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Looking for help finding a bass amp for grindcore, powerviolence, crust and sludge

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  • Looking for help finding a bass amp for grindcore, powerviolence, crust and sludge

    Hey, Im looking for advice for finding a bass amp for grindcore and poweviolence and sludge and crust. I mainly want my bass tone to sound like spazz or dystopia. I know that the dude from spazz uses a cranked tube amp and I was curious if anyone knows what amp he uses? Also does anyone know what dystopias bassist uses?
    more: chung cư pcc1
    I'm also looking for suggestions for bass heads and cabs that may get similar but different tones. im looking for stuff that I can use to gig with and still be heard over the peavey Windsor 100 watt guitar amp.
    more: chung cư eco dream giá gốc
    Thank y'all so much

    I have a tiny ampeg practice amp so right now Im mainly just looking for stuff for live and band practice stuff. Thank you all again
    more: chung cư mỹ đình 2
    Last edited by adamjohnson; 11-23-2017, 01:12 AM.

  • #2
    Get a high-wattage Class D amp so you have lots of power, while keeping the weight and cost fairly low.

    Run the distortion pedal of doom of your choice into that amp. Problem solved.


    If you absolutely have to have a tube amp, an SVT or similar high-powered model would be my recommendation. They're not really known for their breakup / distortion - most bass amps are designed to be loud and clean and not to distort like a guitar amp. You could use a tube guitar amp and run it into a bass cabinet, but you won't really have any more power behind you than the guitarist will, and because guitar generally occupies a more easily audible part of the frequency spectrum, you won't be heard as well as them, even with the similar power levels.
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    • #3
      You didn't give a budget but the most Watts you can afford. You'll need them to keep up with a 100 Watt guitar amp with the actual Wattage depending on how loud the guitarist and drummer play.
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      • #4
        Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post
        Get a high-wattage Class D amp so you have lots of power, while keeping the weight and cost fairly low.

        Run the distortion pedal of doom of your choice into that amp. Problem solved.


        If you absolutely have to have a tube amp, an SVT or similar high-powered model would be my recommendation. They're not really known for their breakup / distortion - most bass amps are designed to be loud and clean and not to distort like a guitar amp. You could use a tube guitar amp and run it into a bass cabinet, but you won't really have any more power behind you than the guitarist will, and because guitar generally occupies a more easily audible part of the frequency spectrum, you won't be heard as well as them, even with the similar power levels.
        No budget?

        Chris Dodge used a Gallien Krueger-00rb in Spazz. Used they are dirt cheap, imo on the net.




        Now if you have a decent budget and what something that will shake the walls, Here a few options.

        Always a good choice at 80 lbs. Match it up with a 8X10 or a 4x10 cab.

        The Sunn 300T. Great amp, loud, and they also made a matching 4x10 and a 2 X15 cab. You have a difficult time deciding which one you like better so get em both.





        The only issue with these two set is, they don't distort out until your teeth are rattling a bit, so you want a bass distortion pedal.

        Look at the Darkglass Electronics Microtubes B3k Bass Overdrive, however there are others.

        Now if you want something more modern, there a few more option. I have an older Ashdown ABM 500 made in the UK. It has a grind knob on it and sub harmonizer. They still make it, but have upped the power to 600 watts. My Ashdown was not cheap back in the day, but I never looked back. They make a tube amp too.





        My last pick is this at 250 watts. They make a 450 watt tube amp too, but 250 might get the job done.




        Mesa and Ashdown make great cabs, and so does Ampeg and the Sunn.

        Match one up. Look around and hone out our tone.

        You can have the baddest a$$ grindcore band out there or which you did.

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        • #5
          I really don't think there's much of a correlation between gear and genre of music when it comes to bass. Bass is all low frequency and the instrument itself might have a bigger impact when it comes to tone and playability. The amp simply needs to be loud enough for the band and have a decent tonal range. Drive from a bass amp wouldn't be something you'd want. If the amp is under powered to where you'd be pushing it to distort, its unlikely the amp would last very long. Its usually better to go with something a bit over powered, then if you need drive just get it from a pedal.

          I personally like SVT but the weight make them too heavy to haul around at my age.

          Since you already have Ampeg I suggest you try out one of the Class D Portaflex heads.
          They make 3 power ranges. The 300W is OK for rehearsal and recording but isn't quite enough for club work.
          I'd go for the 500 or 800W versions instead. If you're playing heavy metal stuff and the guitarists use 4X12 cabs get the 800W. You want to run those Class D heads at lower power. Heat from pushing them too hard is their biggest enemy.

          A class D is much more likely to shut down or blow up when pushed to its limits so you need to figure out the wattage range you'll need then double it. The speakers are the other big item. If you stick with the matching cabs, I'd get both the 15" cab and a 2X10" The Head can mount in the 15" as a flip top. Makes it incredibly easy to move the amp. Then an extra 2X10" should be enough to match most guitarists rigs up to a 4X12. Beyond that you likely need something like a 4X10" or 2X15" to keep up with them.

          Personally I'd stay away from the 2X10" cabs unless the guitarists are using smaller 15W amps with small speakers. The 2X10's can be loud but they simply don't push enough air to keep up with a decent drum set's kick drum. You'll get lost in the backwash and start sounding too much like a guitar with 2X10's. 4X10's, 15's or a combinations of 10's and 15's always sound great live.

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          • DeepEnd
            DeepEnd commented
            Editing a comment
            The OP said he needs to keep up with a 100 Watt Peavey Windsor head (cab unknown but I'd guess probably a 4X12) so I don't get your comment about a 15 Watt guitar amp. Also, he mentioned in passing that he has an Ampeg practice amp but that's not a real reason to stick with Ampeg gear. It's good gear but so is a lot of other stuff.
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