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  • OT- What's On The Menu Today?

    I grew up in a family where, when new year's day rolled around, you were gonna have cabbage or sauerkraut in one form or another. According to Dear Old Dad, it was eaten to ensure good luck for the coming year. Dad always said he was NOT supersticious. Not at all. He just didn't believe in taking any chances.



    Yesterday my wife informed me that today we're having Polish sausage (Kielbasa) and sauerkraut. Some people may turn up their nose at sauerkraut, but I love it!!



    And.......I've got some of the super hot horseradish mustard (the kind that comes in a tube......like toothpaste) for the Kielbasa. mmmmmm.....mmmmmmmm......good! That stuff'll take your breath away! Get it at Sam's Club.



    My "aperitif" will be a Yuengling......naturally. Not too cold and served in a tall beer schooner.



    HAPPY NEW YEAR......EVERYBODY!!
    <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="1"><br><br>Three Dreads......2 Martins and 1 Yamaha<br><br>A fiddle, a mando, a uke, eight harmonicas, a Zoom H2, a Panasonic recorder, coupla penny whistles, an Italian made Titano accordion, three handguns, at least a dozen chess sets, more power tools than Bob Vila, and one old Westclox &quot;Big Ben&quot; wind-up alarm clock that still works! Oh, BTW, I forgot to mention my ocarina and maracas.</font></div>

  • #2
    Happy New Years,

    We are having slow cooked Pork and Kraut so guess we are in the same "family"!

    Oh with a Michelob ULTRA Icy cold for me, Angry Orchard Apple Cobbler Cider for wife and girls will have soda or milk I imagine
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    • #3
      Down here on the right side of the Mason-Dixon line (), we'uns "in the know" ALWAYS eat black-eyed peas, greens and cornbread for good luck.



      A little historical context, courtesy of Wikipedia:



      The "good luck" traditions of eating black-eyed peas at Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year, are recorded in the Babylonian Talmud (compiled ~500 CE), Horayot 12A: "Abaye [d. 339 CE] said, now that you have established that good-luck symbols avail, you should make it a habit to see qara (bottle gourd), rubiya (black-eyed peas, Arabic lubiya), kartei (leeks), silka (either beets or spinach), and tamrei (dates) on your table on the New Year." However, the custom may have resulted from an early mistranslation of the Aramaic word rubiya (fenugreek).



      A parallel text in Kritot 5B states one should eat these symbols of good luck. The accepted custom (Shulhan Aruh Orah Hayim 583:1, 16th century, the standard code of Jewish law and practice) is to eat the symbols. This custom is followed by Sephardi and Israeli Jews to this day.



      In the United States, the first Sephardi Jews arrived in Georgia in the 1730s, and have lived there continuously since. The Jewish practice was apparently adopted by non-Jews around the time of the American Civil War (War of Northern Aggression).



      Another suggested beginning of the tradition dates back to the Civil War (War of Northern Aggression), when Union troops, especially in areas targeted by General William Tecumseh Sherman, typically stripped the countryside of all stored food, crops, and livestock, and destroyed whatever they could not carry away. At that time, Northerners considered "field peas" and field corn suitable only for animal fodder, and did not steal or destroy these humble foods.



      In the Southern United States, the peas are typically cooked with a pork product for flavoring (such as bacon, ham bones, fatback, or hog jowl), diced onion, and served with a hot chili sauce or a pepper-flavored vinegar.



      The traditional meal also includes collard, turnip, or mustard greens, and ham. The peas, since they swell when cooked, symbolize prosperity; the greens symbolize money; the pork, because pigs root forward when foraging, represents positive motion. Cornbread also often accompanies this meal.
      God(s) bless the rest of the world(s), too

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      • #4
        Here, it's pretty much any leftovers in the fridge, except those that didn't start out green, but are now...... yummy







        Paul

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        • #5
          Mom always fixed cabbage with a dime in it. Me, I'm gonna take my chances with chili and grilled cheese sandwiches.
          <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot; HAVE FUN, TRY NOT TO HURT ANYONE AND EAT PLENTY OF GREENS&quot;</div>

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          • #6






            Quote Originally Posted by poppytater
            View Post

            Mom always fixed cabbage with a dime in it. Me, I'm gonna take my chances with chili and grilled cheese sandwiches.




            What's the dime do?
            God(s) bless the rest of the world(s), too

            Comment


            • #7
              Black Eyed peas, venison, cornbread, and fixin`s.

              Comment


              • #8






                Quote Originally Posted by Terry Allan Hall
                View Post

                What's the dime do?




                Bring good luck
                <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot; HAVE FUN, TRY NOT TO HURT ANYONE AND EAT PLENTY OF GREENS&quot;</div>

                Comment


                • #9






                  Quote Originally Posted by poppytater
                  View Post

                  Bring good luck




                  OK, that was my guess...growing up, my Great-Aunt Shining Dawn always made a pot of beans w/ an iron horse-shoe in the pot, for flavor.
                  God(s) bless the rest of the world(s), too

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                  • #10
                    Leftovers! I have more lentil soup than I know what to do with here.
                    I should be practicing.

                    Comment


                    • #11






                      Quote Originally Posted by guitarist21
                      View Post

                      Leftovers! I have more lentil soup than I know what to do with here.




                      Well, you can bar-b-q most anything...
                      God(s) bless the rest of the world(s), too

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Chinese.



                        Egg rolls, dumplings, fried rice...and more...
                        <div class="signaturecontainer">Tom</div>

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                        • #13
                          Breakfast bagel this AM. Too many ski runs for lunch. Tonight it's chicken kabobs, rice and cucumber salad. Hippy New Year!

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                          • #14






                            Quote Originally Posted by Terry Allan Hall
                            View Post

                            Well, you can bar-b-q most anything...




                            I'll let you know how my barbecued lentil soup turns out!
                            I should be practicing.

                            Comment


                            • #15






                              Quote Originally Posted by guitarist21
                              View Post

                              I'll let you know how my barbecued lentil soup turns out!




                              Well, it can't taste any worse than regular lentil soup. My wife makes that stuff and then she actually eats it!
                              <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="1"><br><br>Three Dreads......2 Martins and 1 Yamaha<br><br>A fiddle, a mando, a uke, eight harmonicas, a Zoom H2, a Panasonic recorder, coupla penny whistles, an Italian made Titano accordion, three handguns, at least a dozen chess sets, more power tools than Bob Vila, and one old Westclox &quot;Big Ben&quot; wind-up alarm clock that still works! Oh, BTW, I forgot to mention my ocarina and maracas.</font></div>

                              Comment



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