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Friday Influences Thread 02-01-13

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  • Friday Influences Thread 02-01-13

    And happy February to YOU! Post something that lets us know what you've either been listening to lately, or perhaps something from long ago that has had a part in bringing us the wonderful you that is you.

     

    (I'm vying for a gig writing for that company who makes the Coexist and Namaste bumper stickers)

     

    _____________

     

     

    My dad bought me a  wonderful gift for Christmas. How to Listen to and Understand Great Music. 48 CDs of lectures. It connects with the nerd in me. I'm almost halfway through. Among many bits of music I've heard and learned about since Christmas, I would have to say that the contrast between these two pieces, separated by roughly 75 years, and the invention of the piano, which could play from loud to soft, piano-forte, shortened to just "piano". What a leap. But it was a leap of linearity. Without the one, you couldn't have had the other. Prior to the piano, the harpsichord was it baby. One volume. And the music reflected that sort of kinetic drive of the separate lines to create the whole. But with the piano-forte, pfft! Ludwig could get down right moody on your ass. A new era had begun.

     

    The difference between music about process and surface complexity, on the one hand, and vocal lyricism and studied simplicity on the other. From this... (for your onw sanity, start at 1:43 with the fugue)

     

     

    To this...

     

    Thomas Jefferson said... "The day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the Supreme Being as His father, in the womb of a virgin will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerva in the brain of Jupiter." hmmm...

  • #2

    I can't stop listening to this

     

    The simple beauty of it is very inspiring. Just write great songs and sing them well.

     

    Comment


    • Lee Knight
      Lee Knight commented
      Editing a comment

      stickboymusic wrote:

      I can't stop listening to this

       

      The simple beauty of it is very inspiring. Just write great songs and sing them well.

       


       

      A couple of things. First, what a great tune and cool performance of it. Second, Art sitting down is taller than Paul. And third...

       

      ...Stick, I love your quote, "Just write great songs and sing them well." Why didn't I think of that! It reminds my of my old buddy and band leader Mark DeCerbo. A very good writer in the style of Squeeze/McCartney/etc. We'd be either rehearsing or even tracking in the studio and he'd nicely turn to one of the players, might be me, might not, and he'd say, "Come up with something cool for right there."

       

      Well hell! Why not?!?!  Amazingly, sometimes is really does happen that way if you let it.


    • rsadasiv
      rsadasiv commented
      Editing a comment

      Had to say goodbye to the real life Allie today.

       

      http://angarai.blogspot.com/2012/09/for-allie-on-her-40th-birthday.html


  • #3
    Anytime someone posts S&G, I'm gonna agree with their awesomeness.

    Comment


    • LCK
      LCK commented
      Editing a comment

      bee3 wrote:
      Anytime someone posts S&G, I'm gonna agree with their awesomeness.

      And I'm gonna agree with you.

       

       


  • #4

    Lee Knight wrote:

    _____________

     

    My dad bought me a  wonderful gift for Christmas. How to Listen to and Understand Great Music. 48 CDs of lectures.  

    But with the piano-forte, pfft! Ludwig could get down right moody on your ass. A new era had begun.

     

    Wow, great gift.  I see on Amazon there's a DVD edition of it - not cheap!  

     

    I ran across these "playing and explaining" videos by pianist Adras Schiff on the Guardian UK website - all about the LVB piano sonatas which I've kind of made a study of (in an amatuer way) over lots of years.  

     

    There are numerous mediocre lecturerers floating around the web on Classical and other types of music - so finding these lectures that imho are both enlightening and entertaining made for a few good days:

     

    http://music.guardian.co.uk/classical/page/0,,1943867,00.html

     

    nat whilk ii

     

     

     

     

     

    Comment


    • rsadasiv
      rsadasiv commented
      Editing a comment

       

       

      I should've known
      the minute that we hit the wall
      I should've known
      the writing was upon the stall
      I should've known
      'cause Rome was starting to fall

      I should've known
      it was coming down to this
      I should've known

       


  • #5

    My favorite love song. (Second favorite: "My Funny Valentine.")



     



    music and social stuff | The Forgotify Files | A Year of Songs | mutant pop on facebook | roots acoustic on facebook


    The chorus seems a little weak... I think it needs more lasers.

    Comment


    • rsadasiv
      rsadasiv commented
      Editing a comment
      I smiled because it was our last chat
      And sometimes that's all you can do to keep from crying

  • #6

    Bob Dylan is well known for 'rewriting' folk songs from the public domain.


    But he didn't always constrain his jumping off spots to stuff that was out of copyright. I was pretty much unaware of this 1960 song until now... turns out Paul Clayton used an earlier public domain song to write his song, taught the changes to Dylan, and Dylan used the Clayton song as inspiration for his own...




    Dylan once introduced "Don't Think Twice, It's All Right" as "a statement that maybe you can say to make yourself feel better... as if you were talking to yourself." The song was written around the time that Suze Rotolo indefinitely prolonged her stay in Italy. The melody is based on an older song, "Who's Gonna Buy Your Chickens When I'm Gone."[1] The melody was taught to Dylan by folksinger Paul Clayton, who had used the melody in his song "Who's Gonna Buy Your Ribbon Saw."


    As well as the melody, a couple of lines were taken from Clayton's "Who's Goin' to Buy You Ribbons When I'm Gone?" which was recorded in 1960, two years before Dylan wrote "Don't Think Twice." Lines taken word-for-word or slightly altered from the Clayton song are, "T'ain't no use to sit and wonder why, darlin'," and, "So I'm walkin' down that long, lonesome road." On the first release of the song, instead of "So I'm walkin' down that long, lonesome road babe, where I'm bound, I can't tell" Dylan sings "So long, honey babe, where I'm bound, I can't tell". The lyrics were changed when Dylan performed live versions of the song and on cover versions recorded by other artists. Both Clayton's song and Dylan's song were based on the public domain traditional song "Who's Gonna Buy Your Chickens When I'm Gone".[2]


    It has been argued that the original album version of the song is played in a fast, fingerstyle manner by Bruce Langhorne.[3] However, Eyolf



    music and social stuff | The Forgotify Files | A Year of Songs | mutant pop on facebook | roots acoustic on facebook


    The chorus seems a little weak... I think it needs more lasers.

    Comment


    • bee3
      bee3 commented
      Editing a comment

      Ram - I don't follow?


  • #7
    Does this mean you dislike the music that moved me at 14?
    Thomas Jefferson said... "The day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the Supreme Being as His father, in the womb of a virgin will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerva in the brain of Jupiter." hmmm...

    Comment


    • LCK
      LCK commented
      Editing a comment

      Lee Knight wrote:
      Does this mean you dislike the music that moved me at 14?

      Not me. I was quite enamored of Deep Purple at one time.

      And a song that starts out with my favorite piece by Beethoven? That morphs into a Beatles classic? What's not to love?

      Okay, maybe it's a bit excessive...

      Then there's this cover of a Donovan tune.

      Certainly Jon Lord and Ritchie Blackmore were incredible musicians.


  • #8
    To blue

    Damn iPhone
    Thomas Jefferson said... "The day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the Supreme Being as His father, in the womb of a virgin will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerva in the brain of Jupiter." hmmm...

    Comment


    • LCK
      LCK commented
      Editing a comment

      Some days I think this is the best Beatles song ever.

      Today is one of those days...

       


  • #9
    Go man go, but not like a yo-yo schoolboy.

    Wow, I followed Dixon for years as a producer but didn't know he had this in him. Very cool boy.
    Thomas Jefferson said... "The day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the Supreme Being as His father, in the womb of a virgin will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerva in the brain of Jupiter." hmmm...

    Comment


    • LCK
      LCK commented
      Editing a comment

      Lee Knight wrote:
      Go man go, but not like a yo-yo schoolboy.

      Wow, I followed Dixon for years as a producer but didn't know he had this in him. Very cool boy.
      I've been digging this song for 20 years or so. But today, when I listened to it again, I thought of how much it sounds like a Lee Knight production! Very cool, boy, cool!

  • #10

    I don't normally post stuff just because there's a killer player on a track... but I couldn't hear this father-son-echo-pedal jam without sharing it. The groove is mighty worn by the end of the loop-dominated jam, but the jazz violin playing from young Myles Thompson is really something. Father, Tim, is, himself, a hot guitarist with a clear background in bebop technique but more of a 70s rock vibe to some of his own songs. But it's Myles who steals the show. I've only heard one of their studio efforts -- which was nice, but didn't really capture the fire and edge below. But, clearly, Myles is someone to watch. 




    music and social stuff | The Forgotify Files | A Year of Songs | mutant pop on facebook | roots acoustic on facebook


    The chorus seems a little weak... I think it needs more lasers.

    Comment


    • LCK
      LCK commented
      Editing a comment

      Hmmm, let me see... Superbowl Sunday... in New Orleans... rock 'n' roll influences...

      Of course! Who's more influential than this cat?

      He was a huge influence for this song (no pun intended)...


    • LCK
      LCK commented
      Editing a comment

      blue2blue wrote:

      I don't normally post stuff just because there's a killer player on a track... but I couldn't hear this father-son-echo-pedal jam without sharing it. The groove is mighty worn by the end of the loop-dominated jam, but the jazz violin playing from young Myles Thompson is really something.


      Like Django Reinhardt & St


  • #11
    Hey wait a second. Maybe that guy's French or something! :-)
    Thomas Jefferson said... "The day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the Supreme Being as His father, in the womb of a virgin will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerva in the brain of Jupiter." hmmm...

    Comment


    • LCK
      LCK commented
      Editing a comment

      Lee Knight wrote:
      Hey wait a second. Maybe that guy's French or something! :-)

      Sure! That would explain the neck hair, right?



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