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  • #16
    Originally posted by Grant Harding View Post
    Put a piece of cardboard under that!

    Looks like a very cool guitar.

    Yeah I was careful with the heavy pickup not to lay it on the body but not as careful with the pots.
    I've got a boatload of guitars, but this one is definitely the sweetest of them all.



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    • #17
      Originally posted by Grant Harding View Post
      I'd ask around for the best repair person near you and get it perfectly rewired. For a great guitar like that the cost is justified and it's likely to sound better.
      Thanks. I was thinking the same.
      I've done re-wiring and soldering stuff in the past, but I'm certainly not a pro at it!
      You are right, for a guitar like this I'd rather have it done perfectly.

      BTW, what's your take on that cap?
      I don't know what they used exactly back then.

      StewMac has an assortment.
      The closest looking one they have is an Emerson I think, paper-in-oil.
      Period-correct specs, warm tone. Genuine handmade tone caps, hand-picked by our friend Mitch Ingram at Emerson Custom Guitars and Electronics.

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      • #18
        I'm not an expert on caps. I was told years ago that the only thing that makes a difference with caps is how close they actually are to their target capacitance and how long they stay that way in a guitar environment.

        Would be interesting to know the value of the existing one and it's rating.

        If you do refurb the wiring make sure you keep the original wiring intact so you can put it back to stock if you want.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Grant Harding View Post
          I'm not an expert on caps. I was told years ago that the only thing that makes a difference with caps is how close they actually are to their target capacitance and how long they stay that way in a guitar environment.

          Would be interesting to know the value of the existing one and it's rating.

          If you do refurb the wiring make sure you keep the original wiring intact so you can put it back to stock if you want.

          Thanks Grant.
          That's a good idea to keep the original wiring should I go ahead with a refurb.
          Right now we've got holidays here and there isn't anyone good local to do the job that I know of, so I'll wait until next week to
          decide my next move.


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          • #20
            OK this is going to be a really tough one I fear.
            When I opened her up and unscrewed the screws from the tail-piece one of them came out really short,
            like two or three threads only. I quickly saw that the screw had broken and only its head came out,
            with the body of the screw remaining in the wood.

            Has anyone ever had to deal with a problem like this before?
            And we are not talking about an accessible hole here.
            It's a hole accessible only from the outside of the guitar and it's plugged with a broken screw that
            is flush with the outside.

            Any elegant ideas on how to get that broken part of the screw out?






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            • #21
              If it were me I'd try to drill it out, then the drill bit would skate off the screw and put a big scratch in the top. Then I'd curse and get someone like Freeman Keller to fix my crappy attempt.

              Might want to wait for some more advice.
              Last edited by Grant Harding; 05-21-2019, 01:00 AM.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Jazzer2020 View Post
                OK this is going to be a really tough one I fear.
                When I opened her up and unscrewed the screws from the tail-piece one of them came out really short,
                like two or three threads only. I quickly saw that the screw had broken and only its head came out,
                with the body of the screw remaining in the wood.

                Has anyone ever had to deal with a problem like this before?
                And we are not talking about an accessible hole here.
                It's a hole accessible only from the outside of the guitar and it's plugged with a broken screw that
                is flush with the outside.

                Any elegant ideas on how to get that broken part of the screw out?





                There are special tools for screw extractions. It really depends on how small the screw was.
                You have some which screw in around the screw like this.
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                Or this

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                You also have the type that bore into a screw.

                Click image for larger version

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                In most cases its not a pretty job even with the proper removal tool.
                I've done some on guitars where the screws were glued in and busted the heads off trying to get them out. I filed a notch for a flathead screwdriver, then heated the screw wit a soldering iron long enough to burn the wood and eventually get the screw to spin. It was neither fun nor pretty. I eventually plugged the hold and re-drilled a new hole for the proper screw. Most screw extractors do collateral damage if there is no screw above the surface. If there is you can typically use a good set of plyers to grip the end and rock the screw turning in each direction till it begins to spin. Again, heat can help here.

                Some of the metal used for screws for guitar hardware can be really bad. Some are too soft and strip the heads, Others which are harder can crack or bust a head off like yours did. Guitar woods can be very hard and unless the holes are pre drilled you can run into problems removing or installing them.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by WRGKMC View Post

                  There are special tools for screw extractions. It really depends on how small the screw was.

                  You also have the type that bore into a screw.

                  Click image for larger version

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                  In most cases its not a pretty job even with the proper removal tool.
                  You're right WRG it wasn't a pretty job!

                  I went to a couple of hardware stores and ended up buying the 'bore into screw' type.
                  It was a special 'mini' bore size tool set.
                  But even the smallest bore was still too big for the screw!

                  I ended up drilling a bunch of holes around the screw, and eventually after a lot of drilling
                  and filing I was finally able to get a pliers around the screw and unscrew it!

                  Next I used wood fill to fill up the hole. Then sanded the top of the fill and drilled a new hole for the new screw.
                  It worked!
                  But again it wasn't pretty.






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