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  • #16


    Thyat guyz electrican has an add-on 'let's try this instead of doing it right' hazard setup in the dude's home and it's rigged like something from Wiring For Dummies. I don't like or approve of the setup. Come on, the dude stated that he was getting a ground from a GFI in a circuit without a ground wire. How much more do I need to learn to understand that he is either a moron or a BS'r?


    Adding GFCI's to an ungrounded system is not wrong. Wrong is not following code. Wrong is doing something like sinking a "20 foot" ground rod and running leads to your grounded devices. There's no indication that the system was installed wrong. What led you to that conclusion?

    You should note that the "dude" who was talking to the OP was not an electrician, and didn't need to use the correct terminology to describe that he was resetting the GFCI. Is anyone who is not up on electrical terminology a "moron or a BS'r"?
    .....

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    • #17
      my comments were basically driven by my understanding of code and you do not re-device a home with a grounded device if there is no ground wires in the circuit. It is bad form and practice.


      No, it is not. See NEC:


      Article 406.3(D)(3) Non-grounding-Type Receptacles. Where grounding means does not exist in the receptacle enclosure, the installation shall comply with (D)(3)(a), (D)(3)(b), (D)(3)(b).

      (a) A non-grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with another non-grounding-type receptacle(s).

      (b) A non-grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with a ground-fault circuit interrupter-type of receptacle(s). These receptacles shall be marked "No Equipment Ground." An equipment grounding conductor shall not be connected from the ground-fault circuit interrupter-type receptacle to any outlet supplied from the ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacle.

      (c) A non-grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with a grounding-type receptacle(s) where supplied through a ground-fault circuit interrupter. Grounding-type receptacles supplied through the ground-fault circuit interrupter shall be marked "GFCI Protected" and "No Equipment Ground." An equipment grounding conductor shall not be connected between the grounding-type receptacles.
      .....

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      • #18
        There's no indication that the system was installed wrong. What led you to that conclusion?


        The OP stated that there was no ground wire on the outlet that was in use during the fry down. He stated that the electrician was "picking it up up here, on the GFI". Don't work that way bro, you know that.

        An ungrounded home in Canada is realitivly common. Just used creative intuition and deductive reasoning and talked about the description the OP gave of the experience, not the house you may have in the suburbs WITH THE 20' GROUNDROD RIGHT NEXT TO YOUR ELECTRICAL METER TO CONFORM TO CODE

        I didn't miss nothin, just used my ability to COMPREHEND wirtten english as well as read it
        Remember These Daze

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        • #19
          An ungrounded home in Canada is realitivly common. Just used creative intuition and deductive reasoning and talked about the description the OP gave of the experience, not the house you may have in the suburbs WITH THE 20' GROUNDROD RIGHT NEXT TO YOUR ELECTRICAL METER TO CONFORM TO CODE

          I didn't miss nothin, just used my ability to COMPREHEND wirtten english as well as read it


          Per NEC 250.52(A)(5):

          Rod and Pipe Electrodes. Rod and pipe electrodes shall not be less than 2.5m (8ft) in length...

          The only situation requiring a 20ft. electrode is for concrete-encased electrodes as commonly used in commercial and industrial footings.

          To conform to code, a driven rod needs to be 8ft.
          .....

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          • #20
            Per NEC 250.52(A)(5):
            Rod and Pipe Electrodes. Rod and pipe electrodes shall not be less than 2.5m (8ft) in length...

            The only situation requiring a 20ft. electrode is for concrete-encased electrodes as commonly used in commercial and industrial footings.

            To conform to code, a driven rod needs to be 8ft.


            Thank you Craig.

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            • #21
              Thank you Craig.


              +1
              Remember These Daze

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