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Revolver; Stereo or Mono: you decide

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  • Revolver; Stereo or Mono: you decide

    stereo

     

    mono

     


  • #2
    Mono. I love my Beatles Mono Box Set.
    —-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Hello, friend.

    Comment


    • goodhonk
      goodhonk commented
      Editing a comment

      Texas Noise Factory wrote:
      Mono. I love my Beatles Mono Box Set.

      i've got a mono rubber soul record, love it.   i like the seperation of stereo, but there is a raw feeling that comes with mono. really works on rubber soul. 

       

       


  • #3

    Mono is moar louder.

    I like the way the guitars sit in the mono mixes better.

    Although... "Tomorrow Never Knows" is a bit trippier listening on cans in stereo.

    Comment


    • #4

      I like Taxman better in mono, hands down. But I like She Said, She Said better in stereo.

      I get why the monauralists are all purist about that stuff, but sweeping genreralizations are too limiting for me. Some stuff just sounds better with some separation.

      Comment


      • macadood
        macadood commented
        Editing a comment

        yea, some of the **************** is a little too hard panned on some of the beatles stereo stuff. sucks especially when you got one broken headphone/speaker or are only listening to in one ear when at work or something.


      • Phil O'Keefe
        Phil O'Keefe commented
        Editing a comment

        Fender&EHX4ever wrote:

        I like Taxman better in mono, hands down. But I like She Said, She Said better in stereo.


        I get why the monauralists are all purist about that stuff, but sweeping genreralizations are too limiting for me. Some stuff just sounds better with some separation.




         


        Good point about it being a song by song issue. I agree. I like both mixes / versions... I've spent more time with the stereo ones over the years (with the exception of some of the earliest albums), and Abbey Road was only issued in stereo, and that's one of my favorite Beatles albums (along with Revolver and Sgt Pepper), but I still enjoy the mono versions too.


        The mono mixes were the only ones that the Beatles showed up to give their input on - the stereo mixes of nearly all of the albums were done without them present. So if you want to hear the records the way the artists originally intended them to be heard, listen to the mono releases.


         


    • #5
      quadrophonic
      http://www.youtube.com/user/eti313 (umm, how do we make clickable links in sigs?)<br>Deals: Tron Murphy, hangwire, renula, AimmarCair, Urinate Forever, ck3<br>Kudos'd

      Comment


      • Phil O'Keefe
        Phil O'Keefe commented
        Editing a comment

        eti313 wrote:
        quadrophonic

         


        Why is it that every time they try to come out with a multichannel playback format, it fails?


         


        I think it might have something to do with complexity, and the fact that you can't hear quad (or surround) very well in a car.


         


         


    • #6
      It's really interesting to read up on how records were made back then and the limitations in the studio. I feel like we take a lot for granted these days as far as ease of recording and multitracking/overdubbing a bajillion parts.
      Test Tech Wattson Classic Electronics<br><br>EL KABONG wrote: I turned down $25 grand cash for gay sex.

      Comment


      • Urinate Forever
        Urinate Forever commented
        Editing a comment
        would have kudos'd echo but got denied

      • Phil O'Keefe
        Phil O'Keefe commented
        Editing a comment

        echodeluxe wrote:
        It's really interesting to read up on how records were made back then and the limitations in the studio. I feel like we take a lot for granted these days as far as ease of recording and multitracking/overdubbing a bajillion parts.

         


        Heck Chris, just in my lifetime (yeah, I'm old, but not all THAT old ) there has been amazing advances in terms of the capabilities of the gear that musicians could get for self-recording purposes. My first setup involved a small mixer and bouncing back and forth between two cassette decks. Shortly after that, I moved up to a machine with sound on sound capabilities, then a four track, then an eight track... 


         


        When the first Digi 001 came out (around twelve or thirteen years ago) and first brought "Pro Tools" to the masses, it was limited to only 24 tracks. And people soon complained... when only ten prior to that, they were all running narrow tape format 4, 8 and (if they were really lucky and willing to spend the bucks) 16 track analog recorders in their home and project studios. Between the two was the "ADAT era"; modular digital machines that had 8 tracks on S-VHS tape. While lots of people had one or two ADAT decks in the 90s, it was pretty rare to see someone running 3 or 4 of them unless they were pretty darned serious. I used to have four of them, but a lot of the time, you'd have one down - leaving you with only 24 tracks...


         


        While there are still issues to deal with, things are much easier, and a lot more capable today. Cheaper too. But you still have to learn how to use it, and how to get the best out of it. That's the part that doesn't have an easy path to instant gratification. Learning how to make good recordings, and how to be a good engineer still takes considerable dedication and work.


         


         


    • #7
      Mono. Bitch nuts.
      <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="1"><a href="http://acapella.harmony-central.com/showthread.php?2014628-Official-Effects-Good-Deal-Bad-Deal-Sticky!&amp;p=45289496&amp;viewfull=1#post45289496 " target="_blank"><b><font color="indigo">Smooth Deals</font></b></a></font><br />
      <font size="1"><font color="DarkOrchid"><a href="http://www.last.fm/user/adamthemute" target="_blank"><b>last.fm</b></a></font></font></div>

      Comment


      • riff ie
        riff ie commented
        Editing a comment

        Stereo if'n your into the whole wild west show gig, mono if your an old fashion gun slinger, fully auto seems to be the remedy as of late though...



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