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Alesis PicoVerb

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  • Alesis PicoVerb

    I've had one of these for a few years mostly using it with boards that don't have internal effects. I want to get a rack-mount (aka no-wall-wart) version but the specs of Alesis's rack-mount effects are rather crappy? This little guy has 24 bit conversion (48ks/s) with 28 bit processing and their rack mount stuff seems to be 18/24 bit . I fired it up at practice last night and it just sounds incredible on Chorus/Room 1 . I could just double-stick tape it to one of my rack units so the face peeks out the front but thought I'd ask if anyone else has swapped out their Picoverb for a rack-mount unit that was as good or better? Did I mention that this thing sounds awesome ?

    "We Have Met the Enemy and He is Us" - Walt Kelly​

  • #2
    I think they all sound pretty similar.
    <div class="signaturecontainer">-</div>

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    • #3
      Alesis stuff is pretty good for what it is. The Pico doesn't have the parameter adjust though where the nanoverb does. I usually gaff tape the wall wart to the power conditioner (or powerstrip gaff taped to a blank rack panel mounted on the back of a rack). Zip tie power cables together and zipties audio too...
      <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.rock-bot.com" target="_blank">www.rock-bot.com</a><br />
      Live-Band-Karaoke<br />
      <br />
      bassist and sound reinforcement</div>

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      • #4
        If you don't want to get a rack tray (I have some for sale locally, you may as well order one since shipping will be more than the tray) you can alway use stick back velcro tape. Works wonders and lighter than a rack tray.
        <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.rock-bot.com" target="_blank">www.rock-bot.com</a><br />
        Live-Band-Karaoke<br />
        <br />
        bassist and sound reinforcement</div>

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        • #5
          BTW, they all use a wall wart, rack mount or not.
          <div class="signaturecontainer">-</div>

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          • #6
            The Pico doesn't have the parameter adjust though where the nanoverb does...
            ...but the PicoVerb runs more "bits" than the NanoVerb - 24/28 vs. 18/24 . I've seen reviews saying you can tell the difference - not sure if it is true?

            "We Have Met the Enemy and He is Us" - Walt Kelly​

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            • #7
              i dont think it will make much difference in a live situation. i occasionally run a 16 bit lexicon live and it sounds as great as any reverb i ever use, maybe better than some. not sure the bit rate of spx90's but i use those quite often and no issues with low bit rates.
              <div class="signaturecontainer">band status - &quot;its complicated&quot;</div>

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              • #8
                The processing bit rate and depth, plus conversion bitrate are for all intensive purposes marketing numbers these days. I have worked and designed extensively with these chipsets and the algorithms (software) are by far the most important component to the sound of the effects. This is where Alesis had a big lead on the industry.

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                • #9
                  not sure the bit rate of spx90's but i use those quite often and no issues with low bit rates.
                  I've got the manual in front of me - 31.25ks/s and an advertised bandwidth of 20hz-12khz .

                  "We Have Met the Enemy and He is Us" - Walt Kelly​

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                  • #10
                    I've got the manual in front of me - 31.25ks/s and an advertised bandwidth of 20hz-12khz .


                    That's just about right. Nothing wrong at all for the intended application, which is for effects generation.

                    When writing effects software, one of the most important parameters for realistic efefcts is the early reflection LPF, which generally starts around 8-10kHz. You don't want fx response up too high because that's not what the real thing sounds like. Then there's multiple rolloffs that very quickly attenuate the high freq. after the initial reflection.

                    This is a good example of where specs. mean nothing regarding how a unit sounds or works in the real world. What's important is that the folks writing the effects understand for you, and in this case Yamaha and Alesis are unquestioned leaders.

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                    • #11
                      That's just about right. Nothing wrong at all for the intended application, which is for effects generation.
                      I agree for reverb type effects. I often run a short delay (doubler) on vocals and I like that to have the same frequency response as the source material. 12k is just too low for my comfort . I'm sure I'll fire up the old SPX90 to see how it sounds. Also gettin' an old Furman rackmount mechanical reverb .

                      "We Have Met the Enemy and He is Us" - Walt Kelly​

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                      • #12
                        Even for doubling vocals, if the delayed signal has the same response as the initial signal it will tend to interfere. Again, it's normal to roll off the HF response to get a doubled signal to fit into the mix. It helps fatten up the vocal without siblinance artifacts.

                        When dealing with vocals, the natural vocal tends to roll off normally also, so excessive extension can create issues that otherwise wouldn't exist.

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                        • #13
                          It helps fatten up the vocal without siblinance artifacts.
                          Interesting. I suppose as long as you're mixing the SPX90 effect in via an aux return and not using it on an insert you still get the above 12.5K stuff. I'm assuming the SPX90 doesn't have an analog "dry" path for mixing?

                          "We Have Met the Enemy and He is Us" - Walt Kelly​

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                          • #14
                            Interesting. I suppose as long as you're mixing the SPX90 effect in via an aux return and not using it on an insert you still get the above 12.5K stuff. I'm assuming the SPX90 doesn't have an analog "dry" path for mixing?


                            Effects are usually returned through a stereo (or mono) channel strip on a mixer. This way you can EQ the effects, send a small amount to the monitors if you want and have fingertip control of the return via the fader.

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                            • #15
                              Even inserted, the dry mix path is generally full bandwidth. It's the way it's done.

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