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Most melodic jazz soloist?

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  • Most melodic jazz soloist?

    Hi, I am looking for some recommendations of jazz records to listen to, to get more acquainted with the genre. I like traditional jazz the most, some Satchmo (All Stars, Hot 5s & 7s), some Django, etc. Listening to a couple Grant Green records at the moment too.

    I would like to know who you think is the jazz soloist (on guitar or any other instrument, and from any era) that plays the most melodic solos. Not so much super-fast playing, but solos that are a memorable melody on their own right. That you can sing in the shower, say.

    Any recommendations? Miles? Bix? Hawk? What albums?

    (What I have listened to from Coltrane and Parker I don't think would pass the "sing in the shower" test by the way )

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Bix Beiderbecke, "I'm coming Virginia" To me, this song IS the jazz age--very evocative. The Wolverines weren't much, but when Bix cuts in with his solo you can tell the difference between Jazz and Inspiration.

    Chet Baker's better work in the fifties with Gerry Mulligan.

    Paul Desmond--One of three saxophonists with the chops to dare to play alto after Parker.

    Sonny Rollins. "Blue Seven" Nine notes taken to a 13 minute jazz masterpiece with perfect logic, diction and lyricism. Aruguably the greatest jazz recording ever.

    Modern Jazz Quartet.

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    • #3
      To compare Coltrane and Parker in terms of melodic playing isn't fair. Parker's playing is sometimtes fast as hell but he stays very musical and melodic. Coltrane didn't. Sometimtes he played beautiful music but other times he just made ****************loads of noise.

      The melodic master IMO is Lester Young. Roy Eldridge is no idiot either. These guys had some serious chops but seldom showed it and played strictly for the tune. Sometimes all you'll hear Lester Young do is play a part of the melody as it's written (with maybe some minor embellishment) but doing it so beautifully that you can't think of anything better he could have done.

      A melodic master who knew how to work around her own limtations was Billie Holiday. With a very narrow vocal range she manages to get so much music out of her instrument it's nothing short of a miracle. She will also change the melodies in subtle and yet fundamental ways.

      Sometimes "melodic player" seems to mean someone who can't play that much, someone whose chops aren't as impressive but who has a great tone, or at least a unique one. Sometimes I think this is true for Miles Davis.
      Terje Larsson

      inbox is full, send e-mail instead

      Hey, wanna look at my comics? Come here then http://terjelarssonserier.blogspot.com/

      Ah, sorry, it's all in swedish, but you can always look!

      You can also check out my crazy friend Dan's crazy website where he'll teach you to master the guitar in 8 minutes (or days... or whatever).

      http://spytunes.co.uk/

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      • #4
        For sweet playing I'd recommend Stan Getz. Lots of players, but guys who develop song melodies usually get my vote.
        The ancient Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu, sometimes called the first libertarian thinker, said, "The more artificial taboos and restrictions there are in the world, the more the people are impoverished. ... The more that laws and regulations are given prominence, the more thieves and robbers there will be."

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        • #5
          For sweet playing I'd recommend Stan Getz.


          100% X 10 !!!!

          I have learned SO MUCH working with recordings from Stans and Bill Evans.
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          • #6
            As guitarists go, Ed Bickert rarely puts a foot wrong, melodically speaking.
            Fast, clean and cheap.

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            • #7
              i dont think these are definite answers....
              but...

              sax - Joe Henderson or Sonny Rollins

              trumpet - Miles

              piano - wynton kelly

              guitar - Grant Green or Jim Hall

              ..............

              heh actually now that ive written those out...

              i take it back. i cant choose a "most melodic" jazz soloist...

              if you aint playin melodies, you aint playin jazz!

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              • #8

                Sometimes "melodic player" seems to mean someone who can't play that much, someone whose chops aren't as impressive but who has a great tone, or at least a unique one. Sometimes I think this is true for Miles Davis.


                i think itd be hard to argue that Miles didnt have "impressive chops" considering his output in the 60's

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                • #9
                  Here's a few...impossible to rank the greats, there's too many


                  Sax
                  Sonny Rollins
                  Lester Young
                  Art Pepper
                  Dexter Gordon

                  Here's a list of sax players...

                  http://philbrodieband.com/muso_solos_saxophonists.htm

                  Guitarists
                  John Scofield
                  Joe Pass
                  Tal Farlow
                  **This space for rent. Inquire at office.**

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                  • #10
                    Hi, I am looking for some recommendations of jazz records to listen to, to get more acquainted with the genre. I like traditional jazz the most, some Satchmo (All Stars, Hot 5s & 7s), some Django, etc. Listening to a couple Grant Green records at the moment too.

                    I would like to know who you think is the jazz soloist (on guitar or any other instrument, and from any era) that plays the most melodic solos. Not so much super-fast playing, but solos that are a memorable melody on their own right. That you can sing in the shower, say.

                    Any recommendations? Miles? Bix? Hawk? What albums?

                    (What I have listened to from Coltrane and Parker I don't think would pass the "sing in the shower" test by the way )

                    Thanks!


                    You already named the two that I'd name for your question. Louis Armstrong and Django.
                    **********************

                    www.thesymbolsband.com

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                    • #11
                      Lee Morgan...hands down my favorite soloist on any instrument (he plays trumpet)...He recorded a lot with Art Blakey,but was a sideman on many a Blue Note release, as well as leading a lot of sessions.

                      Check out Blakey's Jazz Messengers "The Big Beat", Jimmy Smith's "The Sermon", as well as Morgan's "Search For The New Land", "Tomcat", "Infinity", and, well the list goes on. A very fine example of funky hard bop playing.

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                      • #12
                        Lee Morgan...hands down my favorite soloist on any instrument (he plays trumpet)...He recorded a lot with Art Blakey,but was a sideman on many a Blue Note release, as well as leading a lot of sessions.

                        Check out Blakey's Jazz Messengers "The Big Beat", Jimmy Smith's "The Sermon", as well as Morgan's "Search For The New Land", "Tomcat", "Infinity", and, well the list goes on. A very fine example of funky hard bop playing.


                        I really like Lee Morgan.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks everybody! I will be checking out all your recommendations.

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                          • #14
                            i think itd be hard to argue that Miles didnt have "impressive chops" considering his output in the 60's


                            Miles was genius, a musical innovator and had the best bands ever. That said he wasn't much of a composer and as a trumpet player he wasn't technically anywhere near people like Dizzy Gillespie or Clifford Brown.

                            One can of course argue about this forever. That's not so interesting perhaps. I like Miles. There's something mean about him that I find really entertaining in the same way I sometimes find violent films entertaining. He's dangerous.
                            Terje Larsson

                            inbox is full, send e-mail instead

                            Hey, wanna look at my comics? Come here then http://terjelarssonserier.blogspot.com/

                            Ah, sorry, it's all in swedish, but you can always look!

                            You can also check out my crazy friend Dan's crazy website where he'll teach you to master the guitar in 8 minutes (or days... or whatever).

                            http://spytunes.co.uk/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Jim hall, by far. All he plays are ideas and melodies, never licks or 'lines'

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