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Are you in tune with your aural environment?

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  • #16






    Quote Originally Posted by Folder
    View Post

    I'm apparently always listening to my aural environment.



    Sometimes I'll be in a restaurant or some other public place and I will make a comment about a song playing in the background and someone will inevitably say "What song ?" or "Oh yeah, I didn't notice it." - I can't help but notice it.



    I can't stand the sound of multiple audio sources playing simultaneously.



    I recently had lunch in a restaurant that had two TVs blaring on different stations. Also there was pop music playing over the sound system. I could hear spanish language music wafting out of the kitchen and then somebody had the nerve to put a dollar in the jukebox.



    As I sat there with the cacophony of five different sound sources blasting around the place I looked around to see if anybody else was as irritated as I was.



    Not a single person seemed to notice it.



    Do you think as a musician or audio engineer you hear differently than normal people?




    I watched Fox News for a brief time on election night. The screen was full of competing boxes, each with its own drama. Largest was Sarah Palin's talking head trying to make sense of the impending loss her side was seeing. Then, in smaller box was Greta (von Something) interviewing Palin, and another box showing "battleground states". All the while, there were two or three ribbons of information crawling across the bottom of the screen giving results of House and Senate races. All this, over a background of the U.S. map decked out in its red and blue states. It was visual cacophony that reminded me of stepping into a casino, with all the lights and video screens of the machines, each making irritating noises. I just don't like that kind of environment, but clearly, there are those who do.
    ....................

    "Here's something to think about: How come you never see a headline like, 'Psychic wins lottery'."

    ...Jay Leno

    Comment


    • #17






      Quote Originally Posted by Folder
      View Post

      I'm apparently always listening to my aural environment.



      Sometimes I'll be in a restaurant or some other public place and I will make a comment about a song playing in the background and someone will inevitably say "What song ?" or "Oh yeah, I didn't notice it." - I can't help but notice it.



      I can't stand the sound of multiple audio sources playing simultaneously.



      I recently had lunch in a restaurant that had two TVs blaring on different stations. Also there was pop music playing over the sound system. I could hear spanish language music wafting out of the kitchen and then somebody had the nerve to put a dollar in the jukebox.



      As I sat there with the cacophony of five different sound sources blasting around the place I looked around to see if anybody else was as irritated as I was.



      Not a single person seemed to notice it.



      Do you think as a musician or audio engineer you hear differently than normal people?




      I watched Fox News for a brief time on election night. The screen was full of competing boxes, each with its own drama. Largest was Sarah Palin's talking head trying to make sense of the impending loss her side was seeing. Then, in smaller box was Greta (von Something) interviewing Palin, and another box showing "battleground states". All the while, there were two or three ribbons of information crawling across the bottom of the screen giving results of House and Senate races. All this, over a background of the U.S. map decked out in its red and blue states. It was visual cacophony that reminded me of stepping into a casino, with all the lights and video screens of the machines, each making irritating noises. I just don't like that kind of environment, but clearly, there are those who do.
      ....................

      "Here's something to think about: How come you never see a headline like, 'Psychic wins lottery'."

      ...Jay Leno

      Comment


      • #18






        Quote Originally Posted by Jimbroni
        View Post

        Hear differently probably not, if anything maybe worse because our ears tend to be worn out.



        But Process different sure.. You obviously just pay attention. Most don't. I a lot of time go into another step, and find myself cataloging acoustic properties of rooms. How reverberate vs softy is it. Is there interesting resonances, etc. Check out the construction and what not.



        The cacophony you describe can be painful, but it can also be serendipidously amazing sometimes.. Its uncanny and I have no idea if I spelled that correctly




        "...find myself cataloging acoustic properties of rooms..."



        The first day of my favorite ever class at Columbia, Architectural Acoustics with Malcolm Chisholm, he stated in his introduction, "You will never sit in a room again and hear things the way you have up to this point. From now on... you will begin seeing what you are hearing."



        He was right.
        Thomas Jefferson said... "The day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the Supreme Being as His father, in the womb of a virgin will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerva in the brain of Jupiter." hmmm...

        Comment


        • #19






          Quote Originally Posted by Jimbroni
          View Post

          Hear differently probably not, if anything maybe worse because our ears tend to be worn out.



          But Process different sure.. You obviously just pay attention. Most don't. I a lot of time go into another step, and find myself cataloging acoustic properties of rooms. How reverberate vs softy is it. Is there interesting resonances, etc. Check out the construction and what not.



          The cacophony you describe can be painful, but it can also be serendipidously amazing sometimes.. Its uncanny and I have no idea if I spelled that correctly




          "...find myself cataloging acoustic properties of rooms..."



          The first day of my favorite ever class at Columbia, Architectural Acoustics with Malcolm Chisholm, he stated in his introduction, "You will never sit in a room again and hear things the way you have up to this point. From now on... you will begin seeing what you are hearing."



          He was right.
          Thomas Jefferson said... "The day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the Supreme Being as His father, in the womb of a virgin will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerva in the brain of Jupiter." hmmm...

          Comment


          • #20






            Quote Originally Posted by thankyou
            View Post

            I watched Fox News for a brief time on election night. The screen was full of competing boxes, each with its own drama. Largest was Sarah Palin's talking head trying to make sense of the impending loss her side was seeing. Then, in smaller box was Greta (von Something) interviewing Palin, and another box showing "battleground states". All the while, there were two or three ribbons of information crawling across the bottom of the screen giving results of House and Senate races. All this, over a background of the U.S. map decked out in its red and blue states. It was visual cacophony that reminded me of stepping into a casino, with all the lights and video screens of the machines, each making irritating noises. I just don't like that kind of environment, but clearly, there are those who do.




            No wonder Fox watchers were shocked by the outcome... most of them probably had no idea what was going on. [And I mean that in the very limited sense and context we're discussing here. Please don't read a broader message in there. ]





            I'm actually more bugged by a single TV going than a couple TVs and the ubiquitous kitchen radio blaring Norte


            music and social stuff | The Forgotify Files | A Year of Songs | mutant pop on facebook | roots acoustic on facebook


            The chorus seems a little weak... I think it needs more lasers.

            Comment


            • coyote-1
              coyote-1 commented
              Editing a comment
              I turn down sound usually, because it interferes with experiencing the here and now. And long ago I got past needing to analyze every piece of music I hear.

              The aural environment is FAR more than the man made sounds within it.

          • #21






            Quote Originally Posted by thankyou
            View Post

            I watched Fox News for a brief time on election night. The screen was full of competing boxes, each with its own drama. Largest was Sarah Palin's talking head trying to make sense of the impending loss her side was seeing. Then, in smaller box was Greta (von Something) interviewing Palin, and another box showing "battleground states". All the while, there were two or three ribbons of information crawling across the bottom of the screen giving results of House and Senate races. All this, over a background of the U.S. map decked out in its red and blue states. It was visual cacophony that reminded me of stepping into a casino, with all the lights and video screens of the machines, each making irritating noises. I just don't like that kind of environment, but clearly, there are those who do.




            No wonder Fox watchers were shocked by the outcome... most of them probably had no idea what was going on. [And I mean that in the very limited sense and context we're discussing here. Please don't read a broader message in there. ]





            I'm actually more bugged by a single TV going than a couple TVs and the ubiquitous kitchen radio blaring Norte


            music and social stuff | The Forgotify Files | A Year of Songs | mutant pop on facebook | roots acoustic on facebook


            The chorus seems a little weak... I think it needs more lasers.

            Comment


            • #22






              Quote Originally Posted by blue2blue
              View Post

              No wonder Fox watchers were shocked by the outcome... most of them probably had no idea what was going on. [And I mean that in the very limited sense and context we're discussing here. Please don't read a broader message in there. ]




              I find this "multi-media" feature of news channels to be annoying as well. Fox isn't the only one who does it too much sometimes. I suspect the idea is to try to make the TV screen looking more like you're surfing on your computer, what with scrolling text and side-bars and all. Since live talking-head shows can't be quick-edited to look like a music video the way other reality programming often is, I suppose they figure this is the next, best 'most exciting' visual look they can come up with?
              _________________________________________________
              band websites:
              http://www.JumpStartYourParty.com
              https://www.gigmasters.com/Rock/Jump-Start
              https://www.facebook.com/JumpStartYourParty
              http://www.weddingwire.com/biz/jumps...587fe5f12.html

              Comment


              • #23






                Quote Originally Posted by blue2blue
                View Post

                No wonder Fox watchers were shocked by the outcome... most of them probably had no idea what was going on. [And I mean that in the very limited sense and context we're discussing here. Please don't read a broader message in there. ]




                I find this "multi-media" feature of news channels to be annoying as well. Fox isn't the only one who does it too much sometimes. I suspect the idea is to try to make the TV screen looking more like you're surfing on your computer, what with scrolling text and side-bars and all. Since live talking-head shows can't be quick-edited to look like a music video the way other reality programming often is, I suppose they figure this is the next, best 'most exciting' visual look they can come up with?
                _________________________________________________
                band websites:
                http://www.JumpStartYourParty.com
                https://www.gigmasters.com/Rock/Jump-Start
                https://www.facebook.com/JumpStartYourParty
                http://www.weddingwire.com/biz/jumps...587fe5f12.html

                Comment


                • #24






                  Quote Originally Posted by Lee Knight
                  View Post

                  "...find myself cataloging acoustic properties of rooms..."



                  The first day of my favorite ever class at Columbia, Architectural Acoustics with Malcolm Chisholm, he stated in his introduction, "You will never sit in a room again and hear things the way you have up to this point. From now on... you will begin seeing what you are hearing."



                  He was right.




                  I first read about acoustic engineering when I was 12. My grandfather had been a very successful chemical engineer and there was a lot of 'hope' (not pressure, hope) that one of the grandkids would pick that thread back up, since my dad and his brother both went into business. For some reason acoustic engineer seemed a lot tonier than recording engineer. (For one thing, I knew the former was a real engineer with a college education.)



                  For a couple years I went around snapping my fingers, clicking my tongue, and clapping my hands whenever I'd enter an interesting space. (And later, I kept on noticing them, even when I was too cool to do the acoustics geek act.



                  In the 70s, after I started playing music myself, I would take my acoustic guitar and look for the coolest sounding places around campus and town to play.



                  My favorites were a particularly reverberant locker room in the art department (which just coincidentally had an endless supply of arty coeds coming through) and a very long underground tunnel that went from a park at the top of the coastal bluffs, under a busy four lane street, under a wide bluff-edge strip of grass (big enough to hold several simultaneous futbol games) and then out the side of the coastal cliffs, opening on a concrete landing and short stair down the rest of the way to the beach. The whole thing was something like 800 feet long with one stairway in the middle (exiting on the 'soccer' field side of the street)... it was all but forgotten, sometimes smelled decidedly dank, had a number of light bulbs out, the rare but sometimes very scary passerby -- but man, the sound went on FOREVER...


                  music and social stuff | The Forgotify Files | A Year of Songs | mutant pop on facebook | roots acoustic on facebook


                  The chorus seems a little weak... I think it needs more lasers.

                  Comment


                  • #25






                    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Knight
                    View Post

                    "...find myself cataloging acoustic properties of rooms..."



                    The first day of my favorite ever class at Columbia, Architectural Acoustics with Malcolm Chisholm, he stated in his introduction, "You will never sit in a room again and hear things the way you have up to this point. From now on... you will begin seeing what you are hearing."



                    He was right.




                    I first read about acoustic engineering when I was 12. My grandfather had been a very successful chemical engineer and there was a lot of 'hope' (not pressure, hope) that one of the grandkids would pick that thread back up, since my dad and his brother both went into business. For some reason acoustic engineer seemed a lot tonier than recording engineer. (For one thing, I knew the former was a real engineer with a college education.)



                    For a couple years I went around snapping my fingers, clicking my tongue, and clapping my hands whenever I'd enter an interesting space. (And later, I kept on noticing them, even when I was too cool to do the acoustics geek act.



                    In the 70s, after I started playing music myself, I would take my acoustic guitar and look for the coolest sounding places around campus and town to play.



                    My favorites were a particularly reverberant locker room in the art department (which just coincidentally had an endless supply of arty coeds coming through) and a very long underground tunnel that went from a park at the top of the coastal bluffs, under a busy four lane street, under a wide bluff-edge strip of grass (big enough to hold several simultaneous futbol games) and then out the side of the coastal cliffs, opening on a concrete landing and short stair down the rest of the way to the beach. The whole thing was something like 800 feet long with one stairway in the middle (exiting on the 'soccer' field side of the street)... it was all but forgotten, sometimes smelled decidedly dank, had a number of light bulbs out, the rare but sometimes very scary passerby -- but man, the sound went on FOREVER...


                    music and social stuff | The Forgotify Files | A Year of Songs | mutant pop on facebook | roots acoustic on facebook


                    The chorus seems a little weak... I think it needs more lasers.

                    Comment


                    • #26
                      Just as a point of interest, my father used to shoot rifles in his youth; now, at 72, his hearing is much the worse for it. He cannot evince, like most people can, "cocktail party listening": the ability, when in a crowded room of voices, to single out and listen to one particular speaker talking.



                      More on this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cocktail_party_effect
                      <div class="signaturecontainer"> <br />
                      <font color="blue"><b><font color="olive"><font color="sienna"><font color="purple">Every paint-stroke takes you farther and farther away from your initial concept. And you have to be thankful for that. </font> </font></font><font color="olive">Wayne Thiebaud</font></b></font><br />
                      <br />
                      <br />
                      <b><font color="#808000"><font color="blue"><a href="http://www.facebook.com/#!/rasputin1963/info" target="_blank">Friend me on FACEBOOK!</a> </font></font></b><br />
                      <font color="#808000"> <br />
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                      </font></div>

                      Comment


                      • #27
                        Just as a point of interest, my father used to shoot rifles in his youth; now, at 72, his hearing is much the worse for it. He cannot evince, like most people can, "cocktail party listening": the ability, when in a crowded room of voices, to single out and listen to one particular speaker talking.



                        More on this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cocktail_party_effect
                        <div class="signaturecontainer"> <br />
                        <font color="blue"><b><font color="olive"><font color="sienna"><font color="purple">Every paint-stroke takes you farther and farther away from your initial concept. And you have to be thankful for that. </font> </font></font><font color="olive">Wayne Thiebaud</font></b></font><br />
                        <br />
                        <br />
                        <b><font color="#808000"><font color="blue"><a href="http://www.facebook.com/#!/rasputin1963/info" target="_blank">Friend me on FACEBOOK!</a> </font></font></b><br />
                        <font color="#808000"> <br />
                        <br />
                        </font></div>

                        Comment


                        • #28






                          Quote Originally Posted by rasputin1963
                          View Post

                          Just as a point of interest, my father used to shoot rifles in his youth; now, at 72, his hearing is much the worse for it. He cannot evince, like most people can, "cocktail party listening": the ability, when in a crowded room of voices, to single out and listen to one particular speaker talking.



                          More on this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cocktail_party_effect




                          The great thing about learning to shoot on a proper firing range (the last thing I can thank the old NRA for) was learning the importance of ear protection. Those big ol' David Clarks go a long way to protecting your ears. I really wanted to buy a pair of their headphones back in the day. I figured they'd shut out the world but good. But they were really expensive.



                          FWIW, at 61, I can have some issues peeling apart conversations in a crowded, noisy place, particularly one with hard walls, floors, and or ceilings. (Tile floors -- they look great but they do screw with my auditory comprehension.) But then, while I didn't do all that much shooting without ear protection, I did ride a motorcycle for years -- and it really took its toll, as this was pre-helmet law, I preferred no helmet -- but when I did put on my helmet, it was, unfortunately, even louder than no helmet because of its poor airflow design. (Classic Bell.) Oh, yeah, and, then there was the fact that I would always make my way to the edge of the stage if at all possible. Oh, and the fact that, in those days when I was still trying to figure out the best way to deal with the crap drum kits I often had to record, I would sometimes stick my head right into the guy's kick shell looking for the sweet spot. (And there never was one. Go figger.)


                          music and social stuff | The Forgotify Files | A Year of Songs | mutant pop on facebook | roots acoustic on facebook


                          The chorus seems a little weak... I think it needs more lasers.

                          Comment


                          • #29






                            Quote Originally Posted by rasputin1963
                            View Post

                            Just as a point of interest, my father used to shoot rifles in his youth; now, at 72, his hearing is much the worse for it. He cannot evince, like most people can, "cocktail party listening": the ability, when in a crowded room of voices, to single out and listen to one particular speaker talking.



                            More on this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cocktail_party_effect




                            The great thing about learning to shoot on a proper firing range (the last thing I can thank the old NRA for) was learning the importance of ear protection. Those big ol' David Clarks go a long way to protecting your ears. I really wanted to buy a pair of their headphones back in the day. I figured they'd shut out the world but good. But they were really expensive.



                            FWIW, at 61, I can have some issues peeling apart conversations in a crowded, noisy place, particularly one with hard walls, floors, and or ceilings. (Tile floors -- they look great but they do screw with my auditory comprehension.) But then, while I didn't do all that much shooting without ear protection, I did ride a motorcycle for years -- and it really took its toll, as this was pre-helmet law, I preferred no helmet -- but when I did put on my helmet, it was, unfortunately, even louder than no helmet because of its poor airflow design. (Classic Bell.) Oh, yeah, and, then there was the fact that I would always make my way to the edge of the stage if at all possible. Oh, and the fact that, in those days when I was still trying to figure out the best way to deal with the crap drum kits I often had to record, I would sometimes stick my head right into the guy's kick shell looking for the sweet spot. (And there never was one. Go figger.)


                            music and social stuff | The Forgotify Files | A Year of Songs | mutant pop on facebook | roots acoustic on facebook


                            The chorus seems a little weak... I think it needs more lasers.

                            Comment


                            • #30






                              Quote Originally Posted by guido61
                              View Post

                              I find this "multi-media" feature of news channels to be annoying as well. Fox isn't the only one who does it too much sometimes.




                              Annoying...and stressful, at least to me. I can't stand it, and try as much as possible not to watch programs that do that. Two banners racing across the bottom of the screen, pictures-within-a-picture, a caption, etc. Not my thing at all.
                              Ken Lee on 500px / Ken's Photo Store / Ken Lee Photography Facebook Website / Blueberry Buddha Studios / Ajanta Palace Houseboat - Kashmir / Hotel Green View - Kashmir / Eleven Shadows website / Ken Lee Photography Blog / Akai 12-track tape transfers / MY NEW ALBUM! The Mercury Seven

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