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Optimum FX in wedges

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  • Optimum FX in wedges

    Assuming a client insists on FX in the wedges, can the possibility of feedback issues be lessened by the parameters set in the FX? For example, by increasing or decreasing the parameters of a reverb program, would it make a difference ?

  • #2
    They are going to want a particular verb sound so you are pretty much stuck but "less is more" applies to verb in monitors.

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    • #3
      I've found that often (of course not always) all people are looking for is something to take that close, direct, dry sound away. Unless instructed otherwise, start with a short (1.4 sec decay time) and see if it makes them happy. Shorter is in effect (pun intended) less reverb and will usually cause you less feedback issues.
      J.R. Previously jrble

      See my Dog Of The Hair studio at: http://www.dogoth.com/studio/

      Quote from someone: Flat response? Get out the jack and change the tire.
      If you think "power is knowledge", you have it backwards.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Tomm Williams View Post
        Assuming a client insists on FX in the wedges, can the possibility of feedback issues be lessened by the parameters set in the FX? For example, by increasing or decreasing the parameters of a reverb program, would it make a difference ?
        Only as that parameter change affects the gain
        Don Boomer

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        • #5
          pick a reverb that is not overly bright if using pre-sets

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          • #6
            I have never found reverb in the wedges to be the big feedback problem that many talk about. I have found that, fortunately, it's usually the quieter type bands that ask for it, especially Jazz singers. Most of the louder, rock style bands don't care about reverb unless they are using in ears.

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            • #7
              We had a related thread back in March :

              http://www.harmonycentral.com/forum/...itors-strategy

              That was not so much about preventing feedback but some of the ideas could possibly help. When you add efx, as Don points out, you are adding overall gain. So if a little delay mixed back in will satisfy the singer psychologically and it is less overall gain addition than would be required to get the same satisfaction from a typical reverb, then it works to your advantage with respect to feedback.

              Another thought is if your monitor feedback (if any) is usually in the higher frequencies, you might be able to roll off the efx return below that frequency.
              --Mike<br><b>&quot;</b><i>If your not confused, you don't know what is going on</i><b>!&quot;</b><br><br>Live Sound for the Mt. Shasta area<br><a href="http://www.shastalivesound.com">ShastaLiveSound.com</a><br>

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