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  • Guitar Hero is dead. Good or Bad?

    Activision has pulled the plug on Guitar Hero - it's over. Sales tanked, so they killed it.

    Some folks (guitarists mostly) thought it was a joke and did more harm than good for music. Other folks pointed out that it increased music sales and paid royalties, and got kids interested in guitars, and therefore was a good thing.

    Are you happy or sad that Guitar Hero is now gone? And why?

    I'll go first. I'm happy. I'm happy when anything as "silly" as Guitar Hero goes away because it's annoying. I was happy when line dancing ("silly") went away, when the Macarena went away ("silly"), and now that adults will not "rock out" with plastic guitars any more, I for one am pleased. Now if only Karaoke would go away.

    And I use the word "silly" where in the past I would have used the word "gay", but I am now politically correct. Although I probably just messed that up by pointing it out.
    ---
    Richard MacLemale
    My Website at www.richardmac.com

  • #2
    Well, I have publicly stated often enough that the whole Rock Band/Guitar Hero thing was just a dumb game for people with no talent to pretend they were something they were not. What stunned me was the number of actual musicians who played it 'for fun'...hey, ok, you have time to do that great.
    Did it get kids interested in actually learning guitar? Maybe, for ten minutes...long enough to make poor mom and dad haul them over to best buy, $amA$h, GC and buy them a squier kit.
    What it really did was belittle the thing I love to do; cheapened it to where anybody could pretend to do what I spent decades learning to do...the musical equivalent of paint by numbers.
    Royalties got paid to legacy bands...great....it did not move the music business forward one iota.
    "We are currently experiencing some technical difficulties due to reality fluctuations. The elves are working tirelessly to patch the correct version of reality. Activities here have been temporarily disabled since the fundamentals of mathematics, physics and reason may be incomprehensible during this indeterminent period of instability. Normal service will be restored once we are certain as to what 'normal' is."

    Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally used up and worn out, shouting '...man, what a ride!'
    "The greatness of a man is not in how much wealth he acquires, but in his integrity and his ability to affect those around him positively" ~Bob Marley

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    • #3
      What stunned me was the number of actual musicians who played it 'for fun'...hey, ok, you have time to do that great.
      Gotta say, I've played Rock Band, and it was pretty fun. Admittedly, I'd never buy one myself, because I would probably get bored with it pretty quickly.

      As for the main thread question, I guess I am indifferent about the demise of Guitar Hero. Frankly, I really don't care what video games people play.

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      • #4
        Overall, I guess I'm glad it's gone. It was a fad and now it's over.

        I did enjoy teaching the kids that played the video game. They often wanted to learn the songs for real that they were doing on the game.

        However, I did notice that during Guitar Hero/Rock Band's peak in 2007-2008, that's when I had my highest number of students. It's been a downward spiral ever since and I can't deny the parallels between those games and the people who stuck with learning guitar.

        Ironically enough, I just got Guitar Hero: Warriors Of Rock for Christmas. I liked it because it had a lot of my favorite classic songs, plus it included Soundgarden's new greatest hits CD and finally, it had a sequence involving Rush's classic 2112 suite narrated by the bandmembers themselves.

        But do I play it all the time? Nah, I get more fun out of practicing the real thing.
        (This is my Non-Signature.)

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        • #5
          No skin in the game here. It tells me there's nothing like the real thing, but I knew that already.
          You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.

          (Hey, if you like the avatar, check out the art work of John Howe)

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          • #6
            I don't like it myself. Knowing how to play real guitar messed me up all the time. But I liked that everyone else was playing it. All these young kids were exposed to some of the best music from the 60s, 70s and 80s that they probably never would have gotten into otherwise.

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            • #7
              which bribngs up something I was curious about...I saw the game played several times, and the music was either GNR, or classic rock...but as this was aimed at kids (I assume it was) where there 'modern rock' tracks available? Like Kings of Leon, Gov't Mule, etc? or was it all older material?

              I am not opposed to video games in general, btw, but some things I have seen I find offensive, like GTA, for one...why would you design a totally anarchic game like that? To teach kids to be criminals, to have no respect for the law? I fail to see the sense in that.
              I personally prefer games that challenge my intellect, rather than how fast I can move my thumbs...
              "We are currently experiencing some technical difficulties due to reality fluctuations. The elves are working tirelessly to patch the correct version of reality. Activities here have been temporarily disabled since the fundamentals of mathematics, physics and reason may be incomprehensible during this indeterminent period of instability. Normal service will be restored once we are certain as to what 'normal' is."

              Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally used up and worn out, shouting '...man, what a ride!'
              "The greatness of a man is not in how much wealth he acquires, but in his integrity and his ability to affect those around him positively" ~Bob Marley

              Comment


              • #8
                But bloggers were telling me it would save the music bizzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
                If we crave some cosmic purpose, then let us find ourselves a worthy goal.
                -- Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot

                Comment


                • #9
                  which bribngs up something I was curious about...I saw the game played several times, and the music was either GNR, or classic rock...but as this was aimed at kids (I assume it was) where there 'modern rock' tracks available? Like Kings of Leon, Gov't Mule, etc? or was it all older material?

                  I am not opposed to video games in general, btw, but some things I have seen I find offensive, like GTA, for one...why would you design a totally anarchic game like that? To teach kids to be criminals, to have no respect for the law? I fail to see the sense in that.
                  I personally prefer games that challenge my intellect, rather than how fast I can move my thumbs...


                  I agree with you there, daddymack. I don't play many games, but I love playing Angry Birds. Which is a game you can pick up and play for 1 minute, or sit down and play for an hour. It doesn't require too much intelligence, but it does require you to estimate trajectory. Love that game.

                  Guitar Hero did have never tracks also, as well as older tracks, BTW.
                  ---
                  Richard MacLemale
                  My Website at www.richardmac.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The demise of Guitar Hero may be a sample of things to come. One way to look at the whole GH phenomenon is that it was a way for non-musicians to "dabble" in music, without actually creating or producing anything. Something similar could be said for DJs, karaoke, sampling, & even DIY recording, marketing & distribution. In each case, technology has empowered a class of users who previously did not have access to what had been "professional" capabilities. All were considered (at least by some) to spell doom for actual musicians.

                    I believe (or is it just desperate hope?) that at some point there will be a sort of consumer backlash against the mass quantities of mediocre (or worse) musical product flooding the market. Just because "anybody" can produce their own music for the world to listen to doesn't mean that they necessarily should. Guitar Hero has run its course. Other "enabling" technologies may very well do the same. I think (& hope) that someday music will regain its value, and no longer be a commodity. For that to happen, the music-consuming public will need to recognize that it's not all equal, and some is actually worth paying for in some way.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Today's consumer isn't content to be a passive bystander anymore. They are the 'look at me' generation, and want more interactive experiences. Hence, games like GH and Rockband, movies and TV shows where viewers determine what happens in the end (or even episode to episode in some cases), American idol, karaoke, iphones wih a gazillion apps, social networking, and so on. I never had an issues with GH except when bars were dropping live music and having GHG tournaments on the big screen TV. Thankfully, it didn't last long.
                      http://www.patcoast.com"The guy would be strumming along, singing the verse to “Margarittavile” and then he would hit his harmonizer pedal for the chorus. It went from sounding like a guy singing and playing guitar to sounding like the Stephen Hawkings trio."-Christhee68" the singer of my cover band used to find it funny to let out gaseous forms of vile hate and sadness that would make a plaster baby Jesus weep."- FitchFY

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                      • #12
                        It's just a video game.

                        How long was Pac-Man around?
                        Disclaimer: My threads and posts are created to allow forum members to discuss interesting subject matter.

                        I reserve the right to change my decisions at anytime.

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                        • #13
                          longer than Pong...but not as long as Asteroids...
                          "We are currently experiencing some technical difficulties due to reality fluctuations. The elves are working tirelessly to patch the correct version of reality. Activities here have been temporarily disabled since the fundamentals of mathematics, physics and reason may be incomprehensible during this indeterminent period of instability. Normal service will be restored once we are certain as to what 'normal' is."

                          Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally used up and worn out, shouting '...man, what a ride!'
                          "The greatness of a man is not in how much wealth he acquires, but in his integrity and his ability to affect those around him positively" ~Bob Marley

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Pac Man is still around. But you can get it for free on your iPhone. So Pac Man will be forced to... wait for it...

                            ...make money by touring.

                            Thank you, thank you. I'll be here all week. Be sure to tip your waitress.
                            ---
                            Richard MacLemale
                            My Website at www.richardmac.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Rock Band is fun, but Guitar Hero is endorsement prostitution.
                              Current Effects Chain: BBE UniVibe -> Zvex Fuzz Probe -> Subdecay Prometheus-> Moog FreqBox -> EHX Frequency Anaylzer -> Digitech Whammy -> MXR BlueBox -> Subdecay Noisebox -> Devi Ever Disaster Fuzz ->DE Bit-> Great Destroyer->DE Aenima-> MXR Phase 90 -> MXR Carbon Copy.
                              Guitar Amps: Orange Tiny Terror. Crate Blue Voodoo. Marshall G100R with an old Gibson 4x10.
                              Bass Amps: SWR Black Beauty 15' combo.
                              Synths: DSI Mopho, Roland Juno 106, Roland xp30, mircoKorg, Korg ms2000, Oberheim Matrix6R.

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