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Guitar player to become a bass player to be in a band (merged with bass gear thread)

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  • Guitar player to become a bass player to be in a band (merged with bass gear thread)

    What time I spent practicing an instrument. 95% of my time was playing guitar and maybe 5% playing bass if that. I can play lead guitar over blues changes pretty well and rythmn guitar. Chet Atkins Mr. Sandman, Chinatown my China town, Johnny B Goode so forth. I posted a earlier post about auditioning for a band for the first time. There is an opening for a bass player in a cover band. They have had a few gigs at bars. I used to work with the lead guitar player at a job six years ago and he calls me my friend. We are not close just an acquitance. The band needs a bass player. I have Ibanez bass and few instruction books. A big book of bass tab. I don't own a bass amplifier.. My first album I played all the bass parts. Do guitar players make decent bass players? How well does guitar playing skills transfer over to bass? Should I make an effort and learn their songs for an audition? Could I rent a bass amp from a music store for an audition? I am dying to be in a band. Will my inexperience hold me back? Is it worth going after? What do you look for a bass player when auditioning? Since I am friends with the lead guitar player could that give me an edge over the other musicians who try out?

  • #2
    Don't compromise - be a guitar player. Chicks dig the guitar player the most.
    Hamilton Steele CD's / Hamilton Steele MP3 Downloads / Hamilton Steele iTunes

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    • #3
      Don't compromise - be a guitar player. Chicks dig the guitar player the most.

      Nah, chicks dig the guy that owns the stage the most.
      Kickin' it in the sticks...

      Comment


      • #4
        Nah, chicks dig the guy that owns the stage the most.



        <div class="signaturecontainer"><b><font size="2">&quot;The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side.&quot;</font></b> - <i>Hunter S. Thompson</i><br />
        <br />
        Band promo shots on railroad tracks were cool in 1981...<img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/facepalm.gif" border="0" alt="" title="facepalm" class="inlineimg" /></div>

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        • #5
          Nah, chicks dig the guy that owns the stage the most.


          That would mean the bar owner gets laid...a lot! Sorry, had to!

          I would stick to guitar, if that's what you like you are not going to be happy with the bass.

          Rod
          www.tablefor2.net

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          • #6
            Just do it - no one here can predict what your outcome will be.
            Kickin' it in the sticks...

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            • #7
              What time I spent practicing an instrument. 95% of my time was playing guitar and maybe 5% playing bass if that. I can play lead guitar over blues changes pretty well and rythmn guitar. Chet Atkins Mr. Sandman, Chinatown my China town, Johnny B Goode so forth. I posted a earlier post about auditioning for a band for the first time. There is an opening for a bass player in a cover band. They have had a few gigs at bars. I used to work with the lead guitar player at a job six years ago and he calls me my friend. We are not close just an acquitance. The band needs a bass player. I have Ibanez bass and few instruction books. A big book of bass tab. I don't own a bass amplifier.. My first album I played all the bass parts. Do guitar players make decent bass players? How well does guitar playing skills transfer over to bass? Should I make an effort and learn their songs for an audition? Could I rent a bass amp from a music store for an audition? I am dying to be in a band. Will my inexperience hold me back? Is it worth going after? What do you look for a bass player when auditioning? Since I am friends with the lead guitar player could that give me an edge over the other musicians who try out?


              I started out on keyboards, messed around with a bass guitar for a while, then acoustic guitar, rhythm guitar and finally, lead guitar. I'm now a lead guitarist, simply because I did it for so many years and I concern myself with guitar equipment more than any other instrument. I did play bass guitar in a couple of bands about 4-5 years ago, but they were country-rock bands and while the gigs were interesting and I had some opportunities I might not have had, I wish I had just stayed on guitar and followed my own vision, leading my own band as a singer/lead guitarist like I am now. Well, I'm fronting the band, not leading it, but I will be doing so in the very near future.

              You can give it a try and you can always say, "Eh, not for me," after you're in the game. If you're itching to try out new experiences and think you can be fairly flexible, audition for it. You might enjoy it. A great bass player I know in one of the best bands in the area told me that he was an okay guitarist, but when he switched to bass, he became an *excellent* bass player. He doesn't regret the switch at all. Will that happen to you? Maybe. Maybe not.

              What I look for in a bass player is someone who is SOLID. Somebody that lays down a thick, tight groove with the drums so I can play a solo without hesitation or fear that the band will fall apart. In my current situation, the bass player's playing is shaky, so I have to hold it together like The Edge and Pete Townshend had to do in their respective bands. I'd rather just soar and relax.

              The "friend" thing might help, but what will really help is being very agreeable and willing to do things for the band. If that is not in your nature (to compromise, sometimes a LOT), I would pass and just play what you like on guitar.

              If anything, it will give you more opportunities being known as a guitarist and bassist. Bands are always looking for bass players and not always guitar players, so you will be more 'employable' as a bassist.
              (This is my Non-Signature.)

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              • #8
                I started out on keyboards, messed around with a bass guitar for a while, then acoustic guitar, rhythm guitar and finally, lead guitar. I'm now a lead guitarist, simply because I did it for so many years and I concern myself with guitar equipment more than any other instrument. I did play bass guitar in a couple of bands about 4-5 years ago, but they were country-rock bands and while the gigs were interesting and I had some opportunities I might not have had, I wish I had just stayed on guitar and followed my own vision, leading my own band as a singer/lead guitarist like I am now. Well, I'm fronting the band, not leading it, but I will be doing so in the very near future.

                You can give it a try and you can always say, "Eh, not for me," after you're in the game. If you're itching to try out new experiences and think you can be fairly flexible, audition for it. You might enjoy it. A great bass player I know in one of the best bands in the area told me that he was an okay guitarist, but when he switched to bass, he became an *excellent* bass player. He doesn't regret the switch at all. Will that happen to you? Maybe. Maybe not.

                What I look for in a bass player is someone who is SOLID. Somebody that lays down a thick, tight groove with the drums so I can play a solo without hesitation or fear that the band will fall apart. In my current situation, the bass player's playing is shaky, so I have to hold it together like The Edge and Pete Townshend had to do in their respective bands. I'd rather just soar and relax.

                The "friend" thing might help, but what will really help is being very agreeable and willing to do things for the band. If that is not in your nature (to compromise, sometimes a LOT), I would pass and just play what you like on guitar.

                If anything, it will give you more opportunities being known as a guitarist and bassist. Bands are always looking for bass players and not always guitar players, so you will be more 'employable' as a bassist.


                Yeah everyone knows that John Entwistle and Adam clayton are ****************ty bass players. Or maybe Pete townsend and the edge are not that good of lead guitar players.

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                • #9
                  Just do it - no one here can predict what your outcome will be.


                  This.

                  Mike Oldfield did it and look where his career went.

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                  • #10
                    I'm not going ever be the center of attention in a band I don't sing. They have a guitar player that sings and plays and he owns the stage. He is twice as big physcially as the rest of the band. You can't help notice him. A bass player goes unnoticed. Keeping the groove down and getting in synch with the drummer is most important. As far as getting that classic rock bass sound. Would you recommend a solid state or tube amplifier? Probably 250-300 watts. Would you want a pedal like samsung for bass? I would think you want a fuzzy tone as opposed to bass for classic rock.

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                    • #11
                      Yeah everyone knows that John Entwistle and Adam clayton are ****************ty bass players. Or maybe Pete townsend and the edge are not that good of lead guitar players.


                      Had a feeling my comments would be taken the wrong way.

                      I love The Who and U2 and I love all of the members in both bands. Entwistle was frickin' unreal on the bass guitar and Clayton came up with some interesting counter-melodies to what The Edge was doing. What I was getting at is that both bands had guitarists that were more rhythmic-based, so the rhythm section was more guitar-drums than bass-drums.

                      In Townshend's case, it was because Entwistle was playing slippery, fast lead runs all the time along with Keith Moon's manic drumming style, so Pete's slashing, angry, powerful rhythmic chords were what held the group together onstage. As for The Edge, because of his heavy use of delays with precise tempos and repeats, the bass and drums have to follow him rather than he follow them and can just play whatever. He has even said as much in interviews that the rhythm section in U2 is more like rhythm guitar-drums rather than bass guitar-drums.

                      Anyway, that's where I'm coming from with those comments.
                      (This is my Non-Signature.)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm not going ever be the center of attention in a band I don't sing. They have a guitar player that sings and plays and he owns the stage. He is twice as big physcially as the rest of the band. You can't help notice him. A bass player goes unnoticed. Keeping the groove down and getting in synch with the drummer is most important. As far as getting that classic rock bass sound. Would you recommend a solid state or tube amplifier? Probably 250-300 watts. Would you want a pedal like samsung for bass? I would think you want a fuzzy tone as opposed to bass for classic rock.


                        Solid state is cheaper and in some cases, more reliable, but a tube amp usually sounds better. For guitar, it's no question...tubes rule (unless you're playing really low, chunky music, then solid states have better definition). But with bass guitar, either way is fine. With a tube amp, you can get that fuzzy tone the harder you hit your strings (overdrive), which isn't something you can always do with a solid state amp. But you can simply buy a pedal that can add fuzz, distortion or overdrive and turn it off as needed. BOSS makes the Bass Overdrive pedal (BOSS ODB-3) for such applications.
                        (This is my Non-Signature.)

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                        • #13
                          I'm not going ever be the center of attention in a band I don't sing. They have a guitar player that sings and plays and he owns the stage. He is twice as big physcially as the rest of the band. You can't help notice him. A bass player goes unnoticed. Keeping the groove down and getting in synch with the drummer is most important. As far as getting that classic rock bass sound. Would you recommend a solid state or tube amplifier? Probably 250-300 watts. Would you want a pedal like samsung for bass? I would think you want a fuzzy tone as opposed to bass for classic rock.

                          I played guitar for years before switching over to bass.

                          Don't sweat the amp. The tone is in how you attack the strings, be it with a pick or fingerstyle. You'll probably get thin tone, and clack a lot, when you first start out. Work on developing a good, warm sound without an amp.

                          Take the time to watch pros, especially if you are planning on playing fingerstyle. The tendency for many beginners is to pull up on the strings when plucking. That's no good, and you'll get clacky, ****************ty tone. Watch Jaco and how he plucks the strings. Your fingers will push down slightly on the string before it comes up.

                          Resist the urge to "dial in" tone on your amp. Your amp should just amplify the natural tone of the bass, not compensate for unrefined plucking/picking technique.
                          Kickin' it in the sticks...

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                          • #14
                            I agree with Wades.
                            I have fun playing music....playing multiple instruments and willing to be flexible in musical style lets me perform more often.
                            <div class="signaturecontainer">&lt;&gt;&lt;<br />
                            <a href="http://www.crimsontruth.com" target="_blank">www.crimsontruth.com</a><br />
                            <a href="http://www.gotricities.com/thebuzz" target="_blank">www.gotricities.com/thebuzz</a><br />
                            <a href="http://www.christianmusicianforum.com" target="_blank">www.christianmusicianforum.com</a><br />
                            GEAR<br />
                            <font size="1">Carvin AE-185; Carvin Homemade solid body; BHG 33 year anniversary edition; Yamaha Pacifica 921; Peavey Cirrus 5 string bass; Carvin MTS 3200; Carvin G212 cab; Marshall Master Lead Combo; Hughes and Kettner Blu15 Ashdown MAG300 head; Ashdown 410 cab</font><br />
                            <b><font color="Red">SEEKING</font></b> <i>Fender &quot;the STRAT&quot; c. 1982<br />
                            preferably no mods; absolutely no mods to wiring </i></div>

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                            • #15
                              Fuzz on bass is overrated. Any decent bass amp is going to have a preamp stage. Use it to get small amounts of grind. Too much fuzz and you will disappear in the mix, quickly.

                              A good choice for enhancing the tone of your amp would be a Sansamp VT bass pedal. Many bassists love this pedal. Check out the reviews over on Talkbass.
                              Kickin' it in the sticks...

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