Jump to content

Is Scalloping My Frets a Bad Idea?


IAmAScientist

Recommended Posts

  • Members

I would like to have a nicely scalloped fret board but I don't want to f my whole neck up. Now, I've NEVER done actual work on the wood of a guitar, but I've got a steady hand and am pretty good at this kind of thing. My questions are 1) is this going to have to be refinished and 2) have you ever done this yourself?

 

Any advice is welcomed.

 

http://www.projectguitar.com/tut/scalloped.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

It's not easy to do correctly. However, even if you do it correctly, you're almost certain to cause death or serious injury to the neck of the guitar.

Most necks are constructed so that all of the wood forms a part of their essential structure. Taking a significant amount of wood out of the neck will render it highly susceptible to warpage. Professionally scalloped OEM necks are generally designed differently. Either they feature a dual expanding or other particularly stable truss rod design, or the loss of wood is otherwise compensated for. Even these don't tend to be the most stable necks.

If you've ever played a scallopped neck, it's not that different in terms of feel from a standard neck with large, say Dunlop 6100 or 6000 frets. You would probably be better off having the neck refretted with large frets. Once they're big enough that you can't feel the wood at all, scallopping won't make any difference.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Yeah, I assumed that scalloping the neck would just about completely ruin the sucker. Now, let's say I decide to do it anyway. Should I remove the neck before I start? Or can I leave it attached? Is there anything holding the neck to the body besides the four screws? I've never taken the neck off of my guitar before...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Let's see... You've never done it before? And you're not an experieced woodworker???

Yep, you'll f*ck it up.

Even if you do this correctly, there is no going back. Once you do it, you can't undo it.

If you REALLY want to try this just buy a neck and experiment on the replacement neck. That way if you botch it or don't like it you can just put the original neck back on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Originally posted by IAmAScientist

Yeah, I assumed that scalloping the neck would just about completely ruin the sucker. Now, let's say I decide to do it anyway. Should I remove the neck before I start? Or can I leave it attached? Is there anything holding the neck to the body besides the four screws? I've never taken the neck off of my guitar before...

 

 

just the fact that you are asking this question suggests the job is a bad idea for you. start with some simpler jobs then work your way up to this

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
Originally posted by MBET

Let's see... You've never done it before? And you're not an experieced woodworker???


Yep, you'll f*ck it up.


Even if you do this correctly, there is no going back. Once you do it, you can't undo it.


If you REALLY want to try this just buy a neck and experiment on the replacement neck. That way if you botch it or don't like it you can just put the original neck back on.



Dude, it's not rocket science :rolleyes:

I did my strat, and it was fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Originally posted by MrMunky

It's not easy to do correctly. However, even if you do it correctly, you're almost certain to cause death or serious injury to the neck of the guitar.


Most necks are constructed so that all of the wood forms a part of their essential structure. Taking a significant amount of wood out of the neck will render it highly susceptible to warpage. Professionally scalloped OEM necks are generally designed differently. Either they feature a dual expanding or other particularly stable truss rod design, or the loss of wood is otherwise compensated for. Even these don't tend to be the most stable necks.


If you've ever played a scallopped neck, it's not that different in terms of feel from a standard neck with large, say Dunlop 6100 or 6000 frets. You would probably be better off having the neck refretted with large frets. Once they're big enough that you can't feel the wood at all, scallopping won't make any difference.

 

 

 

Sorry but I disagree with everypoint that you have made. It is super easy to do correctly if you do it by hand without dremels or sanders.

 

Scalloping doesn't go deep enough to effect the necks stability.

 

Large frets feel nothing like a scalloped

 

IAmAScientist -- go over and ask the same question in the AMP forum because most of the scallop guys are over there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
Originally posted by flathead

m4613831-9438.jpg

You need a close-up to have a better appreciation of it.




that looks like fossilized elephant {censored}. o well, its only cuz yngwie is the best strat player ever. he's so much better than jimi, clapton, page, and all those guys. they can't play. yngwie has the greatest tone and he's classically trained so you know he's the best. (a little holiday sarcasm)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...