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Canola oil on a rosewood fretboard?

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  • #31
    Okay, looking for some fretboard oil...
    I realize I have none.
    I do, however, have canola oil.
    I know this sounds like bacon grease all over again, but this stuff doesn't go rancid, ever.

    Should I do it?


    Oh God, no!
    Tom

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    • #32
      I leave mine well alone.
      2011 Guild D-125
      Gibsun J200 - Very appreciateive HCAG caper recepient. Thanks everyone!

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      • #33
        Not trying to be disrespectful, but did anyone else laugh out loud when they read Post #6?

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        • #34
          Not trying to be disrespectful, but did anyone else laugh out loud when they read Post #6?


          Yeah, but I didn't want to say anything about it.

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          • #35
            Not trying to be disrespectful, but did anyone else laugh out loud when they read Post #6?


            I must be tired, it sailed right on by me.
            1985 Guild D17
            2000 Guild D40

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            • #36
              Why do you feel that you must oil the fingerboard?

              Actually, I so far, never had.

              I just was cooking something and thought it was an interesting thought.


              Probably never will, as mentioned, sweat is a good oil.

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              • #37
                Actually, I so far, never had.

                I just was cooking something and thought it was an interesting thought.


                Probably never will, as mentioned, sweat is a good oil.


                Sweatin' while ya frettin'....that'll work.

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                • #38
                  Just as with string longevity, much depends upon an individuals body chemistry, degree of playing and can be influenced by how one stores instruments. Especially if crud build up tends to be an issue, as some shed more dead skin than others - as well as varying fingerboard quality. It's basically an either, or situation.

                  Natural body oils are great, but if your body chemistry falls into the alkaline or acidic camp (Body chemistry is seldom neutral) you'll tend to find some degree of deterioration or effect on the fingerboard and even frets in some instances - hence the oxydization and need for fret cleaning. This is where the use of mineral and some plant derived oils can help, as they can minimise such effects and float grime/body funk from exposed grain during cleanup, as body oils alone are seldom in sufficient quantity or clean enough to do so.
                  IF IT AINT BROKE, DON'T FIX IT.

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                  • #39
                    Fretboard conditioners (they're usually mineral oil based) are nice to have, I use them to help get rid of gunk build-up on the fretboard every few years. I think they definitely improve the feel of guitars with fretboards that are drying out (sometimes new guitars need the stuff after being blasted with air conditioning on the shelves too long). You hardly ever need to reapply, though; like I said, if you use it when cleaning, that's enough. The fretboard's condition probably wouldn't get any better if you used it every month than if you only used it every few years.

                    Edit: Actually, maybe more than every few years would be good. The post above me makes a good point about body pH and how acidity/alkalinity can damage and tarnish wood and frets. Just keep an eye on it. If there's gunk build-up, clean it off just to be on the safe side. And clean your frets now and then. They probably need it if you never have. Super fine 0000 (four-0) guage steel wool gives it a nice polish, then just oil up the fretboard and you're golden.
                    I would like to eventually be able to play 16 instruments like a medieval court jester.

                    Courtesy of trill:
                    The culture that surrounds our instrument is possibly the most materialistic, solipsistic, masturbatory, insular, and willfully ignorant one in all the arts.

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                    • #40
                      I know they recommend Canola for my popcorn machine since it has the highest burning point. Maybe that makes it a good choice for those chosen few whose fingers literally burn-up the fretboard.
                      ...


                      "I'll loan you my J200, but ya gotta promise to wipe it off, afterwards." - TAH

                      "Just remember, m'dear.....
                      There's a lot to be said for soft, squishy places on a woman" - Samilyn

                      Mark
                      =====================
                      74 Yamaha FG-200
                      79 Yamaha FG-750S
                      Epiphone PR 150 NA
                      87 Fender Stratocaster Plus
                      88 Hohner B2A headless
                      97 neck/08 body Frankentele
                      03 Ibanez AF75 archtop

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                      • #41
                        Ok, I gotta fess up. I use olive oil. But not on the fretboard. I just put the smallest amount on my fingertips, just a slight grazing after washing my hands. My (uncoated) strings last forever because of it.

                        I used to use Human Oil, but it seems my chemistry has changed over the years and my fingers just don't produce what they used to.
                        I.K.F.C.- O.T.A.- W.T.F.?.C.- E.S.C.
                        Member of the T. D. & H. faculty

                        CMWANLW

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                        • #42
                          i once put olive oil on the fretboard of a beater and it shined it up nice. never had an issue with smell, either. wouldn't risk it with a nice acoustic though, ha
                          2009 Takamine EAN-10C

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                          • #43
                            Use Naptha to get the Canola oil off followed by good fretboard oil. Such as the lemon and Fender stuff.
                            I use Dr. Duck's Axe Wax myself.
                            Only oil the fret board once or twice a year (not less than 6 month intervals)
                            2011 Mitchell MD100sce Acoustic
                            1979 Takamine F-349 (Martin Lawsuit
                            copy)
                            2011 Fender American Special Jazz Bass (Olympic white)
                            2008 SX SJM-62 electric with 3 P-90's

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                            • #44
                              pure canola oil doesnt go rancid. i put some on a small piece of wenge about 2 years ago as a test and its fine in that regard. the real issue would be that it never dries, so it will be sticky and attract dust and other things.
                              ---
                              1959 is dead
                              http://acapella.harmony-central.com/...4#post46436574
                              ---

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                              • #45
                                Really?

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