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Would you use the New Rhodes Mark VII as a midi controller for Live And studio?

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  • #16
    Are the sounds tonal or just mechanical clicks and hits? I hope it's the latter at the very least, otherwise I personally would be annoyed to use it as a MIDI controller.
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    • #17
      The MK VII seems to be pretty much the Ultimate Pinnacle of Rhodes Freakdom,
      the kind of axe that one builds their (keyboard) life around.

      To this kind of player,
      the MIDI capabilities of this instrument are wa-a-a-y down their list of joys and concerns .

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      • #18
        Really, when it's unplugged you can barely hear it. It's quieter than, say, headphones laying behind it. I played one at Sweetwater a few weeks ago. I don't remember ever trying an old Rhodes unplugged, so I don't know if it's different or not. And yeah, Wurlies can be easily be heard without power.
        ComputerMusicGuide.com

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        • #19
          Is it the hammers' striking action that can be heard starting at 4:49 to 4:55? They can be heard upon keys release too at 4:35.

          Anyway, you can clearly hear a clicking sound. Wear your headphones.

          <div class="signaturecontainer"><i>Shoemakers wear the worst shoes</i>.<br />
          <i>You left your ISO on Auto. That's a no-no</i>.<br />
          Click <a href="http://www.google.com/cse/home?cx=011563589415423471302gwq2v3by04" target="_blank">here</a> to search HC forums.<br />
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          • #20
            ... but doesn't a Rhodes generate an actual sound without amplification?



            Actually that was my poin it. I know atleast the old ones make a lot of noise without a amp.
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            • #21
              Coincidentally, I played a beat up old 1976 Rhodes suitcase today. With the volume all the way down, I could barely hear any tones, about the same as the Mk 7. The key mechanism made much more noise than the tines.
              ComputerMusicGuide.com

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              • #22
                I remember playing a wurlie and a i think a rhodes also with out any power , and i could
                hear it perfectly clear.
                <div class="signaturecontainer">Guess what? ! I have a Fever and the prescription is more cowbell !<br />
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                Moog Modular,B3 leslie,gran piano, GX1 <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/boring.gif" border="0" alt="" title="boring" class="inlineimg" /></div>

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                • #23
                  Maybe not perfectly clear, but you can hear the sound of the tines or reeds underneath all the clicking and clacking of the keys. Same with electro-acoustic pianos like the CP-70 and EP-608. If there are real hammers inside striking tone sources as full velocity, you'll hear it. But not well. Alone in the dead of night, sure. During the day, with the washing machine going and 2 kids jumping around upstairs while the dogs are barking? No.
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                  • #24
                    LOL. The acoustical sound of Rhodes is extremely low... it was really a surprise when I tried to listen the acoustic sound without amplification and I could barely hear it at all, even with the open tonebars after the top taken away. Trying to mic the acoustic sound is really out of the question, unless you like to listen all the key mechanic sounds (the hitting key action makes a lot of noise). I also own Yamaha CP-60M electric upright and it's totally different thing when compared to acoustics of the Rhodes. As being told about Rhodes before, if you listen without any amplification, the key mechanics are making more sounds than the tines itself, but of course when amplified, the sound is very clear and distinct, but the key mechanics are not really making any significant part of the sound, or that was my impression when I was playing my Rhodes (Mark 1, 1979). In Electric grands, like the Yamaha CP-series they are using piezos which are much more sensitive for any vibration so it amplifies every noise of the all mechanics as well, but Rhodes uses magnetic pickups which are not that sensible for mechanic noises at all since it's pointed into the tines.
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                    • #25
                      A Rhodes has no internal speaker. You have to plug it into an amp to get the Rhodes sound. You don't have to plug something into a jack to silence it, because there's a volume control on the front panel.

                      It does make noise when you play it, about as much as a "silent piano" if you've even played one of those. More thumping/clacking than tine noise per se. More noise than a turned-off digital piano, less than an unplugged CP70 electric grand (by a wide margin). Is it loud enough to bother you? That depends on how sensitive you are to noise. It wouldn't bother me, playing with headphones or speakers at home practice levels.

                      I bet the Mark VII is louder than the original thanks to the fiberglass case rather than a wood case, but probably still a lot quieter than the CP70. The mechanism is nearly identical -- tines are interchangeable, hammers strike them the same way, etc., so they'd make the same kind of noise unplugged. It still wouldn't be enough to bother me.

                      Regardless, I wouldn't want a Rhodes for my main controller, because the action doesn't feel like a piano. I've played Rhodes steadily since I got mine in 1978 (and am in the process of refurbishing). The Mark VII has an improved action, but still feels more like a Rhodes than an acoustic piano. A good digital piano action will be faster and dynamically more responsive (for most players) than a Rhodes keyboard using MIDI.

                      The reason to get a Rhodes is because you want a Rhodes. If you also use it as a controller, cool. I know I'd enjoy layering other sounds with Rhodes. However, these days when I do that, I use a digital piano keyboard and my Rhodes soundfont. Sure, not the same as the real thing, but I'd rather play a piano+rhodes patch with a piano keyboard than a Rhodes keyboard. Also, while the Rhodes soundfont is inferior to the real thing in many ways, it's also superior in many ways (less noise, stereo image carefully built into the samples, compression added to samples for artistic reasons, etc.) When I sampled mine, I had a list of the problems I'd faced over the decades, and addressed them. The biggest disadvantage is I should have sampled more velocity layers, and I plan to do that soon. Plus I goofed up the top velocity layer at the bottom end of the keyboard. The reason for that is complicated but I hope to solve it next go around.
                      learjeff.net

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                      • #26
                        Guys how old are you ? hearing ok? ?

                        I was amazed at the amount of noise my wurlie made without any amp soo much that i almost never pluged it.
                        <div class="signaturecontainer">Guess what? ! I have a Fever and the prescription is more cowbell !<br />
                        <br />
                        <br />
                        Moog Modular,B3 leslie,gran piano, GX1 <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/boring.gif" border="0" alt="" title="boring" class="inlineimg" /></div>

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