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The 60s and early 70s

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  • electrow
    replied
    Originally posted by Notes_Norton View Post

    And I wonder if the drugs of the day had anything to do with it. LSD and Pot as opposed to Cocaine or Ecstasy or whatever the youth is into now?

    Insights and incites by Notes
    I think back then Music itself was the drug of choice for many - other drugs being incidental. Spending hours listening - the music it self was part of the conversation with those I knew. I remember being invited to a friend's place to hear Jimi Hendrix for the first time, on a high-end sound system - the record was played over and over.

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  • Notes_Norton
    replied
    I also think that musicians had more control over the product than the 'suits' in the office.

    We got things in the music that we musicians love, themes with variations of those themes, longer development of musical ideas, and a break with that 2.5 minute AM radio format.

    FM was just coming into it's own, and it took a while before the big corporate money dominated it. This gave the musicians with longer songs a place for them to be heard.

    And I wonder if the drugs of the day had anything to do with it. LSD and Pot as opposed to Cocaine or Ecstasy or whatever the youth is into now?

    I suppose there may be many factors, and these may have been contributors.

    Anyway, the Beach Boys broke ground with "Pet Sounds", which inspired the Beatles to do "Sgt. Pepper" and eventually top it with the "Abbey Road Medley", and hen before long everybody jumped on the album as art form instead of just a collection of disparate 3 minute tunes with the weak ones supporting the hits.

    Albums like "Dark Side Of The Moon", "Thick As A Brick", "Somewhere I've Never Traveled", "Days Of Future Passed", "Tommy", "Abbey Road", "Machine Head", "A Night At The Opera", "Close To The Edge", "Zep III or IV", Fragile, "In The Court Of The Crimson King", "Aqualung", "Royal Scam", "Aja" and so man others never happened before in the Rock genre and haven't happened in Rock or any of its descendants since.

    I was lucky to be of gigging age during all of that.

    Perhaps if music hadn't reverted back to overly commercial songs with a one month get-tired-of-and-need-to-get-something-new disposable format, the record companies wouldn't have gotten into the trouble they are in today. Why buy something that you will be tired of and dispose next month?

    Insights and incites by Notes

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  • UstadKhanAli
    replied
    Good point, that too. Synths were pretty big.

    Technology kicked the creativity along quite well. Also, advancements in multi-track recording, using the recording studio as a musical instrument, tape loops, musique concréte, and on and on.

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  • electrow
    replied
    And of course electronic technology was beginning to be incorporated into popular music which had never happened before. Hearing a Moog for the first time "truly" was amazing. It was such a diverse musical period which expanded my musical tastes in so many directions.
    Last edited by electrow; 08-13-2016, 12:28 PM.

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  • UstadKhanAli
    replied
    That's exactly what I'm getting at. The crossovers, mixing, and matching.

    And this sort of thing was occurring in various genres, including world/international music, jazz, experimental, West African, Asian, etc., incorporating many different elements from what was then typically outside their genre. It seemed to be a time for incorporating lots of things in.

    It was also a time in which artists began stretching the boundaries of what was "normal" in pop music, whether it was thematic, lyrical, or instrumental passages.

    By just about any measure, this seems to be the most creative period in music.

    I don't know so much about fine art and such that I feel comfortable commenting on it, but my guess is that, as this was a largely cultural shift, at least in the West, this explosion in creativity was reflected in fine art (painting, sculpture, etc.) as well.

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  • Pastor of Muppets
    replied
    Originally posted by electrow View Post
    I think the period will be remembered as truly the genesis of fusion. Cross over of probably every genre. Jazz-rock-classical-indian blended in ways never before heard in the main stream before, as just one example.
    Indeed. I think it's fair to say that the majority of the record-buying public (here in the UK, at least) hadn't come across the 'dulcet tones' of a sitar before hearing Norwegian Wood

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  • electrow
    replied
    I think the period will be remembered as truly the genesis of fusion. Cross over of probably every genre. Jazz-rock-classical-indian blended in ways never before heard in the main stream before, as just one example.
    Last edited by electrow; 08-13-2016, 10:52 AM.

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  • UstadKhanAli
    replied
    Creatively, this seemed to be a peak for a number of different musical genres, and also, not only in the West.

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  • gismo recording
    replied
    Absolutely the peak of rock music. 1965 to 1975 was the decade of the greatest rock ever made.

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  • Notes_Norton
    replied
    Add Yes, Moody Blues, Vanilla Fudge, King Crimson, Jethro Tull, Gino Vanelli, ELP, and quite a few others that I'll think of as soon as I click "post", and you get the most musically complex rock music of all time. Some of which borders on Classical music in structure.

    Personally, I think that was rock's peak.

    Not that there wasn't good stuff before and after, but it seems like it was the golden era of rock music from this musician's point of view.

    Bot everyone is entitled to their opinion and I'm sure others have their favorite era.

    Insights and incites by Notes

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