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Bridge Pickup to go with Fender CS 69

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  • Bridge Pickup to go with Fender CS 69

    Hello everyone, I'm a newcomer to this nice forum.

    I want to install a HB to go with middle and neck Fender Custom Shop 69. I am inclined to go with Seymour Duncan JB Jr. Anyone know about these combination? The Jb Jr will vastly outclass the CS69's? Any other recomendation?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Are you going to install the Seymour Duncan SJBJ-1b JB Jr. strat sized pickup or a full sized HB?

    Before buying a full sized, you want to check under the pick guard to see if you have a boat route,
    If the route is for singles I'd advise going with a strat sized HB so you don't butcher the guitar trying to get a full sized HB in there. You devalue the instrument badly when you do that. If its got a boat route then its simply a matter of buying a SSH pickguard and switching things over.

    As far as getting a tonal Balance between them I don't think it would be the best choice. The stock pickups 5.8K ohms, 2.2 Henries. You're planning to put a super hot pickup of nearly 17K in there that easily has double the output. When you select two pickups the single wont even be heard and when you switch completely over to a single the sound will be highly anemic compared to the HB.

    I've done several Strat mods with full sized HB's and I get a decent balance between singles when I use something closer to a standard PAF that has an impedance of less then 8K. This way there isn't such a huge jump in voltage output between them. It gets the HB drive when cranked up but still blends with the singles.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by WRGKMC View Post
      ...
      I've done several Strat mods with full sized HB's and I get a decent balance between singles when I use something closer to a standard PAF that has an impedance of less then 8K. This way there isn't such a huge jump in voltage output between them. It gets the HB drive when cranked up but still blends with the singles.
      In the interest of accurate terminology, it's not impedance that we measure when comparing pickups but DC resistance.

      Although copper wire is a conductor, it also presents some resistance. The longer the wire, the higher the resistance (with all else being equal).

      Measuring the DC resistance of a guitar pickup will give us a comparative indication of wire length and therefore the number of turns in the coil of wire. More turns of wire in a magnetic field translates into the capability of more electric current being generated in the coil.
      As a human being, you come with the whole range of inner possibilities
      from the deepest hell to the highest states.

      It is up to you which one you choose to explore
      .

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      • WRGKMC
        WRGKMC commented
        Editing a comment
        Probably not the best wording but the point I was trying to make is the two pickups are seen as AC wave generators and are seen as an impedance by the amp just like any other AC device weather it be a Mic a speaker, a pickup etc. When one has a much weaker output then the other, the stronger signal masks the output of the weaker. When the two have closer outputs the signals will be a blend of the two.

        DC resistance isn't an accurate factor. I know we use it as a yardstick all the time when trying to match pickups, but its actually the inductance measured in Henry's and the strength of the Magnetic field that play as big, if not much bigger in determining the signal strength. You can have two coils with identical DC resistance, and one with stronger magnets and higher henry's and have a much stronger output. Some of this is based on wire thickness, permeability of the core, magnetic strength/focus etc.

        Likewise, some pickups can have a high DC resistance and a weak magnetics and poor permeability and have a very weak output. Some of the DC resistance may be a factor in the balancing the two, but the amp only sees the total so its essentially the impedance "The effective resistance of an electric circuit or component to alternating current, arising from the combined effects of ohmic resistance and reactance" between the two that matters when getting a blend.

    • #4
      Really appreciate all the good advices. I will go with a more balanced pickup!

      Thanks everybody

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      • #5
        I got the CS 69's when they first came out. The neck and mid pickups were perfect for that late 60's / early 70's Fender Strat sound, but for me, the bridge pickup was way too trebley to my ears, so I dropped in a Schaller S6 pickup with 6 mm. Alnico 5 poles.
        The neck / mid CS 69's pickups were rated between 6.7 and or 6.9 k ohms, while S6 rated at 13.4k ohms, worked well for me, classic late 60's tone but with stronger mids / bass kick at the bridge.

        One question .
        Did your Fender CS 69 pickup have the letters AY with a date written with a fine black ink pen ?
        Last edited by AJ6stringsting; 11-03-2017, 10:39 AM.
        How many guitarists does it take to screw in a lightbulb ? Five , one to screw it in , hit the switch and four to sit around bragging how much better they could have done it !!!! 😱👹😲

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        • #6
          why do you want to swap the bridge pickup? what is your goal of the switch? if we would get an idea what you dislike in the cs69 bridge pickup, maybe we could give you a suggestion what you might like more...

          i have put a kinman woodstock+ set into my strat, altough it lost some of the strat jangle, its a great plus there is no noise anymore and the bridge pickup does have more bite and sounds fuller and more heavy than the stock pickup which sounded a bit to shrill

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