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  • cleaning jacks, pots, and switches of an amp. denoobulize me please

    Alright, so I picked up a can of control/contact cleaner and lubricant from Radioshack. I cleaned the tube sockets the way that it said in an old leaflet I have from Eurotubes (don't knock me ) by spraying the pins and working the tube in and out of the socket several times.



    How do I correctly clean all the other necessary components? I'm gonna pull the chassis out and give it a go soon, just want to make sure I do it well.



    Thanks
    <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="2"><div align="center">Ibanez JS-1000 / Ibanez RG3-120</div><div align="center">535Q &gt; Keeley Compressor &gt; Xotic Custom Shop BB Preamp &gt; Hartman Flanger</div><div align="center">Laney VH100R <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/cool.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Cool" class="inlineimg" /> / Laney GH50L <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/evil.gif" border="0" alt="" title="evil" class="inlineimg" /></div><div align="center">(MXR 10-band EQ &gt; Line 6 DL-4)</div><div align="center">Geezer Sound Co. 2x12 (80w ceramic WGS BL-80)</div><br />
    Also own: 1966 Fender Pro Reverb with Weber Californias, Dano CTO-1, Keeley SD-1, EHX D.EM <br />
    <br />
    <font size="1">Yes that's my girlfriend.</font></font></div>

  • #2
    Sometimes you just have to replace them.
    .

    Comment


    • #3
      Sometimes you just have to replace them.
      .

      Comment


      • #4






        Quote Originally Posted by Bucksstudent
        View Post

        Sometimes you just have to replace them.




        ok well that's not the case so how's about you tell me how to clean them?



        <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="2"><div align="center">Ibanez JS-1000 / Ibanez RG3-120</div><div align="center">535Q &gt; Keeley Compressor &gt; Xotic Custom Shop BB Preamp &gt; Hartman Flanger</div><div align="center">Laney VH100R <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/cool.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Cool" class="inlineimg" /> / Laney GH50L <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/evil.gif" border="0" alt="" title="evil" class="inlineimg" /></div><div align="center">(MXR 10-band EQ &gt; Line 6 DL-4)</div><div align="center">Geezer Sound Co. 2x12 (80w ceramic WGS BL-80)</div><br />
        Also own: 1966 Fender Pro Reverb with Weber Californias, Dano CTO-1, Keeley SD-1, EHX D.EM <br />
        <br />
        <font size="1">Yes that's my girlfriend.</font></font></div>

        Comment


        • #5






          Quote Originally Posted by Bucksstudent
          View Post

          Sometimes you just have to replace them.




          ok well that's not the case so how's about you tell me how to clean them?



          <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="2"><div align="center">Ibanez JS-1000 / Ibanez RG3-120</div><div align="center">535Q &gt; Keeley Compressor &gt; Xotic Custom Shop BB Preamp &gt; Hartman Flanger</div><div align="center">Laney VH100R <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/cool.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Cool" class="inlineimg" /> / Laney GH50L <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/evil.gif" border="0" alt="" title="evil" class="inlineimg" /></div><div align="center">(MXR 10-band EQ &gt; Line 6 DL-4)</div><div align="center">Geezer Sound Co. 2x12 (80w ceramic WGS BL-80)</div><br />
          Also own: 1966 Fender Pro Reverb with Weber Californias, Dano CTO-1, Keeley SD-1, EHX D.EM <br />
          <br />
          <font size="1">Yes that's my girlfriend.</font></font></div>

          Comment


          • #6






            Quote Originally Posted by Mike LX-R
            View Post

            by spraying the pins and working the tube in and out of the socket several times.




            same thing for the jacks.. but you will use a plug instead of the tube pins... work it in and out of the jacks...



            for pots, it's best to pull the chassis out and spray into the pot casing hole, then turn the pot back and forth real fast
            <div class="signaturecontainer"><br><br><a target="_blank" href="http://www.guitarampboard.com">http://www.guitarampboard.com</a><br><br><br>Like my band on FB: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.facebook.com/thefew1">http://www.facebook.com/thefew1</a><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>All prices include shipping to ConUS.</div>

            Comment


            • #7






              Quote Originally Posted by Mike LX-R
              View Post

              by spraying the pins and working the tube in and out of the socket several times.




              same thing for the jacks.. but you will use a plug instead of the tube pins... work it in and out of the jacks...



              for pots, it's best to pull the chassis out and spray into the pot casing hole, then turn the pot back and forth real fast
              <div class="signaturecontainer"><br><br><a target="_blank" href="http://www.guitarampboard.com">http://www.guitarampboard.com</a><br><br><br>Like my band on FB: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.facebook.com/thefew1">http://www.facebook.com/thefew1</a><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>All prices include shipping to ConUS.</div>

              Comment


              • #8






                Quote Originally Posted by guitarbilly74
                View Post

                same thing for the jacks.. but you will use a plug instead of the tube pins... work it in and out of the jacks...



                for pots, it's best to pull the chassis out and spray into the pot casing hole, then turn the pot back and forth real fast




                tomorrow night after work. this is good, something I should know how to do anyway. thanks!
                <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="2"><div align="center">Ibanez JS-1000 / Ibanez RG3-120</div><div align="center">535Q &gt; Keeley Compressor &gt; Xotic Custom Shop BB Preamp &gt; Hartman Flanger</div><div align="center">Laney VH100R <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/cool.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Cool" class="inlineimg" /> / Laney GH50L <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/evil.gif" border="0" alt="" title="evil" class="inlineimg" /></div><div align="center">(MXR 10-band EQ &gt; Line 6 DL-4)</div><div align="center">Geezer Sound Co. 2x12 (80w ceramic WGS BL-80)</div><br />
                Also own: 1966 Fender Pro Reverb with Weber Californias, Dano CTO-1, Keeley SD-1, EHX D.EM <br />
                <br />
                <font size="1">Yes that's my girlfriend.</font></font></div>

                Comment


                • #9






                  Quote Originally Posted by guitarbilly74
                  View Post

                  same thing for the jacks.. but you will use a plug instead of the tube pins... work it in and out of the jacks...



                  for pots, it's best to pull the chassis out and spray into the pot casing hole, then turn the pot back and forth real fast




                  tomorrow night after work. this is good, something I should know how to do anyway. thanks!
                  <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="2"><div align="center">Ibanez JS-1000 / Ibanez RG3-120</div><div align="center">535Q &gt; Keeley Compressor &gt; Xotic Custom Shop BB Preamp &gt; Hartman Flanger</div><div align="center">Laney VH100R <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/cool.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Cool" class="inlineimg" /> / Laney GH50L <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/evil.gif" border="0" alt="" title="evil" class="inlineimg" /></div><div align="center">(MXR 10-band EQ &gt; Line 6 DL-4)</div><div align="center">Geezer Sound Co. 2x12 (80w ceramic WGS BL-80)</div><br />
                  Also own: 1966 Fender Pro Reverb with Weber Californias, Dano CTO-1, Keeley SD-1, EHX D.EM <br />
                  <br />
                  <font size="1">Yes that's my girlfriend.</font></font></div>

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    For the jacks roll up a piece of super fine sandpaper or emery cloth. Start with about a 3"x4" square and roll it up. Put that in the jacks and spin it around clockwise. This will really remove any oxidation rust contaminants.



                    If you have the plastic Cliff or Rean type shorting jacks try this. First, get an ohm meter and check the continuity across each side of the jacks pins (side to side, not front to back) . With no phono plug inserted you should read a short or close to zero ohms across each set of pins (2 for mono jacks, 3 for stereo jacks). If you read 20 ohms of higher you need to burnish those contact points or replace the jack.



                    To repair these plastic style jacks:

                    Fold a small piece of emery paper or super fine sandpaper into a thin flat burnishing tool. Fold the paper flat just under the width of the jack shorting plug spacing (about 1/8"). Insert a phono jack or small thin screwdriver until you see the shorting lug lift. Insert the flattened sandpaper into that contact point. Pull the jack or screwdriver out which will clamp down on the sandpaper. Now slide the paper in and out. This is the best way to clean these type jacks without replacing them. When finished, check the resistance again (continuity) and look for the zero ohms or close to it reading across the shorting pins.



                    Since these PC mounted jacks often have stress fractures in the solder, be sure to check or simply resolder those pins on the board if needed. I usually just resolder them anyway to improve the integrity of that jacks connection.



                    Get some canned air or compressor and clean any debris from jacks, pots etc. Then spray your contact cleaner in the pots lubrication holes (small hole on the top of the pot casing) or from the underside of the terminals. Rock the controls quickly back and forth.



                    On some pots with smaller plastic shafts (some Marshall, Crate, Peavey) be careful the cleaner used does not damage plastic. Reason being is some cleaners can melt away where the internal wiper (variable part of the control) is press fitted into the pot's shaft. If that happens, you will be buying new pots.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      For the jacks roll up a piece of super fine sandpaper or emery cloth. Start with about a 3"x4" square and roll it up. Put that in the jacks and spin it around clockwise. This will really remove any oxidation rust contaminants.



                      If you have the plastic Cliff or Rean type shorting jacks try this. First, get an ohm meter and check the continuity across each side of the jacks pins (side to side, not front to back) . With no phono plug inserted you should read a short or close to zero ohms across each set of pins (2 for mono jacks, 3 for stereo jacks). If you read 20 ohms of higher you need to burnish those contact points or replace the jack.



                      To repair these plastic style jacks:

                      Fold a small piece of emery paper or super fine sandpaper into a thin flat burnishing tool. Fold the paper flat just under the width of the jack shorting plug spacing (about 1/8"). Insert a phono jack or small thin screwdriver until you see the shorting lug lift. Insert the flattened sandpaper into that contact point. Pull the jack or screwdriver out which will clamp down on the sandpaper. Now slide the paper in and out. This is the best way to clean these type jacks without replacing them. When finished, check the resistance again (continuity) and look for the zero ohms or close to it reading across the shorting pins.



                      Since these PC mounted jacks often have stress fractures in the solder, be sure to check or simply resolder those pins on the board if needed. I usually just resolder them anyway to improve the integrity of that jacks connection.



                      Get some canned air or compressor and clean any debris from jacks, pots etc. Then spray your contact cleaner in the pots lubrication holes (small hole on the top of the pot casing) or from the underside of the terminals. Rock the controls quickly back and forth.



                      On some pots with smaller plastic shafts (some Marshall, Crate, Peavey) be careful the cleaner used does not damage plastic. Reason being is some cleaners can melt away where the internal wiper (variable part of the control) is press fitted into the pot's shaft. If that happens, you will be buying new pots.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Are you having problems? I've found that amps with the pots and jacks mounted to the circuit board (most amps for several decades) have problems with cracked solder joints and need to be reflowed. It causes problems similar to dirty pots and jacks. I.E. random cutting out and volume fluctuations. Also hissing and popping in some cases.
                        <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;I used my psychic powers to investigate this and found it to be hogwash. I hate it when people make claims with no basis in science.&quot;<br />
                        <br />
                        &quot;If a problem is too difficult to understand the solution is to placate your ignorance with denial.&quot;<br />
                        <br />
                        <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/wave.gif" border="0" alt="" title="wave" class="inlineimg" /> <a href="http://soundcloud.com/fly135/sets/tasty-licks" target="_blank"><font size="4"><font face="Verdana"><font color="sienna">Tasty Licks</font></font></font></a> <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/wave.gif" border="0" alt="" title="wave" class="inlineimg" /><br />
                        <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/wave.gif" border="0" alt="" title="wave" class="inlineimg" /> <a href="http://soundcloud.com/fly135/sets/secret-moment" target="_blank"><font size="4"><font face="Verdana"><font color="purple">Secret Moment</font></font></font></a> <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/wave.gif" border="0" alt="" title="wave" class="inlineimg" /></div>

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Are you having problems? I've found that amps with the pots and jacks mounted to the circuit board (most amps for several decades) have problems with cracked solder joints and need to be reflowed. It causes problems similar to dirty pots and jacks. I.E. random cutting out and volume fluctuations. Also hissing and popping in some cases.
                          <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;I used my psychic powers to investigate this and found it to be hogwash. I hate it when people make claims with no basis in science.&quot;<br />
                          <br />
                          &quot;If a problem is too difficult to understand the solution is to placate your ignorance with denial.&quot;<br />
                          <br />
                          <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/wave.gif" border="0" alt="" title="wave" class="inlineimg" /> <a href="http://soundcloud.com/fly135/sets/tasty-licks" target="_blank"><font size="4"><font face="Verdana"><font color="sienna">Tasty Licks</font></font></font></a> <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/wave.gif" border="0" alt="" title="wave" class="inlineimg" /><br />
                          <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/wave.gif" border="0" alt="" title="wave" class="inlineimg" /> <a href="http://soundcloud.com/fly135/sets/secret-moment" target="_blank"><font size="4"><font face="Verdana"><font color="purple">Secret Moment</font></font></font></a> <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/wave.gif" border="0" alt="" title="wave" class="inlineimg" /></div>

                          Comment


                          • #14






                            Quote Originally Posted by HKSblade1
                            View Post

                            For the jacks roll up a piece of super fine sandpaper or emery cloth. Start with about a 3"x4" square and roll it up. Put that in the jacks and spin it around clockwise. This will really remove any oxidation rust contaminants.



                            If you have the plastic Cliff or Rean type shorting jacks try this. First, get an ohm meter and check the continuity across each side of the jacks pins (side to side, not front to back) . With no phono plug inserted you should read a short or close to zero ohms across each set of pins (2 for mono jacks, 3 for stereo jacks). If you read 20 ohms of higher you need to burnish those contact points or replace the jack.



                            To repair these plastic style jacks:

                            Fold a small piece of emery paper or super fine sandpaper into a thin flat burnishing tool. Fold the paper flat just under the width of the jack shorting plug spacing (about 1/8"). Insert a phono jack or small thin screwdriver until you see the shorting lug lift. Insert the flattened sandpaper into that contact point. Pull the jack or screwdriver out which will clamp down on the sandpaper. Now slide the paper in and out. This is the best way to clean these type jacks without replacing them. When finished, check the resistance again (continuity) and look for the zero ohms or close to it reading across the shorting pins.



                            Since these PC mounted jacks often have stress fractures in the solder, be sure to check or simply resolder those pins on the board if needed. I usually just resolder them anyway to improve the integrity of that jacks connection.



                            Get some canned air or compressor and clean any debris from jacks, pots etc. Then spray your contact cleaner in the pots lubrication holes (small hole on the top of the pot casing) or from the underside of the terminals. Rock the controls quickly back and forth.



                            On some pots with smaller plastic shafts (some Marshall, Crate, Peavey) be careful the cleaner used does not damage plastic. Reason being is some cleaners can melt away where the internal wiper (variable part of the control) is press fitted into the pot's shaft. If that happens, you will be buying new pots.










                            Quote Originally Posted by fly135
                            View Post

                            Are you having problems? I've found that amps with the pots and jacks mounted to the circuit board (most amps for several decades) have problems with cracked solder joints and need to be reflowed. It causes problems similar to dirty pots and jacks. I.E. random cutting out and volume fluctuations. Also hissing and popping in some cases.




                            duly noted
                            <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="2"><div align="center">Ibanez JS-1000 / Ibanez RG3-120</div><div align="center">535Q &gt; Keeley Compressor &gt; Xotic Custom Shop BB Preamp &gt; Hartman Flanger</div><div align="center">Laney VH100R <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/cool.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Cool" class="inlineimg" /> / Laney GH50L <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/evil.gif" border="0" alt="" title="evil" class="inlineimg" /></div><div align="center">(MXR 10-band EQ &gt; Line 6 DL-4)</div><div align="center">Geezer Sound Co. 2x12 (80w ceramic WGS BL-80)</div><br />
                            Also own: 1966 Fender Pro Reverb with Weber Californias, Dano CTO-1, Keeley SD-1, EHX D.EM <br />
                            <br />
                            <font size="1">Yes that's my girlfriend.</font></font></div>

                            Comment


                            • #15






                              Quote Originally Posted by HKSblade1
                              View Post

                              For the jacks roll up a piece of super fine sandpaper or emery cloth. Start with about a 3"x4" square and roll it up. Put that in the jacks and spin it around clockwise. This will really remove any oxidation rust contaminants.



                              If you have the plastic Cliff or Rean type shorting jacks try this. First, get an ohm meter and check the continuity across each side of the jacks pins (side to side, not front to back) . With no phono plug inserted you should read a short or close to zero ohms across each set of pins (2 for mono jacks, 3 for stereo jacks). If you read 20 ohms of higher you need to burnish those contact points or replace the jack.



                              To repair these plastic style jacks:

                              Fold a small piece of emery paper or super fine sandpaper into a thin flat burnishing tool. Fold the paper flat just under the width of the jack shorting plug spacing (about 1/8"). Insert a phono jack or small thin screwdriver until you see the shorting lug lift. Insert the flattened sandpaper into that contact point. Pull the jack or screwdriver out which will clamp down on the sandpaper. Now slide the paper in and out. This is the best way to clean these type jacks without replacing them. When finished, check the resistance again (continuity) and look for the zero ohms or close to it reading across the shorting pins.



                              Since these PC mounted jacks often have stress fractures in the solder, be sure to check or simply resolder those pins on the board if needed. I usually just resolder them anyway to improve the integrity of that jacks connection.



                              Get some canned air or compressor and clean any debris from jacks, pots etc. Then spray your contact cleaner in the pots lubrication holes (small hole on the top of the pot casing) or from the underside of the terminals. Rock the controls quickly back and forth.



                              On some pots with smaller plastic shafts (some Marshall, Crate, Peavey) be careful the cleaner used does not damage plastic. Reason being is some cleaners can melt away where the internal wiper (variable part of the control) is press fitted into the pot's shaft. If that happens, you will be buying new pots.










                              Quote Originally Posted by fly135
                              View Post

                              Are you having problems? I've found that amps with the pots and jacks mounted to the circuit board (most amps for several decades) have problems with cracked solder joints and need to be reflowed. It causes problems similar to dirty pots and jacks. I.E. random cutting out and volume fluctuations. Also hissing and popping in some cases.




                              duly noted
                              <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="2"><div align="center">Ibanez JS-1000 / Ibanez RG3-120</div><div align="center">535Q &gt; Keeley Compressor &gt; Xotic Custom Shop BB Preamp &gt; Hartman Flanger</div><div align="center">Laney VH100R <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/cool.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Cool" class="inlineimg" /> / Laney GH50L <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/evil.gif" border="0" alt="" title="evil" class="inlineimg" /></div><div align="center">(MXR 10-band EQ &gt; Line 6 DL-4)</div><div align="center">Geezer Sound Co. 2x12 (80w ceramic WGS BL-80)</div><br />
                              Also own: 1966 Fender Pro Reverb with Weber Californias, Dano CTO-1, Keeley SD-1, EHX D.EM <br />
                              <br />
                              <font size="1">Yes that's my girlfriend.</font></font></div>

                              Comment



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