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what does a sonic maximizer do?

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  • #61
    Not at all.
    How many guitarists does it take to screw in a lightbulb ? Five , one to screw it in , hit the switch and four to sit around bragging how much better they could have done it !!!! 😱👹😲

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    • #62
      I also used one in a band situation and thought it was incredibly useful. I used it with a Marshall 3203, which has only a single 'Tone' knob on the gain channel. So this was a simple and very effective way to shape my sound (I'm sure a 6 band would've done just as well). And no, it didn't muddy things up.. quite the opposite, I used it to help me cut through. Just roll down the bass, obviously.

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      • #63
        If you know what you're doing, they're a nice tool.

        Moderation is the key.

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        • #64

          The principle function of the BBE Sonic Maximiser circuit is to basically phase align (or realign) audio frequency bands in relation to the other frequency bands.


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          • #65
            I used to own one and I am thinking of buying another.I don't know if I want stomp-box or rack-mount though.
            He has escaped! Youtube , ​Murika , France

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            • #66
              I apologize for being the new member to continue the zombie thread from years ago, but I couldn't stop myself from chiming in after seeing that there were more recent responses, and that the "factoids" stated about the thing continue:

              First and foremost, this claim over and over about putting different frequency signals in phase with each other is nonsensical. Phase is a position in a cycle. "In phase" means that two periodic functions, at a given time, match. If two different periodic functions have different frequencies, the positions in their cycles will only match once in time, regardless of what you do to them or don't do to them, short of shifting the actual frequency of one wave to match the other. For example, if I eat three times a day, eight hours apart, and you eat three times a day, eight hours apart, our meals are in phase with each other if we eat at the same time. If I change my habits such that I eat meals every eight and a half hours, and you continue to eat every eight hours, we cannot always eat at the same time, right?

              Anyway, looking at the circuitry of the sonic maximizer, it does not seem as though there is anything inside of it that would have any adjustable or deliberate effect on phase.

              The circuit is essentially a novel way to make a 3-band EQ. I really think that where ever a 3 band EQ can be used, you can substitute a sonic maximizer instead. It behaves differently than a standard EQ, and also lacks a standard mid level adjustment, but one could argue that the overall difference is subtle.

              I had not realized there was so much hate for the device. Perhaps because there is misinformation abounding about what to expect from it. It's a nifty gadget for a PA system, and it can be used effectively in an effects loop for guitar or bass. I've honestly never tried one on drums, but, having a good base understanding of what it is and how it works, I have a pretty high level of confidence that it won't do anything more or less for drums than what it does in general.

              TL;DR - The sonic maximizer is a basically your "high," and "low" amplifier knobs with a twist. Whether the twist is significant or not seems to be debate-able, but the device does not perform black magic on your sound (although it might add a touch of snake oil).

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              • #67
                Originally posted by Sound on Sound View Post
                The phase manipulation side of the process is described as a linear phase shift across the whole audio spectrum corresponding to a delay of under 2ms. This is intended to prevent the high frequency detail from being smeared by the low frequency components of the sound and increases definition without boosting level.
                This is what has been sold since day one. Maybe you can work for BBE as a consultant.
                Here's the rest of the article:
                http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/1994...maximiser.html


                Originally posted by bostjan View Post
                I apologize for being the new member to continue the zombie thread from years ago, but I couldn't stop myself from chiming in after seeing that there were more recent responses, and that the "factoids" stated about the thing continue:

                First and foremost, this claim over and over about putting different frequency signals in phase with each other is nonsensical. Phase is a position in a cycle. "In phase" means that two periodic functions, at a given time, match. If two different periodic functions have different frequencies, the positions in their cycles will only match once in time, regardless of what you do to them or don't do to them, short of shifting the actual frequency of one wave to match the other. For example, if I eat three times a day, eight hours apart, and you eat three times a day, eight hours apart, our meals are in phase with each other if we eat at the same time. If I change my habits such that I eat meals every eight and a half hours, and you continue to eat every eight hours, we cannot always eat at the same time, right?

                Anyway, looking at the circuitry of the sonic maximizer, it does not seem as though there is anything inside of it that would have any adjustable or deliberate effect on phase.

                The circuit is essentially a novel way to make a 3-band EQ. I really think that where ever a 3 band EQ can be used, you can substitute a sonic maximizer instead. It behaves differently than a standard EQ, and also lacks a standard mid level adjustment, but one could argue that the overall difference is subtle.

                I had not realized there was so much hate for the device. Perhaps because there is misinformation abounding about what to expect from it. It's a nifty gadget for a PA system, and it can be used effectively in an effects loop for guitar or bass. I've honestly never tried one on drums, but, having a good base understanding of what it is and how it works, I have a pretty high level of confidence that it won't do anything more or less for drums than what it does in general.

                TL;DR - The sonic maximizer is a basically your "high," and "low" amplifier knobs with a twist. Whether the twist is significant or not seems to be debate-able, but the device does not perform black magic on your sound (although it might add a touch of snake oil).
                Originally posted by Unconfigured Static HTML Widget...








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                • #68
                  Originally posted by dmk View Post
                  http://www.bbesound.com/technologies/BBE%5FHDS/



                  in reality, the 'phase realignment' of frequencies isnt really noticible. all you're really hearing is the bass boost and presence enhancement. the result being that you loose all the midrange from your sound. unfortunatly this is where most of the guitar sound is.

                  bit of a waste on guitar (imo) though lots of people do use them and used very sparingly they can help to brighten a dull amp or add some low end clout.

                  they do sound good for adding a bit of polish to final mixes though. again, moderation been the key.
                  I put my digital parametric EQ after my BBE sonic maximizer, location/ placement of the sonic maximizer is the key.
                  That way if I need a Thrash ( scooped mids ) my patch in the digital parametric EQ will give me that sound. If I need a Classic Rock / Hard Rock 60's, 70's, 80's Metal / Neo Classical or Blues sound .... the parametric EQ will fill in the missing mids need for the genre of music I am playing.
                  I love my sonic maximizer. 😃
                  Last edited by AJ6stringsting; 07-01-2016, 06:39 PM.
                  How many guitarists does it take to screw in a lightbulb ? Five , one to screw it in , hit the switch and four to sit around bragging how much better they could have done it !!!! 😱👹😲

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                  • #69
                    You have to have a good understanding of electronics and music to understand what the unit does for music.

                    A system which corrects for adverse characteristics such as reactance, inertia and resonances of a power amplifier driven load such as a speaker or multiple speaker system. Program voltage is applied to a reference load which has electrical characteristics that simulate characteristics of the driven load, and the response of the reference load to the program is used to develop a correction voltage signal for the driven load. The program and the correction voltage signal are simultaneously applied to the power amplifier to simultaneously reproduce the program and correct for the adverse characteristics of the load.

                    Most sounds that are produced by musical instruments have a sharp attack that is characterized by a sharply rising initial transient wave front in each fundamental frequency cycle, this initial transient containing most of the high frequency harmonic content of the sound. It has been found that for the human ear to hear the entire spectrum of such sounds, it must receive these initial high frequency harmonic sounds first, followed then by the midrange and low end frequencies. However, the additive or cumulative effects of speaker inductive reactance and inertia in current state-of-the-art amplifier/speaker systems cause the rise time to be so slow and the phase lag to be so large at higher frequencies that the sharply rising wave fronts or initial transients which contain most of the high frequency harmonics become masked to a large extent by the lower, heavier frequencies. Such masking of the high frequency harmonics is commonly referred to as "transient distortion", and causes the acoustic output of the system to sound "artificial" or "recorded", instead of sounding completely "live" or "natural" as when the ear properly receives the sharply rising initial transient wave front in its proper order ahead of the lower frequencies.

                    Another object of the invention is to provide an amplifier load correction system which is capable of so completely overcoming the usual phase lagging characteristics of a speaker which increase from the nominal or rated 400 Hz frequency all of the way out to 20 KHz caused by both inductive reactance and inertia, that for the first time in the art the speaker load current phase can be held substantially completely "in phase", and even slightly leading in phase, from 400 Hz all of the way out to 20 KHz, while simultaneously the rise time can be kept below about 10 microseconds in all forms of the invention

                    In summary, BBE will delay lower frequencies so the high frequency transients hit your ears first and your non-time-aligned system will sound "better", (though still not time aligned). It does all of this using simple negative feedback loops using caps and coils to delay the lower frequencies and allow the higher frequencies through without the lower frequency transients masking them. This phase alignment is not very large. I doubt it would be more then a millisecond but its enough to help overcome natural issues involving reactance and reluctance which develop in simple passive crossovers used to separate driver frequencies.

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                    • #70
                      I have one of the original two channel units. I used it on a Yamaha synth rack. Stuff works. Made dull 4 operator FM sparkle.
                      Originally posted by Unconfigured Static HTML Widget...








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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by Tubefox View Post
                        PROTIP: Don't buy the $79 sonic maximizer pedal.<BR />
                        <BR />
                        A guy I know has one of the expensive, rackmount ones. Try one of these, and run it into your effects loop. It sounds amazing.<BR />
                        <BR />
                        Also it is meant for us thrash metal people - I screwed with the abovementioned sonic maximizer for about thirty seconds and got a totally insane tone. I was using a metal zone, and it basically stuck all the bass back in the metal zone had sucked out.<BR />
                        <BR />
                        Of course, then I was so happy it didn't sound like trebley crap that I cranked the gain way too high and had to rerecord it later.
                        If you add a buffer , as the first thing your guitar signal into ( lowers the impedance from high to low ) * and another buffer going from the Multi Effects / Analog Pedals , that way you can restore dynamics / impedance issues that pop on your pedalboard.


                        * Great on all passive pickups, but could make EMG pickups sound anemic / too thin.
                        I replaced my EMG 81 / 85 set on 1971 Gibson Flying V, with some Schaller active pickups and the sound has passive pickup dynamics now ..... And the Sonic Maximizer will give you studio quality , live on a stage.
                        Last edited by AJ6stringsting; 04-09-2018, 01:34 AM.
                        How many guitarists does it take to screw in a lightbulb ? Five , one to screw it in , hit the switch and four to sit around bragging how much better they could have done it !!!! 😱👹😲

                        Comment

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