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  • #16
    Thanks much Outkaster!

    I'll dig around and try to come up with some tunes. I'm fairly sure I know the sound you're talking about, and it is exactly what I'm after. I'm currently in Boulder, Colorado and a friend of mine said she is working with Al Laughlin, the old keyboardist for the Samples. I may have to try and get a couple of lessons out of him! This may be sacrelige to the Roots devotees here (I hope not), but would the organ work on the Samples' "When it's Raining" be a fair example of bubbling?

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B000001HZ6/qid=1113332268/sr=2-3/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_3/104-9005370-5187141

    Comment


    • #17
      Actually no ok but try to go for the root music and where it started. It is like listening to Stevie Ray Vaughn to understand blues see what I mean? Go to internet and pick up Talkin Blues by the Wailers or Burning. You can get those albums on E-bay and Half.com. Here are better examples of bubbling. Let me know how you make out.

      "Put it On" from the Wailers

      http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0002Y9T6U/qid=1113335346/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-0713696-7149723

      A Marley Song "Crazy Baldheads":

      http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00007E7H5/qid=1113335492/sr=1-20/ref=sr_1_20/102-0713696-7149723?v=glance&s=music

      "Roller Skates" by Steel Pulse

      http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B000002HBN/qid=1113335624/sr=2-2/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_2/102-0713696-7149723
      <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello&quot;</div>

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Outkaster
        Unless it is a big mixed band like UB40 you do not get the respect from the crowd. Sorry it is too bad but that is how it is.


        so are you trying to say that all white reggae is hippie ****************?

        it's not. i'm not a hippie, but i am white. my reggae doesn't suck. therefore, there is some white reggae which is neither bad nor made by hippies.

        in fact, the only people i see who give a **************** about the torch of traditional ska and rocksteady are white people ... and it's not a colour thing. i see plenty of blacks at good white ska gigs. maybe new york is different but chicago and st louis don't care.

        Playing dub has to be instinctual and sorry for a lot of people it is not.


        true dat.

        with dub it can help to come from an ambient background or (believe it or not) slowcore death metal.

        i have heard some _really_ good dub made by death metal guys. Solaris i believe was the name of the project.
        <div class="signaturecontainer">main: <a href="http://suitandtieguy.com" target="_blank">http://suitandtieguy.com</a><br />
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        my digital albums: <a href="http://suitandtieguy.bandcamp.com" target="_blank">http://suitandtieguy.bandcamp.com</a></div>

        Comment


        • #19
          "so are you trying to say that all white reggae is hippie ****************?

          it's not. i'm not a hippie, but i am white. my reggae doesn't suck. therefore, there is some white reggae which is neither bad nor made by hippies."

          I remember a great band of suburban white boys who played around Kansas City and Lawrence, KS during my college years- Pat's Blue Riddim Band. They were a big hit at the Jamacian Sunsplash festival one year. Here is an article from the local freebie alternative press ("The Pitch") from 2002 that I found:

          Originally published by The Pitch Aug 29, 2002
          C2002 New Times, Inc. All rights reserved.

          Riddim Nation
          Blue Riddim gets back into the groove.
          By Mike Warren


          Twenty-three years ago, Bob Marley played Hoch Auditorium at the
          University of Kansas. Local fans knew and loved Marley's music, but
          their regular exposure to roots-reggae came from the opening act, Pat's
          Blue Riddim Band, and that group's frequent visits to KC's Parody Hall
          and Lawrence's Off the Wall Hall. Kansas City's PBR, as it was, and
          frequently still is, affectionately known, held its own with the king of
          reggae that night.
          "We were the first guys down the pike -- we had that opportunity,"
          longtime Blue Riddim drummer Steve "Duck" McLane says, warm memories
          audible in his voice. "What was really cool [in our career] was having a
          chance to open for Bob Marley, Sly and Robbie, and Black Uhuru. Every
          night we'd get clobbered by them, but we'd climb up another notch. It
          was a real chop-builder."


          In its earliest incarnations, PBR consisted of friends who graduated
          from Shawnee Mission East in '67 and '68. "We were born out of that
          late-'60s Kansas City scene -- the Vanguard, the Aquarius -- places
          where people were hanging out," McLane says. "We'd all played jazz and
          R&B together, in all different kinds of aggregations." McLane, who
          started hearing reggae when he played in New York and south Florida in
          the early '70s, immediately knew it was something he wanted to do.


          "I came back to KC and said, 'We really ought to try to play some reggae
          music,'" McLane explains. "It was big-time dance music, and we all love
          dance music, so we started experimenting. By '74, we had something that
          was workable, a band called Rhythm Funkshun. That band, basically a
          rhythm section version of what became PBR, broke up because it was a
          little bit ahead of its time.


          "About a year and a half later, we started PBR," McLane continues. "We
          were playing 10 percent ska, 10 percent calypso, maybe 25 percent
          straight-up R&B, and the rest of it would be reggae. People were just
          everywhere, on top of each other, dancing."


          During the early '80s, PBR toured nonstop, burning through two vans and
          42 of 50 states. "We just had our nose to the grindstone and never
          stopped," McLane says. "We really should have taken more time out to
          record, but it was 'dollar a day, give us what you can' and keep moving.
          When it got to the point where we could actually play it good, we made a
          record [1981's Restless Spirit]."


          PBR made several trips to Jamaica, where it learned from the genre's
          best practitioners. "Jamaican musicians are really approachable, and
          we'd hang out with them -- a cultural exchange," McLane explains.
          Equally accessible were Jamaican DJs. "When I flew down there in late
          '81, I brought a box of 25 records, and I thought, What the hell. I'll
          drive them up to [Kingston radio stations] RJR and JBC. While I was
          driving to JBC, I heard the song come over RJR -- and I just about drove
          off the road. I thought, I'm driving around Jamaica, and I'm hearing my
          own music on the radio!"


          Six months later, Blue Riddim became the first American band to play
          Sunsplash in Jamaica. "We were voted co-'Best Band' of the entire
          festival," McLane says. "It blew me away that we blew them away. I was
          expecting pineapples and cantaloupes thrown at us. We're playing these
          old songs, and we're also from America, and we're also white. It's five
          o'clock in the morning, and they're going, 'What in the ... ?'


          "The lyrics from the very first song, "Smile," are It's best to arrive
          with a smile on your face, and just at that moment, the sun was creaking
          up over the mountain and shining down onto the field," McLane recalls.
          "People are getting the sun in their eyes right as they hear these
          lyrics, and they started screaming and bawling and jumping up and down.
          All of a sudden you had 20,000 people jumping up and down." That
          performance, released in 1984 as Alive in Jamaica, earned the band a
          Grammy nomination.


          Twenty years later, the Blue Riddim Band returns home for an encore.
          Longstanding veterans, including Scott Korchak (vocals, brass), Jack
          Lightfoot (trumpet), Jeff Porter (vocals, guitar), Jack Blackett (tenor
          sax), Joe Miquelon (keyboards) and Todd "Bebop" Byrd (bass) will be
          joined by folks such as Stephanie Cox (trombonist for the Loose Cannon
          Brass Band -- still another of PBR's permutations). Says McLane, "It's
          like any band that's been around for this long -- whoever's left
          standing who wants to show up can play.


          "We lost Bob Zohn, a great singer and songwriter from Florida who died
          several years back, but basically the core of the band exists here in
          good ol' Kansas City," McLane explains. "It's great, because a lot of
          SDI [Strategic Dance Initiative] alums have come into the Blue Riddim
          fold, and we all play together. For this particular show, we'll have a
          taste of SDI, a taste of New Riddim [a more recent dancehall version of
          the band], older Blue Riddim, newer Blue Riddim -- whatever we're
          serving up at that particular time." For old fans -- and new -- it's a
          chance to get reacquainted with a band that made the Caribbean feel as
          if it were just next door.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by misterdregs
            Here is an article from the local freebie alternative press ("The Pitch") from 2002 that I found:


            that's a cool article. thanks for the intel.

            i remember when i was stranded in Kansas City i met a dub bass player named Josh Powers.

            here's a review of one of his mix CDs ... also from The Pitch: http://pitch.com/issues/2003-12-11/hearnow3.html

            that guy was cool as ****************. he gave me a bitchin' tape that was unfortunately stolen from me by a crackhead with a brick.

            unrelated to reggae but not unrelated to black music: i also saw Everette DeVan twice while i was there. he's a mother****************er. KC is lucky to have an organist of that calibre.

            i also remember a really good acid jazz DJ spinning in the beergarden of one of the bars in what i think was the westport area. i'm pretty sure it was near the Grand Emporium ... i could be wrong though.
            <div class="signaturecontainer">main: <a href="http://suitandtieguy.com" target="_blank">http://suitandtieguy.com</a><br />
            Lawrence Miles style rants: <a href="http://suitandtieguy.livejournal.com" target="_blank">http://suitandtieguy.livejournal.com</a><br />
            handbuilt boutique synthesiser modules: <a href="http://stgsoundlabs.com" target="_blank">http://stgsoundlabs.com</a><br />
            my digital albums: <a href="http://suitandtieguy.bandcamp.com" target="_blank">http://suitandtieguy.bandcamp.com</a></div>

            Comment


            • #21
              it's not. i'm not a hippie, but i am white. my reggae doesn't suck. therefore, there is some white reggae which is neither bad nor made by hippies

              Well sorry to tell you but know a strictly Caribbean crowd, especially Jamaican, will give not props to a band that does not play the music right. Try it and see a bunch of blank faces staring at you like what the hell are you doing. I have experienced it seen it more than once, and heard others talk about it in the audience. If a band sound's traditional or play's right that is one thing but I will tell you what most of the time it is not that way. Playing Reggae is not just like playing blues or something. You have to immerse yourself in the culture. It is about the food, politics, music, the people and everything else. It is not just about trying to learn to play from a couple Marley records and smoking some weed. I listend to your sound clip and it was not even close. You can call it Reggae but it is not. I am not trying to be mean but I have been involved with the music for a lot of years.

              Sorry race plays a part but it is how things are sometimes. I was talking to some of the guy's in the band about this. This is cultural music and is heavily immersed in Jamaican history and the struggles of black people. Reggae that is popular now is Cappleton, Beenie Man, Sizzla, Lady Saw, Vegas, Luciano, and a host of others. True it is not politcal-social lyrics now but it is the music now of their streets. You hear it alot in the Bronx and parts of NYC.

              The old stand-by's like Judy Mowatt, Sugar Minot, Everton Blender, The Mighty-Diamonds, Burning Spear, Beres Hammond, Marcia Griffiths, Steel Pulse, Inner Circle and Third World will always have their place. I'm sorry to rant but this is something I know about. I listen to it, play it, practice it and most of all live it. You can play what you want but people should not give advice unless they know what they are talking about. I am not saying it is the case here but there is a lot of bad advice on this forum already.
              <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello&quot;</div>

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Outkaster
                Playing Reggae is not just like playing blues or something. ... It is not just about trying to learn to play from a couple Marley records and smoking some weed. I listend to your sound clip and it was not even close.


                dude. that's awesome.

                you're totally getting quoted in my press pack.

                alongside ...

                "Worst 300 dollars I ever spent" - JD Comfort, Jim's Steakhouse

                "... Evokes moods ..." - Clarence Moore, Peoria Journal Star

                "Eat this, ambient bitch!" - Tim Beck, Beck's Boss Sound Studio


                man ... i really didn't post that to get your approval. personally, i don't care what purist musicians think about my music. i'm a fusion artist.

                i'm too beaty for ambient, too spacey for jazz, not a good enough singer, i lack the chops of my idols, and i'm too punk for punk rock.

                but i would at least like you to acknowledge three things:

                a) that i do not approach live ambient dub reggae from a pot-smoking bead-wearing hemp-sholaced hippie perspective, and i make no claims to rastafarism nor do i smoke wisdom weed.

                b) that you did not recognise the melody of that tune, and that you did not find the humour in the naming of the tune.

                c) that while my dub bass is not good enough for you, my drummer cannot handle jamaican music, and that the textures of the guitarist and i did not find spiritual resonance with you, that i do care more about trying to be honest about playing that music than Eric Clapton ever was.

                d) that i was the first person in this thread to put their ass on the line and point to an mp3 of their own playing for these people who have apparently opened for everyone from Black Uhuru to the Skatellites to Bob Marley himself. the only name dropping i'll do is "i had a very long chat about fountain pens with the saxophonist from The Articles. oh ... i also ran sound for Skapone once. they sucked."

                i would love to send you all of my reggae variant tunes and have you rip them apart. you claim to know what you're talking about and feel passionately about it and i can respect that.

                man ... i really think we'd get along great in person. i'm not here attacking you man. i really think we agree more than disagree.

                btw, if you think playing reggae right is hard ... don't say playing the blues is easy. all you do is further accentuate the unfortunate rift in black music between jamaica and america. it's bad enough trying to get some respect going for reggae beyond old bob from soul musicians without reggae musicians saying the blues is easy.

                do you think Memphis is easy? i really wanna know how you feel about _that_ black music variant.
                <div class="signaturecontainer">main: <a href="http://suitandtieguy.com" target="_blank">http://suitandtieguy.com</a><br />
                Lawrence Miles style rants: <a href="http://suitandtieguy.livejournal.com" target="_blank">http://suitandtieguy.livejournal.com</a><br />
                handbuilt boutique synthesiser modules: <a href="http://stgsoundlabs.com" target="_blank">http://stgsoundlabs.com</a><br />
                my digital albums: <a href="http://suitandtieguy.bandcamp.com" target="_blank">http://suitandtieguy.bandcamp.com</a></div>

                Comment


                • #23
                  This is a very interesting thread and I do have respect for Outkaster's authenticity. I am not worthy...

                  I am definitely not deeply immersed in the culture and never claimed to be, so take my words with somewhat of a grain of salt. I was in a ska/reggae/world beat/pop-ish group for a number of years. We did get the opportunity to play with a number of authentic and less-than-authentic reggae and ska groups. We were mostly a high-energy ska band, but a little more cerebral than a lot of punk-infused ska bands. We learned and played a number of classic reggae covers along the way, intermingled with diverse hybrid music like The Police and English Beat. We were all white guys with a black lead singer. Definitely not a purist traditional reggae band, but certainly influenced by the genre and surprise, surprise...we took it in our own direction. It was closer to the UB40 pop sound with reggae/ska underpinnings...about 75% of the night, I was playing some sort of organ bubble or chopping piano sounds on the offbeat. This may be sacrilege, but one newspaper reviewer said we sounded like "reggae on crack."

                  I have a feeling Outkaster would categorize us as posers, but that's ok. I think there is value in getting a wide variety of opinions on all topics and there are seemingly few people talking about the intricacies of actually playing organ in the reggae idiom. I spent some time in this space and can hopefully provide some help through a slightly different lens.

                  As for MP3s, I enjoyed listening to suitandtieguy's music and I got the tonge-in-cheek thing with the movie theme quote. Nice Hammond sound! Today I do not have MP3s of the band I was in, but it used to be on MP3.com until that went down. I will investigate one of the new sites that allow posting MP3s and try to get up a couple of examples when I have a moment.

                  Regards,
                  Eric
                  <div class="signaturecontainer"><i><font size="1"><font color="dimgray"><b>Originally posted by p120dUdE</b></font></font></i><br />
                  These are family forums, and many young kids come here and read them.<br />
                  <br />
                  I am sure there will be no problems, but if there is, my moderation team will take action.<br />
                  <br />
                  <i><font size="1"><font color="DimGray"><b>Originally posted by ChasIII</b></font></font></i><br />
                  Im so sick of keyboards. All this keyboard stuff people always use. All this keyboard synth talk all the time. I'm done with it. Never again.<br />
                  <br />
                  Im thinking that at some point I will have to stop this and start doing other things. Any thoughts, feelings, or ideas?</div>

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I know you guy's were not looking for approval and I know I was not trying to be harsh and I do not call you guy's posers. Truth is there is no loyalty to music anywhere hardley anymore. There is something to be said for dedicating yourself to a style of music. That also does not mean you cannot like other styles. I had to tell my bass player and drummer last night that they have to love Reggae or it will show on stage if they are going through the motions. They come from R & B funk background and have a hard time with the discipline of it. To play the same thing over and over as a musician is something you have to get used to. Some musicians can not make the transisition because they want to play too many notes. Other Jamaicans, whether they were musicians or not have told me musicians are the hands of god and that we have to be honest with the music. I was not trying to start and argument but Reggae get's no respect because it is more international. People here have Rock, blues, R&B and Gospel. Those music styles are popular in Jamaican but for an island 90 miles wide a great style comes from it.

                    Suitandtieguy we would get along great. You carry a C-2 around Quaterfoil and all, and just that makes me respect you. You like being a fusion artist and that's cool. I guess it is when you would label things as "Reggae" it will raise a flag in people like me. People call Shaggy Reggae and he himself said "no my music is more pop than traditional Reggae music". I saw it in an interview last year. When Marley got inducted into the Rock and Roll hall of Fame a few years ago they play "Could You be Loved" and butchered it. It was really sad. I was watching it with my guitarist and he was like what the **************** is that?

                    Blues and Memphis is hard music because it is based on feel but if you are a good enough musician it is not that hard to get. I am not going to play a Springsteen song like "Janey don't you lose heart" like I would a dub tune. It just means knowing what to put where. Thanks you guys and good luck.
                    <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello&quot;</div>

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Outkaster
                      Actually no ok but try to go for the root music and where it started. It is like listening to Stevie Ray Vaughn to understand blues see what I mean? Go to internet and pick up Talkin Blues by the Wailers or Burning. You can get those albums on E-bay and Half.com. Here are better examples of bubbling. Let me know how you make out.

                      "Put it On" from the Wailers

                      http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0002Y9T6U/qid=1113335346/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-0713696-7149723

                      A Marley Song "Crazy Baldheads":

                      http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00007E7H5/qid=1113335492/sr=1-20/ref=sr_1_20/102-0713696-7149723?v=glance&s=music

                      "Roller Skates" by Steel Pulse

                      http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B000002HBN/qid=1113335624/sr=2-2/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_2/102-0713696-7149723


                      Thanks for the links Outkaster. I knew the Samples weren't a good example to use, but that was the first song that came to mind with a clear use of the organ in that manner. Just grabbed it for convenience, not authenticity. Thanks for the help and leads.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        One white dude weighs in:
                        I went through a period of time where almost all of the music I listened to was roots reggae and early dub. By this I mean Yabba You, anything Tubby or Scratch produced in their prime, Toots, and that one amazing Skatalites album African Roots.
                        During this time I was making weirdo psyche-expermental music that was nothing like the music I spent most of my time listening to. My hair was short, unfakedredded, and I wore clothes I got at goodwill just like every other hip kid in Portland.
                        I was also very interested in rastafarianism intellectually, but would never consider taking it seriously because 1) I'm white, 2) I'm gay, 3) I'm not a christian, and have no love for that whole strain of religious thought. In other words, I am babylon. I'm ok with that.
                        However, I remain in awe of the early rastafarians and their innovative philosophies and interpretations of scripture, along with the strength it took to retain and develop that community throughout the harsh periods of police repression which continue to this day. Their disapproval of me personally does nothing to take away my distanced respect for the true brethren.
                        During this time in Portland Oregon there was a glut of hippies who were also having their own obsession with the island, and suddenly all the phish/dead tie-die wearing kids around town started sporting Haili Selassie necklaces and spouting off about babylon.
                        Roots records in all manner of repressings became suddenly available for quite a bit more than I was paying for them originally (but at least it didn't have the ****************ty vinyl quality issues I was having from island imports..) in record stores all around town.
                        While this had the good effect of getting some really good dancehall nights into local clubs, I found most of these kids to be totally obnoxious.
                        I can easily imagine if I was an actual a) rastafarian, b) jamaican, c) black person, then I would actually find them seriously offensive.
                        When I found myself at parties where these kids were, due to our shared ganja connections, and often I would get into discussions with them about rastafarianism and find myself actually teaching them the basic facts about this whole culture they were in the middle of trying to borrow. Many had no idea who Hallie Selassie was, other than that Bob liked him and had his picture on stage. Even fewer knew what the whole I-and-I thing was about, which to me is one of the great philisophical milestones of the early brethren, and one of the few concepts that can actually be imported to other cultures without seeming inauthentic to me.
                        Almost no one knew the history of this music, and I was shocked on more than one occassion that no one in the room had ever heard Count Ossie's recordings (the true reggae holy grail imho) or knew that he essentially developed this music with the first reggae musicians in his trenchtown community center.. etc etc...
                        The whole point of this ramble is to point out my sympathy with Outcaster's very sensible and tolerant position. Reggae has a certain "lilt", to borrow a phrase from Irish music, which actually probably has links to reggae through all the irish and scots indentured workers who died out/bred into early colonial jamaican society. If you don't hit this "lilt" perfectly, you are going to sound like all the poseur white reggae bands I have had to sit through waiting for Toots or the Abyssianians to play. Unfortunately since we have not so many west indians in Portland, the crowd disapproval was muted (but present).
                        Another thing that can make you sound inauthentic, as outkaster said, is by playing too many notes. If your attention isn't totally focused on the rhythm in reggae, then you aren't playing it right. Every bit of your playing brain has to be focused on the relation of the parts to each other rather than your part alone. Think about "lead guitar" parts is reggae songs: often they are just one well placed lick every few bars, but if they aren't right where they are supposed to be, it sounds sloppy.
                        This is why labeling things as reggae is going to (and should) raise flags in people who are actually involved in the music/culture.
                        I am not trying to diss anyone who has posted, and will even admit that my synth bass playing is "dub-influenced", but I am well aware it would take me years of practice to be able to perform authentic sounding reggae music, nor would I ever even try to do this.
                        todd
                        OT: One thing I would like to do is put out a "fag dancehall" cd to respond to all the "chi chi man burn" bull**************** you hear in most modern dancehall. I would wear an outlandishly tacky outfit on the cover in conscious mockery/parody of the out-of-hand pseudo-pimp style that seems to rule dancehall culture.
                        It would be a single, and probably get me an ass-kicking if it was good enough that anyone who cared heard it, but whatever.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Interesting post. Like I said I have really no problem with anyone playing what they want. It is just when I see these all white psuedo-Reggae bands with dredlock dudes thinking this is how it is. In fact like I said Reggae has gone beyond Bob's death and that is not meant to be disrespectful too him. But I too I found most of these dudes to be totally obnoxious. There is a definate division in these types of people in music. Rasta culture is very defiant and hippyish in a way that is why people are drawn to it that come from Rich homes.

                          I see it all the time. People that play Allman Brothers music or Dead music will always sound that way unless they get out of their own backyard and learn something new. Personally I think some of that hurts you as a musician because Rock keybaord playing is a restricted medium. Keyboard players take a back seat in a lot of types of music as it is. Guiatrists always get noticed and I get sick of that ****************. That is why diversing yourself in music is good and learning a style well get's you work. At least with Reggae I was able to play good melody learnning horn parts, playing rhythm and even bass parts. I found my niche that brought me a lot of joy and still does. I am also able to go into blues or rock with no feeling of contridiction. Anyway a fag dancehall CD would be interesting but I doubt it would be taken too seriously by the hardcorp dancehall crews dem!
                          <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello&quot;</div>

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            IMO opinion genre purism is boring and counter productive. Some of the best music is achieved by exploring and pushing the boundaries.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Puta
                              IMO opinion genre purism is boring and counter productive. Some of the best music is achieved by exploring and pushing the boundaries.


                              Sometimes, and Reggae has done that fusing itself with hip hop but alot of older people do not like it and feel it ruins Reggae. I will not get into another flame war about this. It is not about pushing any boundries at all so what the **************** do you mean? It does not have **************** to do with what this thread is about. What do you care about what I do. Have you played semi-professionally, met international artists, backed-up national artists. It has nothing to do with being counter-productive. You like what you like and I will do and play as I please.
                              <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello&quot;</div>

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                I would never speak against experimentation, nor the mixing of genres/styles. That's pretty much what I do personally in my bands' music.
                                However, most music until pretty modern times (with the birth of the recording industry) came from a tradition of musicians playing to each other and judging each other by a standard that was set by the musicians that came before them. IMHO, this was a beautiful thing which I see less and less of everyday.
                                I'm not trying to start a flame war or stop people from playing whatever music they want to, but I also don't want to see that body of knowledge that those musicians represent go away any more than it already has!
                                This came up in a discussion I was having this afternoon with a friend of mine who is a fine banjo player.
                                Began in high school by being a good guitarist, moved to mandolin, and then started going to bluegrass festivals. The interaction with the musicians at those festivals totally changed his playing, and now he is one of those guys that gets his friends in the Library of Congress to pirate unreleased alan lomax recordings so he can learn more weird old banjo tunes.
                                Does that mean he's somehow uncreative for wanting his musical life to follow a more traditional road? It certainly has not made him reticient to come down to my band's studio and improvise crazy backward banjo loops into phrase samplers and other things you're typical old-timey person may find quite suspect. What's wrong with tradition? This is for discussion, I'm not trying to argue with anyone.
                                todd
                                p.s: That whole "fag dancehall" single is a joke, obviously. The only attention I would likely recieve is for it's ironic value alone, although as we have seen, that could still get it reviewed in the Wire.

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