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  • #16
    I play guitar as a second instrument in my band. My guitar cost me $40 (an ibanez strat copy) and my playing is a wonderful contrast with our amazing guitarist. I start songs off that sound raw and out of control, then he starts playing and it takes off to another level.



    Plus, I'm all virtual instruments, so I play through amp sims. No, they're not as good as a real amp pushing volts through tubes and speakers, but I'm too old to carry big amps around.
    Todzilla
    HUGE sound generation & capture facility
    Eno River Basin

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    • #17
      Doubler here, well actually, more like quadrupler. Started learning guitar at 6, then moved onto piano/keys, then bass, and finally drums. I'm probably more proficient with a guitar than anything else, but my heart belongs to synths. Like others have said, I couldn't imagine limiting myself to just one instrument.
      A dead astronaut in space...

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      • #18
        I've played piano and keyboards for 48 years - I had many, many years of piano lessons. I have also studied composition and theory.



        I have always wanted to play guitar. One of my son's extra guitars is here, along with an amp.



        I've been thinking about picking it up to see what I could accomplish. Do you think it guitar lessons would facilitate my progress?
        -------------------------------
        Michael
        Jupiter-50, MOX6, TI Polar, Moog LP, Korg Micro X, JV-1080
        27" iMac, DP 7.24, Omnisphere, Alchemy, many more...
        http://www.youtube.com/keybdwizrd

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        • #19






          Quote Originally Posted by keybdwizrd
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          Do you think it guitar lessons would facilitate my progress?




          Yes.
          A dead astronaut in space...

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          • #20
            I hope I don't make this a life story post.



            My grandparents started me off with piano lessons when I was 4, but it was something I just couldn't get into. I always wanted to play the drums, so at age 8 they bought me my first drum kit. I was a natural, and drums have been my first musical love ever since. About 5 years later I got into playing guitar. It was a bit more difficult to pick up, but then again, 60's rock music wasn't that difficult to play either. It wasn't until the early 70's, when I first heard and studied up on synthesizers, that I got back into keys. Because I could make such unusual (back then) sounds, playing keys eventually became a close second to drumming.



            Skipping all my boring band stories of the past decades, I now just play and record for my own pleasure. However, I still take my music seriously, if only to enjoy what I've learned through the years (and I'm still learning).



            What works best for me now is to compile a group of songs that I want to record. That way, I can allot as much time as needed to each individual instrument without having to instantly switch from drums to guitar to keys to bass. I can spend days, or even weeks getting the drum tracks to my liking before moving on the next instrument. And the same with the rest.



            To me, being able to focus on one instrument at a time for as long as needed is important, since each instrument has it's own vibe, requiring a different state of mind to play as proficiently as possible.



            But that's just me.

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            • #21






              Quote Originally Posted by Buuzer
              View Post

              What works best for me now is to compile a group of songs that I want to record. That way, I can allot as much time as needed to each individual instrument without having to instantly switch from drums to guitar to keys to bass. I can spend days, or even weeks getting the drum tracks to my liking before moving on the next instrument. And the same with the rest.



              To me, being able to focus on one instrument at a time for as long as needed is important, since each instrument has it's own vibe, requiring a different state of mind to play as proficiently as possible.




              My experience also. When I'm focussed on piano, the guitar slips. When I'm focussed on guitar, the piano slips. This is fine for recording at home but makes me hesitant to play out on two instruments.
              All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

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              • #22






                Quote Originally Posted by keybdwizrd
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                Do you think it guitar lessons would facilitate my progress?




                To begin, I'd suggest taking the guitar out of its case and making sure it's at least as accessible as your keys. Lessons may be good, but you'll need a very bright teacher to adapt to your situation without wasting your time.
                All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

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                • #23
                  The guitar is still my main instrument I think, even though I've been trying to move to piano and keys for some 5 years now. I took some piano lessons early on but after my first son was born it became a bit hard to continue.



                  I often just pick up an unplugged electric guitar to noodle around in the evening after the kids have gone to bed and the house is quiet... so even though I do like keys and particularly piano best (and wanted to play piano since I was a small child), guitar still feels more at home.



                  And this is my main squeeze... a Franken-Tele... fantastic neck, fantastic sound.



                  http://www.reverbnation.com/christianschulze

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                  • #24
                    Christian,



                    What kind of strings do you put on that thing? (just curious)
                    A dead astronaut in space...

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                    • #25
                      I use a light-heavy set (.010-.052). From Webstrings, the cheap place to buy strings I have 7 electrics, 2 acoustics and 2 bass guitars, so I buy strings in bulk.



                      In fact, I just changed strings on that guitar last night and finally came around to repositioning the bridge pickup a little bit (it's screwed to the body so it's a bit harder to adjust...)
                      http://www.reverbnation.com/christianschulze

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                      • #26
                        i started playing bass, i still find that to be my most 'expressive' instrument. i don't pick it up as often as i should anymore, but i try to keep using it in my music and forcing myself to practice enough to create good parts quickly. i haven't played live with the bass in probably 2 or 3 years now, though i'm sure i could hold my own for the stuff that i do.



                        guitar is a different beast, i started playing that late high school. practiced a lot, got decent enough (played a lot of blues, surprisingly) and had good equipment. i haven't stayed nearly as current as i would like on that instrument. i've still got a plethora of guitar gear and nice guitars, but it's just a question of division of studio labor at this point. i really enjoy recording & mixing, sound design and looping more than i enjoy songwriting and coming up with progressions in a structured way. same goes for some other instruments as well that i played well at one time, brass (trombone + euphonium) , cello and double bass.





                        i guess the decision to become a multi-instrumentalist really depends on your free time & what you want to achieve with your skills. in a home recording environment, a lot can be accomplished with relatively little skill at an instrument - as long as you are familiar with basic editing & mixing. live work is certainly more unforgiving, as is just jamming with other human beings. an hour a day of practice + a weekly band rehearsal is not something that fits in my schedule anymore, and that's how i remember becoming skillful. it's a shame.



                        maybe i'm a packrat, but just because i can't devote the time to improving my skills on an instrument like i used to doesn't mean i don't keep them around. i like returning to the instruments of my youth, before i discovered all this electronic stuff - even if my callouses are gone and my fingers can't quite find the right notes. dabbling is enjoyable and allows me a wider range of natural timbres for the music i record. it's okay to dabble!
                        -jason

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                        • #27






                          Quote Originally Posted by ChristianRock
                          View Post

                          I use a light-heavy set (.010-.052). From Webstrings, the cheap place to buy strings I have 7 electrics, 2 acoustics and 2 bass guitars, so I buy strings in bulk.



                          In fact, I just changed strings on that guitar last night and finally came around to repositioning the bridge pickup a little bit (it's screwed to the body so it's a bit harder to adjust...)




                          Gotcha. I find that a LOT of "serious" guitar players usually have a brand or kind of string they prefer, if they aren't downright snobby about it!



                          Personally, I love some Ernie Ball strings for my electrics (and bass, actually), but I almost always use Martin strings on my acoustics.
                          A dead astronaut in space...

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                          • #28
                            Never limit yourself. Sure playing more than one instrument limits the practice time on each but, unless you are trying to be a virtuoso does this matter? No. I started on guitar at 9 and then bought a bass at 15. Picked up a couple synths in my late teens and can play the parts I hear for my electronic music. I also bought a set of electronic drums to have around. My daughter started playing these drums a couple years ago which has pushed me to be a better player so I can teach her. Thanx to You Tube and a few rudiment and snare DVDs I have learned a lot and can jam pretty good with friends when everyone else wants to play other instruments. Remember to never limit yourself and always keep kickin' your own ass to stay motivated.

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                            • #29






                              Quote Originally Posted by pogo97
                              View Post

                              To begin, I'd suggest taking the guitar out of its case and making sure it's at least as accessible as your keys.




                              Not sure what you mean by that. I'd be playing my son's "fat strat" - a guitar he left at home. There's also a 50w Marshall combo amp of some kind in my basement... It has a solid state channel and a tube channel for leads, as I recall. I have fiddled around with guitars before and generally know how they work. I can play a couple of chords.



                              Oh... and I think I can tune a guitar, given that I have a tuning app on my iPhone!
                              -------------------------------
                              Michael
                              Jupiter-50, MOX6, TI Polar, Moog LP, Korg Micro X, JV-1080
                              27" iMac, DP 7.24, Omnisphere, Alchemy, many more...
                              http://www.youtube.com/keybdwizrd

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                              • #30






                                Quote Originally Posted by keybdwizrd
                                View Post

                                Not sure what you mean by that!




                                I mean: set things up so that it takes very little effort to just pick it up and play. My piano sits in the parlour with the keyboard cover up so that I can sit down and play immediately. My acoustic guitar hangs on the wall nearby and my electric lives, plugged into its amp and ready to go, in the kitchen. Playing requires almost no setup time, so I can play one song or many and not waste minutes on each end getting things out and putting them away.
                                All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

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