sax when i was in 6-7 grade then dropped in when i got sent to a different school with no music program. back in public school, i started playing piano years later in the middle of my junior year. i immediately decided music was what i wanted to purue in life so i started taking private jazz lessons and in school both choir and an intro to music theory course. i did really well in the theory, so my senior year i did music theory AP and lucked out by having only one other student in my class (who was an all-state french horn player). we pushed each other so hard and tried to outdo each other that we were scoring 12-tone compositions for full orchestra by the end of the year as well as transcribing complex 4-part vocal harmonies. we did voice and ear-training every day, learned how to write for most instruments including percussion and even explored more esoteric compositional/instrumental styles like that of harry partch, steve reich, charles ives and more. i kept taking choir the same year as well as enrolling in jazz band. i wasn't that great of a player, but my drive outweighed my skill and i was able to keep up with everyone (it helped that it also wasn't that great of a band...).
                                smallsoundbigsound.com, brian@smallsoundbigsound.com
                                blog, FB, cymbals eat guitars

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