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  • what is the deal with

    people who have a friend, relative, friend of a friend, or guy they went to high school with (or whatever)
    that is THE most badass singer, guitar player, writer, recording studio blah blah blah blah (or whatever) ?

    I get it. Good for you. I'd like to meet him (her), when are they playing? Lets go check them out...

    but they just keep ON and ON about them (and it's not necessarily alcohol induced).....
    It can't be just ME, surely you guys get this too.
    What the hell is the correct response :

    1) really? tell me more. (Ad infinitum)
    2) I need to hang out with you more so I can be more like your friend
    3) do you think they would hold the camera while you and I "do it"
    4) do you think he could sub for me? It pays $30
    5) buy me another beer
    6) I think I know him, he's on HC

    SELLING
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  • #2

    Hasn't happened to me in a while, but it sure is annoying.  Not as annoying as the guy who thinks HE'S the most badass whatever, and wants to get on stage with you to prove it.

    Jukejoint Handmedowns (my band)

    Find our album on iTunes!

    A Month of Songs (Songwriting blog)







    Originally Posted by gennation


    Neither of us is gay or anything, it just happened.

    Comment


    • WynnD
      WynnD commented
      Editing a comment

      Chicken Monkey wrote:

      Hasn't happened to me in a while, but it sure is annoying.  Not as annoying as the guy who thinks HE'S the most badass whatever, and wants to get on stage with you to prove it.


      That's one more reason to not allow sit-ins that didn't do a rehearsal. I don't like what happens to the show and the flow of the show. I don't care how good the player is, when they sit in there is usually a 2-7 minutes gap in the music while people talk about what song, what key....... Then you have the person who saw you do it, thinking it's their turn! If you can get them to a rehearsal, you can get all of the that out of the way. (I like gaps between songs to be less than 4 seconds. Helps keep the dance floor full.)

    • Kramerguy
      Kramerguy commented
      Editing a comment

      Chicken Monkey wrote:

      Hasn't happened to me in a while, but it sure is annoying.  Not as annoying as the guy who thinks HE'S the most badass whatever, and wants to get on stage with you to prove it.


      My experience with that guy is that he's usually full of ****, and when it does finally put his mad skills on display, it's embarassing and he then generates a zillion excuses, and then continues after that to exert how badass he his anyways.  Double fail.


  • #3
    I got it last night. The fellow started out complimenting the band and my voice in particular (rarely do I get that personal compliment). Without taking a breath - he moved on to talk about another popular band in the area that he grew up with and finally to his twin brother that has been tearing it up in Nashville.

    Nice fellow. Just a little drunk.

    He was wearing a tank top under shirt as his outerwear, jeans and American flag cowboy boots with the jeans tucked into the boots.
    nine8central
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/nine-...1913629?ref=hl

    Comment


    • #4

      Cool..Right on!! Yea Man...Alright!! Smile Those are my responses...then I continue playing.

      Comment


      • #5
        Yeah, it's all you can do. Most people think that because you're a musician, that music is the only topic of conversation you will want to have with them, so they try to think of a personal thing they think you'll be able to relate to. I can't hold it against them, but I'd most likely rather talk about lawn care and neighbors then the music pursuits of someone I don't know. It's fine though. Sometimes I will actually know who they're talking about and can share a couple stories of my own.
        Free prog-related metal from Michigan.

        http://www.silentlapse.com

        Comment


        • #6

          I can relate.  They go on and on forever.  I'm just thinking to myself "I'm not really much of a Richie Sambora fan", but usually just nod in agreement. 

          http://www.reverbnation.com/thedubiouscapture

          Comment


          • guido61
            guido61 commented
            Editing a comment

            One of my favorite lines in "Spinal Tap" is when they show up to play the gig at the military base and Fred Willard asks them: "Did you ever run into a musical group, works out of Kansas City, calls themselves Four Jacks and a Jill? They've been at a Ramada Inn there for about eighteen months. If you're ever in Kansas City and you want to hear some good music you might want to, uh, drop by."


        • #7

          ok good

          so it's not just ME they're drawn to.

          SELLING
          $40 Washburn Lyon wah
          $50 Korg EXP2 expression pedal
          $80 Ernie Ball VP Jr volume pedal
          $60 Electro Harmonix Octave Multiplexer
          $600 Rivera TBR1 2 channel preamp stereo power amp
          $150 Roland GP100 preamp/multi effects/ speaker emulator
          $140 Carvin DCM 150-150 watt stereo power amp

          www.jpaulmusic.com
          www.facebook.com/jpaulmusic

          Comment


          • #8
            I've always figured that this is part of the gig. i remember young guys in the late 70s early 80s that were in the military showing me their IDs to prove that they had long hair at one time. That was important to them. To show what they considered a cool guy in a band that they were cool too.

            I think it's important to talk to these people and make them feel at home. The point about musicians being comfortable and having a good time in this particular environment is a good one. People want to share that with you, the musician up on stage, as well.

            So while I've spent many a year and many an evening rolling my eyes and bearing with certain individuals, it comes with the job to a certain degree.

            But usually it comes from a good place. A lot of times it doesn't though. Those individuals that are basically ****************************s are a bit of a different situation. Those guys I tend to give the time of day up to a certain point then have learned to bail very quickly when need be.

            But it's all part of the gig, not being a servant to them, but being cool to your audience if it serves everyone involved in a sensible a cool way. But an ****************************? Why bother?
            __________
            Your god doesn't exist but my god does and he is all loving. If you disagree with me I'll kill you. - Prince Ea

            Comment


            • SpaceNorman
              SpaceNorman commented
              Editing a comment

              Lee Knight wrote:
              I've always figured that this is part of the gig. i remember young guys in the late 70s early 80s that were in the military showing me their IDs to prove that they had long hair at one time. That was important to them. To show what they considered a cool guy in a band that they were cool too.

              I think it's important to talk to these people and make them feel at home. The point about musicians being comfortable and having a good time in this particular environment is a good one. People want to share that with you, the musician up on stage, as well.

              So while I've spent many a year and many an evening rolling my eyes and bearing with certain individuals, it comes with the job to a certain degree.

              But usually it comes from a good place. A lot of times it doesn't though. Those individuals that are basically ****************************s are a bit of a different situation. Those guys I tend to give the time of day up to a certain point then have learned to bail very quickly when need be.

              But it's all part of the gig, not being a servant to them, but being cool to your audience if it serves everyone involved in a sensible a cool way. But an ****************************? Why bother?

              ^^^ This! ^^^

              I won't debate that most of the folks that come up to you at a gig and start telling you about the "awesome" musician they know, the "killer" band that they're friends with, etc. - are usually a bit of a pain.   However, the vast majority of them are a harmless pain.   Sure, when they corner you - you've got to look interested, you've got to come up with some sort of non-engaging response ...etc.   Next week they'll be standing in same place, trying to blow the same smoke up the ass of whatever band is there next week.   If you learn to handle 'em right, they'll be a fan for life ... and if you're lucky, YOU will be the "killer" band that they're talking about. 

              It doesn't cost me a dime to nod my head and respond with a non-descript "damn those guys sound like they're a helluva band!".   I can usually seal the deal by extending my hand, asking the guy his name, saying "my name is Patrick, thanks for coming out - it was great to meet you!"  ... then looking at my watch and say, "Damn, I gotta take a squirt and grab a drink before break it over ... thanks again from coming out, we're back next month - hope to see you then!" and then walking away.

              I do what I can to be "nice" to everybody - even when I know that they're completely full of **************** (as long as it's harmless).   Even the guys making fools of themselves with the America Idol audition vocals during our performance are harmless.  Sure, they can't sing and ain't adding a thing to our performance - they ain't hurting us either.   As long as they're not hurting my gig - I'm damn glad they're there.   Touch my gear, try to interfere with my gig by jumping up on stage, etc. - and I'm an instant prick.  


            • TIMKEYS
              TIMKEYS commented
              Editing a comment

              Lee Knight wrote:
              I've always figured that this is part of the gig. i remember young guys in the late 70s early 80s that were in the military showing me their IDs to prove that they had long hair at one time. That was important to them. To show what they considered a cool guy in a band that they were cool too.

              I think it's important to talk to these people and make them feel at home. The point about musicians being comfortable and having a good time in this particular environment is a good one. People want to share that with you, the musician up on stage, as well.

              So while I've spent many a year and many an evening rolling my eyes and bearing with certain individuals, it comes with the job to a certain degree.

              But usually it comes from a good place. A lot of times it doesn't though. Those individuals that are basically ****************************s are a bit of a different situation. Those guys I tend to give the time of day up to a certain point then have learned to bail very quickly when need be.

              But it's all part of the gig, not being a servant to them, but being cool to your audience if it serves everyone involved in a sensible a cool way. But an ****************************? Why bother?

              Well put.    The break is just part of the show. 


          • #9

            I've had a few of these experiences over the years. I'm usually fairly polite, smile a lot and say, "That's cool, man!" It's probably the wrong thing to do, because it seems to encourage more bragging.

            Potts' post reminded me of something that happened a few months ago. At the end of the night, a guy was complimenting the band and got onstage as we're tearing down the equipment and the house lights were up. He was telling us how great we were but that we needed someone like him to front the band. My cousin responded with something along the lines of "Yeah, we've got the lineup the way we want it right now, but thanks." After several minutes of him pulling an American Idol/The Voice acapella 'audition' while we're wrapping cords, we were starting to get pretty irritated. Nothing seemed to work for him to get the hint.

            Finally, when he said he'd love to "help out the band," I eagerly replied, "You can start by helping us move some equipment...you can disconnect those speaker cables from those speakers, then you'll know what it's like to be in the band." He was like, "Naw,man, that's okay" and I finally had enough, telling him, "Okay, thanks man, but we're busy here. It's been a long day, we're tired and we'd like to go home. Glad you liked the show, come and check us out again another time."

            Thankfully, I haven't seen him since...

            (This is my Non-Signature.)

            Comment


            • #10

              I just had one of this conversations this morning.  I get a phone call from a buddy who plays the drums.  By play the drums I mean he drinks a few beers and plays them once every other month or so.  He's realistic and honest about his ability... or I guess lack of ability.  It's not like he thinks he is Neil Peart and he is a nice guy.

              Anyways, he tells me he has a new neighbor who "shreds" and is a "pro".  He says "yeah... just moved here from Texas and toured with a ton of bands (can't remember who) and had a studio in his house... I told him about you.  We have to get together with him... hopefully I can keep a beat."  I have no idea how good the guy is or isn't, but if he is a pro he's not going to want to spend time playing with a drummer who can't keep time. If he's not a pro I will be miserable having to play with them.

              And now that I am typing this I realize the flip side of the equation.  On the flip side I am the guy my friend is telling him about who is "an awesome blues shred guy" or whatever.

              Lately when I have this type of conversations I just say "we should go to the jam at Pat's Pub on Monday.  I will be there.  We could probably play some songs together then."  So far no one has shown up.

              http://www.reverbnation.com/thedubiouscapture

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