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  • Anderton
    started a topic 75 Hours in Tokyo!

    75 Hours in Tokyo!

    Sometimes I really like my life

    Last week, over a dozen journalists made a trip to Japan that was put on by Korg, and I was lucky enough to be one of them. The object was two-fold: To give us a heads-up on what was going to be introduced at NAMM (as well as explain a little more about their 1-bit technology shown at AES), and to see Korg's headquarters and meet some of the people behind the products.

    It was quite the schedule. I got on a plane on the 10th at 7:30 AM, and arrived in Tokyo at about 4 PM on Monday the 11th -- just enough time to clear customs, get to the hotel (a 1.5 hour plus ride), have a nice dinner with Keyboard head honcho Ernie Rideout, go online for a bit, then go to sleep.

    Tuesday and Wednesday started at 8 o'clock with breakfast, a bus trip to Korg, then checking out products. I got to hang with some friends from mags in other countries, like Joerg Sunderkotter from Sound+Recording in Germany, and Gordon Reid from Sound on Sound. We'd head back to the hotel, then meet again at 7 PM for dinner, which usually got us back to the hotel at 10 PM. And yes, I LOVE Japanese food!

    Thursday I got a chance to check out the electronics stores and such, then it was back to the airport and time to come home.

    Unfortunately, I'm under NDA on the new stuff, but I certainly understand why Korg thought it justified bringing us all over. In particular, I'm chomping at the bit to check out the-main-thing-I-can't-talk-about as well as the other main-things-I-can't-talk-about. Korg was very low-key about all of this -- it didn't feel like a hypefest, more like a check-this-out, what-do-you-think? sorta deal. A lot of times these kind of press events are very high pressure, with an undercurrent of "write nice things about us or else," but it really seemed like Korg was mostly interested in treating us like a bit of a focus group.

    Anyway, I have plenty of other comments if people are interested...I don't want this to sound like "what I did on Winter break" but I do have a bunch of pix of Tokyo and of Korg, and if y'all are interested, just say the word and I'll post some more.

  • Anderton
    replied
    I checked it out, that's pretty cool! Thanks for the link and again, welcome.

    Leave a comment:


  • venkiee
    replied
    Well hello Singapore, and welcome to the forum! I'd love to see you start a thread about the music scene in Singapore if you get a chance


    There is already a forum in Singapore called www.soft.com.sg run by my friend and a old time musician....promotes a lot....of the local music talents...

    A bunch of guys are admirers of your articles in various magazines...I am delighted to be here....

    Leave a comment:


  • Anderton
    replied
    I am ENVIOUS of all the traveling that you get to do relative to your career. Although I suppose, at times, there are instances where required travel would not be so exciting...


    Actually, it's all exciting, and all an adventure to me...even those seminar tours I've done with nights spent at the local Red Roof Inn. I learn so much from being in other locations and communing with other people -- the more different, the better.

    One time I was at a restaurant in a country where not only did I not know the language, I couldn't even fake knowing it, and no one at the restaurant spoke English. I figured out there were headings on the menu, which I assumed corresponded to appetizers, entrees, etc....and figured that they wouldn't deliberately put something horrible on the menu, like fried sand So I just pointed at a couple random things to see what would show up.

    To this day I don't know what I was served, but it was pretty good!

    Leave a comment:


  • Anderton
    replied
    Well hello Singapore, and welcome to the forum! I'd love to see you start a thread about the music scene in Singapore if you get a chance

    Leave a comment:


  • venkiee
    replied
    Here's what I want to know: How come this has so many page views? Did someone link to this from somewhere?!?

    Anyway...more to come.


    Craig,

    I have read your reviews in many music magazines...but this thread link was posted on a Singapore Music forum and from that I become a member of this forum....

    Finding very useful information here....

    Leave a comment:


  • Anderton
    replied
    Here's what I want to know: How come this has so many page views? Did someone link to this from somewhere?!?

    Anyway...more to come.

    Leave a comment:


  • chipmcdonald
    replied
    Dude, if you want software get a computer, if you want a 'real' instrument, get a keyboard.



    But dude...!!!

    I stand by my remark. If the synth/keyboard manufacturers don't change how they do things, someone will change it for them and they'll be a generation behind.
    In fact, in a sense they already are - how many keyboard players use laptops already? They have a very small window of opportunity here to curtail the avalanche, but the angle of repose is pretty visible...

    Dude!

    Leave a comment:


  • Ani
    replied
    Craig,

    I am ENVIOUS of all the traveling that you get to do relative to your career. Although I suppose, at times, there are instances where required travel would not be so exciting; but... experiences like the one you have just shared helps to pave the way a bit for those not so enviable.

    I would really love to be able to tour the world and visit instrument manufacturing plants of all different types; from woodwinds, pianos, violins, brass, guitars, and all other types... to things as simple as moraccos. There is an art and science that goes into the making of quality instruments. As does the wood that goes into the making of a classical violin or guitar make all the difference in the world in sound quality; I'm sure the same holds true for the components assembled inside of electronic devices.

    Japan would be an awesome place to tour with their marketplace in electronics. I would like to see the brainstorming that goes into the mapping of circuitry for new designs; it would be even cooler to see those ideas implemented in real time.

    The photo of the open office environment reminds me much of the way my office was set up while detailed at the U.S. Treasury Dept when the USPS still had a physical station located at the U.S. Treasury Dept. The offices at the USPS are set up with cubicles in an open environment, but the walls are more at a standing shoulder height than a setting shoulder height. One thing is for sure, there is NO privacy unless you move to a conference room. Conference rooms require scheduling and advanced booking in most instances...

    Your anxiety in teasing us about new product releases reveals that you are excited about the upcoming series of instruments ready to hit the market; your excitement invites great anticipation for those that are waiting for you to unveil the "secret ammo" that you SO want to tell us about.

    I'm glad you had a great time in Japan...

    Leave a comment:


  • Anderton
    replied
    Real instruments, aka keyboards, have had computers in them since the 80s. But they're computers that don't have to run a general purpose OS, which is why you don't have to reboot them in the middle of a concert Or at least, rarely!

    Leave a comment:


  • midi
    replied
    Dude, if you want software get a computer, if you want a 'real' instrument, get a keyboard.

    Leave a comment:


  • chipmcdonald
    replied
    Originally posted by Anderton

    I think everyone knows that the AI synthesis engine is reaching its twilight. Suffice it to say that NAMM is only a few days away...keep your eyes on this space.


    I would think the future of hardware synthesis these days would almost have to be bound to a pc-on-a-chip architecture, simply because there's no other way to maintain a status quo in processing power while also having the flexibility to have a continuous develop process.

    The XBox should be looked at as a paradigm IMO; it's just a pc in a box with specific additional hardware attached to it. Combine that with Digidesign's proprietary hardware fascism, I'm surprise there isn't a keyboard/workstation equivalent.

    I would think a keyboard equivalent could be made for the same price point more or less, and you'd have the same ability to upgrade aspects of it using off the shelf technology, while at the same time being tied to the interface components ala XBox/Digidesign.

    I would hope if Korg is doing a major revamp of their synthesis tech, they'd also revamp how it's packaged and utilized. I'd guess they're going to do an XBox/Digi paradigm keyboard....?

    Leave a comment:


  • midi
    replied
    Oh, i get it, the new Radtron !

    Leave a comment:


  • Anderton
    replied
    First of all, thanks for the props I do like my job!

    Also, on the subject of audio engines, it's worth noting that the Radias has a very different engine from the Triton series...it's a helluva synth if you get a chance to play it.

    I wonder if Korg will use that engine in other things in the future...hmmm...

    Leave a comment:


  • cooterbrown
    replied
    Originally posted by Anderton
    <<Did you ask Mr. Katoh why Korg insists on continuously repackaging a ten-year old synth engine>>

    I think everyone knows that the AI synthesis engine is reaching its twilight. Suffice it to say that NAMM is only a few days away...keep your eyes on this space.


    Indeed... I really like Korg stuff, I was on the waiting list and got my Triton in what...January of 1998, I think?

    I worked for the largest home-grown music company in Alabama, and our Korg rep would tell us all about the great new product that was coming out...and it would always be another repackaged Triton (IMO, the only time he said that and actually delivered was with the ESX and EMX rhythm workstations...those were two kickass boxes).

    Just before I left retail, the Oasys was coming out, and while he dropped some hints about that, I said to him; "...what's next...a Triton the size of the Micro?", and of course, that actually came to be.

    BTW, Craig...I just wanted to give you some personal kudos.

    I have always been a gearhead since I was a kid (I graduated h.s. in 1985), and I always read your GP articles religiously, even though I have mostly been a keyboardist most of my life.

    Thank you for bringing hi-tech down a few notches to layman's terms...you made that side of music-making a lot more accessible and understandable, to me.

    Leave a comment:

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