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Martin d-28 vs. hd-28

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  • Martin d-28 vs. hd-28

    I'm sure that this has been done before, but it was never taken far enough imo.

    SO which one?

    It seems to me that the hd-28 always sounds slightly better, but I've heard that it only sounds better new and over time it becomes "mushy" sounding. It also is more expensive than the d-28.

    What do you guys think?
    -kc-







    Originally Posted by Gixxer1k



    So, I have to ask, to Taylor or not to Taylor? What say you?









    Originally Posted by Michael Martin


    I say: chick guitar. Real men play Gibsons. Or, if they like great sound but have no sense of style, Martins. If they are wealthy, Collings. On a budget? Yammie. Of course.

    I've also heard that metrosexual electric players with girly-fingers favor Ovations.

  • #2
    Well I found that the HD-28 has more volume and more overtones due to scalloped braces I've not heard that they go mushie after time if anything the more you play the better they sound because the top is opening up

    Comment


    • #3
      I own an HD28 so am biased, but to me it just has more power, projection and tone.
      I really don't buy the "it goes mushy over time" argument. The HD28 is made closer in spec to the pre war herringbone D28's than modern day D28's are. I don't hear anyone complaining that they've gone mushy over the years.
      For me it stacks up like this - the D28 is a good guitar, the HD28 is a very good guitar.
      If you can afford the price differential then buy the HD. Otherwise buy the D. Either way you're getting a great guitar.
      When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity. When a million people suffer from a delusion, it is called religion.

      Comment


      • #4
        I owned a 1984 Brazilian rosewood HD-28 made to prewar specs. One of their first "pre-war spec special issue" models. Went to mush on me. So, slag and bridgepin, I guess now you heard someone complain.
        "I don't want to be immortalized through my work. I want to be immortalized by not dying." Woody Allen

        Comment


        • #5
          Different gits, same subject.

          http://acapella.harmony-central.com/showthread.php?t=2351410

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm staying out of this one.

            Tom

            Comment


            • #7
              It's funny that you're staying out of this one considering you already expressed your opinion in the other thread.

              Thanks guitarcapo for having an educated opinion on the subject. I have been told that I should really try to pick through the d-28's and find a real keeper and it will be better than going for the hd. Do you agree?
              -kc-







              Originally Posted by Gixxer1k



              So, I have to ask, to Taylor or not to Taylor? What say you?









              Originally Posted by Michael Martin


              I say: chick guitar. Real men play Gibsons. Or, if they like great sound but have no sense of style, Martins. If they are wealthy, Collings. On a budget? Yammie. Of course.

              I've also heard that metrosexual electric players with girly-fingers favor Ovations.

              Comment


              • #8
                It's funny that you're staying out of this one considering you already expressed your opinion in the other thread.


                My point exactly. Thanks.
                Tom

                Comment


                • #9
                  Then again your sig expresses your opinion as well.

                  I'm surprised more people don't have opinions on this...
                  -kc-







                  Originally Posted by Gixxer1k



                  So, I have to ask, to Taylor or not to Taylor? What say you?









                  Originally Posted by Michael Martin


                  I say: chick guitar. Real men play Gibsons. Or, if they like great sound but have no sense of style, Martins. If they are wealthy, Collings. On a budget? Yammie. Of course.

                  I've also heard that metrosexual electric players with girly-fingers favor Ovations.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I owned a 1984 Brazilian rosewood HD-28 made to prewar specs. One of their first "pre-war spec special issue" models. Went to mush on me. So, slag and bridgepin, I guess now you heard someone complain.


                    Well.... your right now I have. Sorry to hear that guitar was a disappointment. I'm sure it came with a very high price tag to boot. But I'm still gald martin does give folks the option

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      HD 28 is a D-28 ON STEROIDS...it is about as simple as that!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        guitarcapo is not the only one who has expressed this sentiment, but I'm wondering if that is reason enough to avoid the scalloped braces.

                        I still find that the scalloped braces sound better than the non-scalloped braces. Should I just buy the hd anyway ignoring the possibility of it not lasting?
                        -kc-







                        Originally Posted by Gixxer1k



                        So, I have to ask, to Taylor or not to Taylor? What say you?









                        Originally Posted by Michael Martin


                        I say: chick guitar. Real men play Gibsons. Or, if they like great sound but have no sense of style, Martins. If they are wealthy, Collings. On a budget? Yammie. Of course.

                        I've also heard that metrosexual electric players with girly-fingers favor Ovations.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The one I played at GC sounded much better than the D28.
                          If you find your self alone riding in green fields with the sun in your face... do not be troubled, for you are in Elysium. And you are already dead! Brothers... what we do in life... echoes in eternity! (Gladiator)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Well.... your right now I have. Sorry to hear that guitar was a disappointment. I'm sure it came with a very high price tag to boot. But I'm still gald martin does give folks the option



                            It wasn't so bad. I paid $3600 at Mandolin Bros./NYC for it... and ended up trading it in 5 years later for a nice Gibson J200 and a Martin 12 string at The Guitar Emporium in Louisville, Kentucky. Of course, most guitar stores didn't want to give me cash for it as much as I paid (Gruhn's were particularly cheap and snooty...saying something about how no one wants drednaught guitars anymore since Eric Clapton did his "Unplugged") This was around 1993 before Ebay was an option so I figured my best bet would be to try and get a store credit at some high end guitar shop.

                            I don't know if you ever played a guitar with an underbuilt top but the sound usually is very boomy without projection and the high strings don't ring but sound floppy and muddy. It also has the weird characteristic of sounding BETTER with extra light strings. It tames the bass overpowering everything but the volume is weak. When you strum chords it's almost like the notes are fighting each other and they clash in a way that's not very harmonious but sort of "clanks"

                            Guitar manufacturers these days seem to underbuild their tops more because they sound great in the store on day one when they are competing with other new guitars for your $$$. Taylor and those Epiphone Masterbuilts are a couple I've noticed like that. I had a Taylor 710CE that had it happen to also. Sounded great new but slowly over the years would only sound good with light gauge strings that were brand new.

                            Another weird characteristic I found with these underbuilt guitars is they sound better capoed up on the neck, probably because the higher strings balance out the boomy sound and the shorter scale tightens up the floppy response in the soundboard. I sort of used the Taylor more that way before eventually selling it on Ebay.

                            Martin knows about the problem but the public keeps asking for scallop bracing because of the mythology surrounding it. Every bracing feature that Martin used to weaken the top over their entire history combined into one guitar(smaller bridge plate, move the X brace toward the sound hole, thinner width braces, scallop everything) should make the ultimate guitar, right? Don't count on it. I've even heard that on some of Martin's recent limited special edition guitars that they included the estimated cost of future warranty work into the sale price.

                            Scallop bracing was a feature that worked well for Martin with their smaller guitars, but as their guitars got bigger it started giving them problems and they tried to get away from it. Now when a guitar gets old it will sound better, and it was easy for the public to look to these build features as the reason why the old guitars sounded better... when it might have been other things like the fact that the wood was older, the vintage guitars had been worked on by master luthiers more etc.

                            Bottom line is that you can underbuild a top...and it will start to sound bad before it fails structurally.
                            "I don't want to be immortalized through my work. I want to be immortalized by not dying." Woody Allen

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Tom

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