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The difference between an amateur and a pro :-)

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  • The difference between an amateur and a pro :-)

    "When you go on a gig, you have to remember that it's a privilege to play any kind of music -- even sitting in your house by yourself. Music is this wonderful, universal language. It's meditative and spiritual. A lot of people get caught up in the frustrations, and they lose it, the way a preacher loses the calling. When you pick up an instrument, realize how blessed you are. It doesn't matter whether you're playing for 50,000 people or by yourself. I'm not saying I'm a guru of this stuff. It's just that when I pick up a bass, I'm conscious of how much it has given me, and I try to take that onstage with me wherever I go."

    - bassist Darryl Jones, who

  • #2
    "When you go on a gig, you have to remember that it's a privilege to play any kind of music -- even sitting in your house by yourself. Music is this wonderful, universal language. It's meditative and spiritual. A lot of people get caught up in the frustrations, and they lose it, the way a preacher loses the calling. When you pick up an instrument, realize how blessed you are. It doesn't matter whether you're playing for 50,000 people or by yourself. I'm not saying I'm a guru of this stuff. It's just that when I pick up a bass, I'm conscious of how much it has given me, and I try to take that onstage with me wherever I go."

    - bassist Darryl Jones, who

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    • #3
      I guess I use those words differently. You can have a pro attitude playing by yourself in your bedroom. You can have an amateur attitude playing on a festival stage to 1000 ...

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      • #4
        I guess I use those words differently. You can have a pro attitude playing by yourself in your bedroom. You can have an amateur attitude playing on a festival stage to 1000 ...


        Totally agree with that.

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        • #5
          There is something to the 'glad to be here' concept that sometimes go's way overboard, but it belies a good attitude toward what you are doing and it's certainly one way to say 'I like what I am doing, I respect what I am doing, I take this seriously, and thanks for giving me the venue to do my thing.'....
          http://sites.google.com/site/bizflyer/

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          • #6
            getting paid?
            Talking about music is like dancing about architecture. - Martin Mull

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            • #7
              getting paid?
              That's a sellout (just jokin' )

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              • #8
                For me, pro is an attitude for sure. It's having stuff in your gig bag that other people are always asking for because you've done it for so long that you know all the things that can break, go missing or fail. It's respecting the parameters that the venue hiring you establishes and not violating them. It's being able to adapt to less than optimal conditions- showing up and finding a small stage, or bad power, or finding out you've been booked into a room that you aren't right for- and finding a way to shine anyway. It's playing the songs rather than the instrument. It's wanting to see the guys you play with shine as much as you do. It's doing your best to meet requests, no matter what they are, either for specific dance songs, or to turn down, or to play Happy Birthday. It's being able to play as well for 2 people as you would for 2,000 and realizing that it's not their fault a crowd didn't show, and they chose to come and see you, spend their time and money on your performance, and deserve all you have as much as a big crowd does. It's being diligent to put out a good product- not being drunk or offensive or slovenly. It's being well rehearsed and polished. It's having respect for the craft and the trade. It's putting your rig in the car at night as you head home after the gig and knowing that you did the best you could do and didn't hold anything back from the job.

                Do I always succeed? hell no. But I do try.
                http://www.patcoast.com"The guy would be strumming along, singing the verse to “Margarittavile” and then he would hit his harmonizer pedal for the chorus. It went from sounding like a guy singing and playing guitar to sounding like the Stephen Hawkings trio."-Christhee68" the singer of my cover band used to find it funny to let out gaseous forms of vile hate and sadness that would make a plaster baby Jesus weep."- FitchFY

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                • #9
                  Yup. Play it like you mean it and be prepared. And tune that damn thing. LOL
                  Kickin' it in the sticks...

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                  • #10
                    For me, pro is an attitude for sure. It's having stuff in your gig bag that other people are always asking for because you've done it for so long that you know all the things that can break, go missing or fail. It's respecting the parameters that the venue hiring you establishes and not violating them. It's being able to adapt to less than optimal conditions- showing up and finding a small stage, or bad power, or finding out you've been booked into a room that you aren't right for- and finding a way to shine anyway. It's playing the songs rather than the instrument. It's wanting to see the guys you play with shine as much as you do. It's doing your best to meet requests, no matter what they are, either for specific dance songs, or to turn down, or to play Happy Birthday. It's being able to play as well for 2 people as you would for 2,000 and realizing that it's not their fault a crowd didn't show, and they chose to come and see you, spend their time and money on your performance, and deserve all you have as much as a big crowd does. It's being diligent to put out a good product- not being drunk or offensive or slovenly. It's being well rehearsed and polished. It's having respect for the craft and the trade. It's putting your rig in the car at night as you head home after the gig and knowing that you did the best you could do and didn't hold anything back from the job.

                    Do I always succeed? hell no. But I do try.


                    We should be in a band together.
                    Music, music, I hear music
                    Fitch Drums - The Blog for the Aspiring Non-Professional Drummer

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                    • #11
                      For me, pro is an attitude for sure. It's having stuff in your gig bag that other people are always asking for because you've done it for so long that you know all the things that can break, go missing or fail. It's respecting the parameters that the venue hiring you establishes and not violating them. It's being able to adapt to less than optimal conditions- showing up and finding a small stage, or bad power, or finding out you've been booked into a room that you aren't right for- and finding a way to shine anyway. It's playing the songs rather than the instrument. It's wanting to see the guys you play with shine as much as you do. It's doing your best to meet requests, no matter what they are, either for specific dance songs, or to turn down, or to play Happy Birthday. It's being able to play as well for 2 people as you would for 2,000 and realizing that it's not their fault a crowd didn't show, and they chose to come and see you, spend their time and money on your performance, and deserve all you have as much as a big crowd does. It's being diligent to put out a good product- not being drunk or offensive or slovenly. It's being well rehearsed and polished. It's having respect for the craft and the trade. It's putting your rig in the car at night as you head home after the gig and knowing that you did the best you could do and didn't hold anything back from the job.

                      Do I always succeed? hell no. But I do try.


                      My thoughts exactly.

                      I always look at playing as a gift, like Darryl Jones. I appreciate the fact that someone is hiring my services because they enjoy what I do. I am thankful that I can find bandmembers that not only are what *I* am looking for in a band, but they see me as someone worth spending time with as well. I know how fragile bands can be and I'm always grateful when it is going well, like it is right now. I also realize that not everyone can do all the things that I can do and I am glad that I have the ingredients necessary to provide people with a darn good band and getting paid to do so. Dealing with all the b.s. is worth it when it's working.

                      So many people I have played with just don't get it. They are incapable of being in a gigging band because they can't bend and adapt.
                      (This is my Non-Signature.)

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                      • #12
                        Being a pro is someone that sets the bar in the industry, and personally I tire of the false humility projected by so many in the public eye.
                        http://sites.google.com/site/bizflyer/

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                        • #13
                          "When you go on a gig, you have to remember that it's a privilege to play any kind of music -- even sitting in your house by yourself. Music is this wonderful, universal language. It's meditative and spiritual. A lot of people get caught up in the frustrations, and they lose it, the way a preacher loses the calling. When you pick up an instrument, realize how blessed you are. It doesn't matter whether you're playing for 50,000 people or by yourself. I'm not saying I'm a guru of this stuff. It's just that when I pick up a bass, I'm conscious of how much it has given me, and I try to take that onstage with me wherever I go."

                          - bassist Darryl Jones, who

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Appropriate tune for the post and concur about being humble with music.

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                            • #15
                              Lots a good responses here, but for me it always gets down to-

                              1) being prepared,
                              2) having your bandmates' backs, and
                              3) remembering this:

                              "A professional is someone who can do his best work when he DOESN'T feel like it."

                              And although I'm not the most talented guy around, I flatter myself that I fit that definition.
                              - Mike

                              CP4, PC3, Traynor K4

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