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Daisy chaining a dual mono compressor

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  • Daisy chaining a dual mono compressor

    Like out from one side, into the next. Limiting on first stage, soft knee compression on the second. I’m asking first because this would be an ordeal the way I have everything set up..? This is a new concept for me.

  • #2
    Originally posted by redEL34 View Post
    Like out from one side, into the next. Limiting on first stage, soft knee compression on the second. I’m asking first because this would be an ordeal the way I have everything set up..? This is a new concept for me.
    Not quite certain what benefit if any would be had by applying soft knee compression after hard limiting. That approach to me sounds entirely counterintuitive.
    Originally posted by GTRMAN;n31424311

    The hijacking of the Republican party by the religious right really did send the party into a tailspin of fundamentalism and black/white politics. It's really scary how it transformed the party.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Prime8 View Post

      Not quite certain what benefit if any would be had by applying soft knee compression after hard limiting. That approach to me sounds entirely counterintuitive.
      Thanks, I trust your opinion. It was just flying all over GS.

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      • #4
        As a general rule-of-thumb approach, most professionals might apply some compression (i.e., something with a compression ratio set at something not even approaching the infinity or extreme setting of such control) to a track or tracks during mixing and in some cases even while tracking, especially if a vocalist might happen to exhibit an extremely wide dynamic range in their vocal approach, for instance. Of course this is a general application, not a one-size-fits-all.

        Hard limiting is more commonly viewed (though again, not always in every circumstance of course) as a step generally applied during finalization or even mastering in hopes of limiting all the peaks to a given threshold to provide enough overall headroom to raise the volume, hopefully while avoicing clipping. However, when used to excess, a well-trained ear can certainly observe the loss of dynamic range variations that inevitably will result.
        Originally posted by GTRMAN;n31424311

        The hijacking of the Republican party by the religious right really did send the party into a tailspin of fundamentalism and black/white politics. It's really scary how it transformed the party.

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        • #5
          Uh...What does a compressor do in this case? I really do not know.
          Sprinkles are for winners...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by redEL34 View Post
            Like out from one side, into the next. Limiting on first stage, soft knee compression on the second. I’m asking first because this would be an ordeal the way I have everything set up..? This is a new concept for me.
            Lots of engineers will use an 1176 and a LA2A together when tracking or mixing, with the 1176 (sometimes placed before, and sometimes after the LA2A) doing limiting and the LA2A doing compression.

            Stacking, or running two compressor / limiters in series is a very common technique. It also works with DAW plugins - in fact, I feel it helps to reduce some of the negative aspects of plugins, which tend to become more obvious the harder you push them and the more gain reduction you demand from them - with two in series, neither one has to work as hard, and IMHO, they'll often sound better that way than hitting a single compressor harder.
            **********

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            • #7
              Here... you might find this interesting...




              **********

              "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
              - George Carlin

              "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
              - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

              "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
              - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post

                Lots of engineers will use an 1176 and a LA2A together when tracking or mixing, with the 1176 (sometimes placed before, and sometimes after the LA2A) doing limiting and the LA2A doing compression.

                Stacking, or running two compressor / limiters in series is a very common technique. It also works with DAW plugins - in fact, I feel it helps to reduce some of the negative aspects of plugins, which tend to become more obvious the harder you push them and the more gain reduction you demand from them - with two in series, neither one has to work as hard, and IMHO, they'll often sound better that way than hitting a single compressor harder.
                Thank you! This is a new concept for me.

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                • #9
                  I'd go soft knee first, to tame the peaks somewhat before hitting the limiter. Seems to work. You can also stack multiple compressors to take a little bit off each time, but you need to be very careful with your dynamics or you'll wreck everything.

                  My preference lately is for opto style peak limiting, but that's just down to the material I've been getting sent tbh.
                  flip the phase

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by redEL34 View Post

                    Thank you! This is a new concept for me.
                    You’re welcome. Experiment with things a bit and get a feel for how it works, and if you have any questions, please let me know.


                    **********

                    "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
                    - George Carlin

                    "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
                    - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                    "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
                    - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Something I frequently do with a compressor, usually on vocals. I'll have the uncompressed track and a compressed track. Bring up the uncomp vocal to just below where it should sit in the mix, then bring up the comp track until it's sitting correctly in the mix.
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                      • #12
                        The RNC's "super nice" mode is multiple stereo compressors in series, I believe. Though I was not a big user of super nice mode, and generally do not compress while tracking.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by gismo recording View Post
                          Something I frequently do with a compressor, usually on vocals. I'll have the uncompressed track and a compressed track. Bring up the uncomp vocal to just below where it should sit in the mix, then bring up the comp track until it's sitting correctly in the mix.
                          You can do something similar (parallel compression) by using a pre-fader aux send to send signal from the vocal track to an aux return channel with the compressor inserted on it. Adjust the level of the two faders (and thus the ratio of the dry vs compressed signals) to taste.
                          **********

                          "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
                          - George Carlin

                          "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
                          - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                          "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
                          - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

                          Comment

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