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What is so special about the Korg N264/364?

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I was taking a look at a few used gear sites and see that the Korg N264/364 routinely go for $700-1000.

 

What is it about them?

 

I had one in the past and thought it was ok, but to me is was just a ROMpler. Not sad that I sold it (got a Virus Classic instead)..did I miss something about it?

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this was a very forgettable synth as far as Korg romplers is concerned. I don't see the attraction.

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Those synths are Da shitz for mexican "grupero" and "pasito duranguense" music :freak: Those guys love that synth.

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Metal and goth bands use them a lot for their typical string and choir sounds. AI2 synthesis is really popular in that genre.

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the n364 is pretty handsome.. but i'm going to say it's mostly the presets.. most of the modern romplers are mostly B&B prests along with dance and hip hop. but synths like the N series and d50, jd800 ect are mostly wanted for their genre defying presets along with their over all sound.

 

On the whole though, I dont think korg's underlying technology has changed much and they also tend to include all of their previous workstation's pcm samples, even if they don't make it into the presets. if someone was behooved enough, you could quite possibly program any sound from any of the older romplers that you wanted to on one of the newer ones. that's half the reason i bought my microx.

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The N264/364 have always been especially popular with our Latin users, and our dealers still report customers coming in looking for them to play bachata, cumbia, salsa, etc. From my experience, the big selling points for that market tend to be the bright horns, accordions, and piano sounds.

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On the whole though, I dont think korg's underlying technology has changed much and they also tend to include all of their previous workstation's pcm samples, even if they don't make it into the presets. if someone was behooved enough, you could quite possibly program any sound from any of the older romplers that you wanted to on one of the newer ones. that's half the reason i bought my microx.

 

Well... this isn't entirely true. The underlying technology DOES change quite a lot. Our interfaces maintain similar elements, e.g. Program and Combi modes, because we want Korg users to be as comfortable with our new stuff as they are with what they already have.

 

Generally, we retain only a small amount of the most appreciated sample content from previous workstations. Your microX (along with the TR and X50) is an exception, because it does have the entire 32mb classic Triton ROM, along with 32mb of newer data... but the M3, for example, does NOT contain that entire ROM.

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that was partly the sales pitch i got from the sam ash guy, which is what convinced me to buy to buy it. I guess i over generalized when i noticed similar waves on other synths :idk:

 

i hope you've been reading the requests for a MicroX based Electribe :cool: since it's been dropped, something like that would fill a big hole. as much as i love mine, i always felt it was an awkward piece that was better realized as an Electribe or sonic cell type device. but preferably Electribe :D

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I had one of those, and I think it is not a good keyboard. Ok, it has nice sounds compared with a Casio (I had one of those) but it doesnt have proffesional sound for itself. If you plan to use it with a band, using real instruments, the keyboard will sound decent and it is helpful to create atmospheres, but if you produce your own music using only a keyboard the lack of professional sounds, the lack of features (i.e the weak arppegiator), the lack of realistic sounds, maybe is going to be an issue. You can get good pads, and some sounds that can be useful, the string also are nice, and the choirs and bells (for doom metal, gothic metal or rock it can work very good due to the fack they use other real instruments like guitars, etc and it creates atmoshperes), but you cant produce an entire song with it without sound plastic. No talk if you want to create electronic music like trance, you cannot do that with a N364 wihtout sounding weak and plastic.

 

If I compare this to my Kurzweil, it sounds like a toy, no talk to compare if to a Access Virus regarding analog sounds. About Korg, the Triton series are way better in sounds IMO.

 

cheers.

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N364/264 is probably the only AI2 synth that I got my hands on, than actually could do separated Damper and Program Switch pedals! That's the difference :)

 

On X5D and N5(EX), for example, you have to choose between Damper and Prog Up action. Which is the only thing that bugs me on those machines.

 

Also, N364 has twice the user patch memory (2x100 prog/combi). The only thing that Korg messed up with N364 is not giving the users the ability to overwrite those 1700-some programs and combis with their own. THAT would be a very, very nice thing to have.

 

N364 has a floppy drive, which enables you to store your own programs in PRG banks, and then load them on the fly, in the middle of the gig or whatever (for example, during a drum solo :D), which makes it great if you change a lot of sounds during the show.

 

Here in Croatia, you can have N364 for around 500 bucks.

 

 

Also, it's a great tweaker's synth (not like a Kurzweil, though), I like to do my own patches. Here are some from X5D (all of these sounds can be done on N364, they have the same ROM):

 

http://www.box.net/shared/fcx3hpbo2m

 

Yeah, I know that the first lead sound comes in twice, I just love it, you can think of it as my signature lead :)

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but the M3, for example, does NOT contain that entire ROM.

 

I know. :( Every once in a while I find a patch I can't reproduce...

 

Hey Rich, I know you're not the guy to ask but Jerry's on vacation so you're next in line to harass... :)

 

What I think would be an awesome idea would be to release an EXB expansion pack for the M3 that contains waveform data from older stuff up to the current that is unique. For example, you could fit the entire DW-8000, DSS-1, M1's real piano, etc. in a single library. You know, a whole vintage thing. I would KILL for that. I mean it. Name your mark, I'm all over it. :)

 

:cop:

 

-Mc

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Well, X5D is more portable, yes. I also think the pitch bend wheel works better than a joystick, for me at least.

 

But I can't get over the patch changing with footswitch! It just isn't possible to have a damper and program up pedal at the same time on X5D! That alone is the reason I'd like to switch it with N364 one day.

 

Two reasons imo:

 

- the pinnacle of AI

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My experience with Korg N series was an N5ex. On paper , it's an upgraded model of early AI2 synths, with bigger wave rom. While in reality ,compared with X5d which sounded crystal clear, the N5ex sounds unbearably muddy. I think korg used cheaper effect section and DA chips on N5ex than on previous AI models.

I'm not sure if N264/364 sounded as bad, since these were earlier models of N series.

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Metal and goth bands use them a lot for their typical string and choir sounds. AI2 synthesis is really popular in that genre.

 

What does your last sentence mean? AI2 isn't a special form of synthesis. It's stored samples played through a filter. The sample set Korg used is pretty good IMHO but I have heard people say how powerful "AI2 synthesis" is yet what they are saying is "the Korg has nice samples and lots of options.

 

Except compared to my much-derided Alesis Fusion the sound creation options are unbelievably limited. The sample set it comes with just happens to be far far higher in quality as a percentage.

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The sound creation options are just enough for AI2 synthesis to cut through the mix (courtesy of sample resolution, FX section and the output stage), which is especially needed in said genres, so that's why it's so sought after even after all those years.

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Hi all. Don't often post, but thought I'd say a few words in defence of the N364. I've been gigging with it as my only board for 10 years (wedding/function band) and we do OK. Pianos, Rhodes, organ, strings all fine. Even a distorted guitar I use a lot. Brass a bit weak, but isn't it always? Never tweaked a sound in my life - just the presets (although I use a number of my own splits). And I'm convinced no keyboard will have a better blues harp (combi C56).

 

Got a Yamaha MO6 last year but didn't like it - accoustic pianos didn't cut through - so I sold it. Just about to pull the trigger on an M50-73 but a bit nervous - it'll take me weeks to get it set up to gig. And the effects are just too complicated - why can't you split two programs in a combi and have them sound identical to program mode? And where's the 10's hold button - the best live aid on a keyboard (I know we've got the touch screen but I just prefer real buttons for live work).

 

Anyway, I'm sure it'll sound great through my - wait for it - Roland KC550.

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Take a look on Ebay...here is one with 48 bids and it still has a little over a day:


http://cgi.ebay.com/KORG-N364-MUSIC-WORKSTATION-SYNTHESIZER-MIDI-KEYBOARD_W0QQitemZ350229894764QQcmdZViewItemQQptZKeyboards_MIDI?hash=item518b54166c&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14&_trkparms=65%3A12|66%3A2|39%3A1|72%3A1205|293%3A1|294%3A50


It is not mine...just used for illustration purposes.

 

It just sold for $770.00

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Hi all. Don't often post, but thought I'd say a few words in defence of the N364. I've been gigging with it as my only board for 10 years (wedding/function band) and we do OK. Pianos, Rhodes, organ, strings all fine. Even a distorted guitar I use a lot. Brass a bit weak, but isn't it always? Never tweaked a sound in my life - just the presets (although I use a number of my own splits). And I'm convinced no keyboard will have a better blues harp (combi C56).


Got a Yamaha MO6 last year but didn't like it - accoustic pianos didn't cut through - so I sold it. Just about to pull the trigger on an M50-73 but a bit nervous - it'll take me weeks to get it set up to gig. And the effects are just too complicated - why can't you split two programs in a combi and have them sound identical to program mode? And where's the 10's hold button - the best live aid on a keyboard (I know we've got the touch screen but I just prefer real buttons for live work).


Anyway, I'm sure it'll sound great through my - wait for it - Roland KC550.

 

First, sorry but KC550 isn't really a good thing for keyboard amplification ^^' Pianos sound especially dull through it. Roland... I'll pass. :rolleyes:

 

As for the effects section of M50, yes, you do need to tinker a little bit with it. It is way more flexible than on N364. Take a look at this example:

 

Program 1 is a piano, which uses (for example) an Exciter, an EQ, and a Hall Reverb

Program 2 is strings ensemble, which uses Crossover Chorus, and Hall Reverb

Program 3 is a choir, which uses an Enhancer, a Chorus, an EQ and Hall Reverb.

 

The usual suspect is Reverb. You need to put it in the Combi mode like this:

 

Piano goes through IFX1 which is Exciter, then through IFX2 which is EQ

Strings go through IFX3 which is a Crossover Chorus

Choir goes through IFX3, the chorus, and through IFX 4 which is Enhancer, then IFX 5 which is EQ.

 

You then route all of this to MFX1, which is your Hall Reverb, to put them in the same "room". MFX 2 could be a master EQ, and TFX is usually a Compressor/Limiter.

 

So, it's a bit more tweaky, but it's doable, and most of sounds in the combi can preserve their sound, if tweaked right. You don't need 3 different reverbs and 2 different delays or whatever in one combi, in most cases. Just route it cleverly.

 

About the 10's button - here's a suggestion. Order your Combis by the order you play them through the songs, then just use a footswitch to change the sound. It's the best thing in the universe after sliced bread!

 

:wave:

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