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Any favorite B3 settings for Reggae?

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  • Any favorite B3 settings for Reggae?

    Are there any drawbar, vibrato, percussion, key click (B4), spin, settings that are considered standards for Reggae (think classic Bob Marley tones)? Anyone have any favorites they like to use?

  • #2
    I found that most of the standard jazz settings work well with reggae. Stick with 3rd percussion most of the time, and lean on the lower drawbars.Sees like lots of Chroale speed Leslie, too, to get that trippy, spaced out sound.

    Comment


    • #3
      A lot of low and high drawbars as well, just scoop the middle ones. I sometimes use it.
      <div class="signaturecontainer">Chuck Norris once cured a young boy of being deaf, then prompty killed him with a roundhouse kick to the face...just to prove that good Chuck giveth, and the good Chuck taketh away.</div>

      Comment


      • #4
        I play Reggae exclusively and the problem is with any old Jamaican recordings is there is not a lot of information out there on it. It is hard to find the settings because they do not exist on the net. Most of the information is passed on to other players because that style of playing is very hard to get used to. Reggae is not a big music in the US. A lot of people do not play it correctly also which leads to more confusion. A lot of the hippy Jam/Reggae bands have it wrong too. Most of the guys now in Jamaica are not using Hammonds anymore. The guy in Third World is new member and he was using a Triton last time I saw him. I will be out in Vegas in another month with the top band in the area and I will ask the keyboardist out there. I know a guy locally that toured with Sugar Minot and he could not remember his drawbar settings. Wire Lindo with the Wailers used a bubble setting that is hard to reproduce. The Leslie is NOT always on in Reggae and NO percussion. Jazz settings are not desireable. The manual drawbar settings are different. A bubble sound is clean, no percussion, Chorus 3, and has to be heard. Contact me privately and I will give you the setting I use.
        <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello&quot;</div>

        Comment


        • #5
          Reggae and ska organ is an entire idiom unto itself. I have studied and played this genre extensively and it is one of my favorite types of music to listen to and play. The Bob Marley songs are major milestones for reggae keyboards.

          The majority of what you are hearing is a Hammond B3 and Leslie with various drawbar settings. Usually it is a hollow whistle tone on the lower manual like 0084000006 doing "ghost notes" on the down beat and a strong fundamental organ sound like 888000000 on the upbeat played on the upper manual of the organ. If you don't have a real Hammond with two manuals, you can set up a keyboard split. A regular flute sound also works nice for reggae chopping...think about the sound for "Waiting in Vain" which is a Hammond, but very flutelike - I'm guessing the drawbar setting would translate to 008400004, but also sounds very nice with a straight flute sound.

          Generally speaking, several sounds that will work well in reggae (in addition to other styles of music):

          - 888000000
          - 888000008
          - 888800000
          - 800000008
          - 808000008
          - 058223678

          There is a wide variety of sounds that work for the reggae sound, though the majority of the sound actually comes from the rhythmic style as opposed to the drawbar setting or other sound choice.

          One way I remember practicing this was to help get over the tendency to play on the downbeats. I would "fake" the downbeats by hitting the top of the keyboard with one hand and then play the upbeats on the keyboard with the other hand. Once you get this rhythm mastered, you can start playing around with some "ghost notes" in the left hand while chopping upbeats with the right hand. Basically with the "faking" part you are playing in the left hand and hitting more solidly on the right hand:

          1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &
          L R L R L R L R

          Bob Marley had a second keyboard playing Hohner clavinet with wah and also an analog synth sweep on some songs.

          Hope this helps. You may already know a lot of this, but like Outkaster mentioned, the reggae keyboard idiom does not get a whole lot of press.

          Regards,
          Eric
          <div class="signaturecontainer"><i><font size="1"><font color="dimgray"><b>Originally posted by p120dUdE</b></font></font></i><br />
          These are family forums, and many young kids come here and read them.<br />
          <br />
          I am sure there will be no problems, but if there is, my moderation team will take action.<br />
          <br />
          <i><font size="1"><font color="DimGray"><b>Originally posted by ChasIII</b></font></font></i><br />
          Im so sick of keyboards. All this keyboard stuff people always use. All this keyboard synth talk all the time. I'm done with it. Never again.<br />
          <br />
          Im thinking that at some point I will have to stop this and start doing other things. Any thoughts, feelings, or ideas?</div>

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by eric
            Reggae and ska organ is an entire idiom unto itself. I have studied and played this genre extensively and it is one of my favorite types of music to listen to and play. The Bob Marley songs are major milestones for reggae keyboards.

            The majority of what you are hearing is a Hammond B3 and Leslie with various drawbar settings. Usually it is a hollow whistle tone on the lower manual like 0084000006 doing "ghost notes" on the down beat and a strong fundamental organ sound like 888000000 on the upbeat played on the upper manual of the organ. If you don't have a real Hammond with two manuals, you can set up a keyboard split. A regular flute sound also works nice for reggae chopping...think about the sound for "Waiting in Vain" which is a Hammond, but very flutelike - I'm guessing the drawbar setting would translate to 008400004, but also sounds very nice with a straight flute sound.

            Generally speaking, several sounds that will work well in reggae (in addition to other styles of music):

            - 888000000
            - 888000008
            - 888800000
            - 800000008
            - 808000008
            - 058223678

            There is a wide variety of sounds that work for the reggae sound, though the majority of the sound actually comes from the rhythmic style as opposed to the drawbar setting or other sound choice.

            One way I remember practicing this was to help get over the tendency to play on the downbeats. I would "fake" the downbeats by hitting the top of the keyboard with one hand and then play the upbeats on the keyboard with the other hand. Once you get this rhythm mastered, you can start playing around with some "ghost notes" in the left hand while chopping upbeats with the right hand. Basically with the "faking" part you are playing in the left hand and hitting more solidly on the right hand:

            1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &
            L R L R L R L R

            Bob Marley had a second keyboard playing Hohner clavinet with wah and also an analog synth sweep on some songs.

            Hope this helps. You may already know a lot of this, but like Outkaster mentioned, the reggae keyboard idiom does not get a whole lot of press.

            Regards,
            Eric


            Actually bubbling is something I see people do wrong. Unless I am misunderstanding what you are saying I think you have it backwards, you should not play ghost notes on left hand while bubbling. It has to be right there and solid. The right hand does the coloring. It makes the music sound faster than it is actually going. It takes chops and some patience. Trust me because I have played or backed up some national acts. Most bands have one keyboard player, unless it is a huge act like Yellowman, Ziggy Marley, or Beres Hammond. IF there is one guy he will play rhythm piano right-handed and bubble with the left. With Marley, Lindo did it by holding octaves. Him and Tyrone Downie have long fingers and are monster organ players. They split parts when they played together. Most of the time it was a Clavinet and Hammond C-3 and you would have to be economical to play the right parts or the music would sound empty. Most of the time is was one keybaord player till Bob got more national exposure and then you saw some early synths and Rhodes there for more color.

            I learned for some really good people but you have to like Reggae, in fact love it to play it well and it takes a lot of years to get good it. Unlike other music it is very cultural and Jamaican's guard it fiercely. They will let you know if you can play or not and have no quams about telling you. You have to know Marley, Dancehall, Studio One Rhythms, Ska and Rock Steady. You have to have chops, be able to play horn lines, clav lines, duplicate bass lines, play in between bass lines, and play electric piano parts. Like Jazz standards they are expected to be none.

            Sorry to ramble on and I know it is not part of the orginal question but it is important to get perspective on the music and not treat it like just any rock or pop music.
            <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello&quot;</div>

            Comment


            • #7
              Great topic and I enjoy reading what you are saying, Outkaster. What I'm trying to describe on the "ghost notes" is kind of hard to put into words and is probably more applicable to when you are bubbling with both hands, rather than doing something contrapuntal like a melody in the right hand whilst keeping the bubble going in the left hand. "Ghost note" is probably the wrong term. I am talking about strict rhythm playing and yes you are right, it needs to be right there and be strong. However, there is opportunity to slap the left hand in time on a variety of notes, whether it be the same chord as the right hand is playing, or a cluster of notes. When you have a whistle tone on the Hammond, it sounds cool to play percussively and not necessarily the exact chord. Some players treat it like playing congas. I may be going deeper here, but I think of the left hand as auxilary percussion that slaps in time, but moves up and down on the keyboard, stabbing clusters to create some extra character.

              You have some cool ties to the music. I have been lucky enough to open for the Wailers several times and also Eeek a Mouse. There was a killer regional reggae band in the mid-late 80's called The Good Guys and I originally learned the art of bubbling from their lead singer/key player. The band I was in shared the stage with The Good Guys countless times and I sat in with them as well. I have also played on the same stage with a number of regional & national ska bands like The Toaster, The Bosstones, Bim Skala Bim, The Pie Tasters and others.

              Regards,
              Eric
              <div class="signaturecontainer"><i><font size="1"><font color="dimgray"><b>Originally posted by p120dUdE</b></font></font></i><br />
              These are family forums, and many young kids come here and read them.<br />
              <br />
              I am sure there will be no problems, but if there is, my moderation team will take action.<br />
              <br />
              <i><font size="1"><font color="DimGray"><b>Originally posted by ChasIII</b></font></font></i><br />
              Im so sick of keyboards. All this keyboard stuff people always use. All this keyboard synth talk all the time. I'm done with it. Never again.<br />
              <br />
              Im thinking that at some point I will have to stop this and start doing other things. Any thoughts, feelings, or ideas?</div>

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by eric
                Great topic and I enjoy reading what you are saying, Outkaster. What I'm trying to describe on the "ghost notes" is kind of hard to put into words and is probably more applicable to when you are bubbling with both hands, rather than doing something contrapuntal like a melody in the right hand whilst keeping the bubble going in the left hand. "Ghost note" is probably the wrong term. I am talking about strict rhythm playing and yes you are right, it needs to be right there and be strong. However, there is opportunity to slap the left hand in time on a variety of notes, whether it be the same chord as the right hand is playing, or a cluster of notes. When you have a whistle tone on the Hammond, it sounds cool to play percussively and not necessarily the exact chord. Some players treat it like playing congas. I may be going deeper here, but I think of the left hand as auxilary percussion that slaps in time, but moves up and down on the keyboard, stabbing clusters to create some extra character.

                You have some cool ties to the music. I have been lucky enough to open for the Wailers several times and also Eeek a Mouse. There was a killer regional reggae band in the mid-late 80's called The Good Guys and I originally learned the art of bubbling from their lead singer/key player. The band I was in shared the stage with The Good Guys countless times and I sat in with them as well. I have also played on the same stage with a number of regional & national ska bands like The Toaster, The Bosstones, Bim Skala Bim, The Pie Tasters and others.

                Regards,
                Eric


                That's cool. If you have another keyboard player it makes it easier to play, alot easier. Most ska bands are not really Ska and I really don't get into that **************** anyway. It is the easiest of the music compared to roots and culture stuff which is really the style we are talking about. I was luck enough to either open for or back up the following. Third World, Beres Hammond, Yellowman, Wailing Souls, Lady Saw, Beenie Man, Sanzchez, Toots and the Maytals, Michael Rose (Black Urhu), Leory Gibbons, The Roots (not reggae) and a few others I cannot remember. I have been lucky and blessed to play this much music.
                <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello&quot;</div>

                Comment


                • #9
                  first of all, i had no idea we had some hard core reggae peeps here. i am happy and pleased. i am not a hardcore reggae peep, but i do care very very much about this music.

                  let me preface this by saying that i'm into all three tempos of jamaican music: ska, reggae, and dub. (yeah i know rocksteady is in there somewhere but come on ... let's keep it to three.)

                  i've noticed that people are into 2 of the three, but never all three. if someone can explain this to me i would appreciate it.

                  Originally posted by Outkaster
                  A lot of the hippy Jam/Reggae bands have it wrong too.


                  no way ... hippies do it best! wether it be improvisational jazz, electronic music, bluegrass, or reggae.

                  Originally posted by Outkaster
                  Most ska bands are not really Ska and I really don't get into that **************** anyway. It is the easiest of the music compared to roots and culture stuff which is really the style we are talking about.


                  first line: correct!

                  second line: i strongly disagree!

                  traditional ska ain't easy. to play trad ska you must first be into jazz, and then move into trad ska.

                  saying proper ska is easy is like saying bebop is simple. whatever.

                  uh third wave ska is easy. but it's not ska.

                  i would REALLY like to have the world's first trad ska organ trio (organ, guitar, drums) but every time i try to move in this direction, whatever jazz wanker i'm playing with on guitar either doesn't feel it or doesn't like the idea or the drummer can't handle it or doesn't like it and can't handle it and it's totally ****************ing frustrating.

                  so i gave up on the trad ska organ trio. could i comprimise by playing all three tempos? yes. i can. will anyone around here go with me on it? no. of course not.

                  "so suit, why don't you just play organ in a normal reggae band?" well i have this little problem of if i'm not playing bass with my left hand i freak out. i have some recordings of me "bubbling" on some two-tone stuff ... i can post it if you guys REALLY want to hear it, but it's not something i'd brag about. it wasn't very good two-tone music.

                  so ... no ... i don't play traditional jamaican techniques here on the hammond ... i have to do my own thing. if that means holding down the dub bass with my left hand/pedal while doing RH upbeats or making spacey dub textures with my looping rig then so be it.

                  here is an example of completely un-authentic dub reggae organ playing: http://suitandtieguy.com/sounds/01_11_2004_seminary/stgb_01_11_2004_seminary_dub_force_rising.mp3

                  btw, anyone as happy as i was to see Ernest Ranglin and Monty Alexander on the cover of Downbeat a few months ago?
                  <div class="signaturecontainer">main: <a href="http://suitandtieguy.com" target="_blank">http://suitandtieguy.com</a><br />
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                  Comment


                  • #10
                    forgot to mention ...

                    i really enjoy reading this thread.
                    <div class="signaturecontainer">main: <a href="http://suitandtieguy.com" target="_blank">http://suitandtieguy.com</a><br />
                    Lawrence Miles style rants: <a href="http://suitandtieguy.livejournal.com" target="_blank">http://suitandtieguy.livejournal.com</a><br />
                    handbuilt boutique synthesiser modules: <a href="http://stgsoundlabs.com" target="_blank">http://stgsoundlabs.com</a><br />
                    my digital albums: <a href="http://suitandtieguy.bandcamp.com" target="_blank">http://suitandtieguy.bandcamp.com</a></div>

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Here is the problem. I hate to say it but the jam/hippy bands have no idea Reggae went on after Bob died. They might like Steel Pulse,Aswad or even Gregory Issacs. I could mention artists like Luciano, Dennis Brown, Beres Hammond, Chevelle Franklin, Vegas, Morgan Hertiage and countless others and they always have NO idea who I am talking about. There is a big, I mean huge division in these type of Reggae bands. I have seen Johns Brown Body a "white" Reggae band play here in NYS, they are national also. I was with Jamaican musicians this one time and they said they "execute the music wrong". I also saw that same band open for Third World in 2002 in front of a West Indian/Black crowd at a city festival. All the dead/fish/hippy dredlocks thought it was the ****************. Most of the West Indian crowd did not care. They are not going to because it is thier cultural music. Unless it is a big mixed band like UB40 you do not get the respect from the crowd. Sorry it is too bad but that is how it is. Believe me they are a hard crowd to play to. I just did a Marley tribute on Feb 5th. I played about 40 songs, some backing up other guest rock musicians and some with my own band. These guy's butchered the songs and it was hard to play with them. Almost embarrassing but I was getting paid and doing a favor because these are good guys. They needed a house keybaordist and I was playing anyway so I said yes. My band got up there and did a 23 minute set and blew everyone out of the water. I hate to brag but we practiced it, have people that know the music in the band, and execute it traditionally.


                      The biggest problem is these musicians do not know all the styles. Piano playing in Ska is all rhythm and personally I do not think it is all that hard. Reggae is after Rock Steady and something that came later on. Dub is more engineer driven and you have to have someone that understands it running the board. Playing dub has to be instinctual and sorry for a lot of people it is not. Drums and Bass are the key instruments in Reggae, not guitars (thank ****************in god), and not horns. Sorry to rant on but this is something I know about and have been playing for years. I would be glad to help anyone interested in learning it.
                      <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello&quot;</div>

                      Comment


                      • Kalshkush
                        Kalshkush commented
                        Editing a comment

                        Hi Outkaster! We don


                    • #12
                      but every time i try to move in this direction, whatever jazz wanker i'm playing with on guitar either doesn't feel it or doesn't like the idea or the drummer can't handle it or doesn't like it and can't handle it and it's totally ****************ing frustrating.




                      I have the same problem with my funk band every time we don't play a two chord jam WHOA! Dm9!

                      but, back on topic:

                      I use 888875568, third percussion for 'I shot the sheriff'

                      interesting conversation...keep it coming
                      <div class="signaturecontainer"><font face="Courier New"><font size="5"><b> &gt;&gt;&gt; </b><a href="http://www.chromelegs.nl" target="_blank">www.chromelegs.nl</a></font></font></div>

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                      • #13
                        Originally posted by Roald




                        I have the same problem with my funk band every time we don't play a two chord jam WHOA! Dm9!

                        but, back on topic:

                        I use 888875568, third percussion for 'I shot the sheriff'

                        interesting conversation...keep it coming


                        Yeah like most music there are just certain things you have to do. Drums and bass just have to be right. R and B and Funk players are another one that have a hard time being diciplined enough. The snare always leads of a Reggae tune especially Marley. The drum fills take you to different parts of the song. From verse to chorus and so on. By the way this is a left hand bubble setting I use.

                        8411012001
                        <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello&quot;</div>

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          Thanks for allthe input guys; very interesting tangent developing here too.

                          I know I'm going to sound like an idiot here, and I hope I don't offend, but could someone explain "bubbling" to me? I'm a guitarist with some piano experience and I'm just getting into organ playing. I don't expect to ever be good enough to do any real Reggae right, but there are elements to the organ playing that I find simply mesmorizing. I want to try to learn as much Reggae and gospel technique as I can to mix in with my songs. There's just such a unique groove and feel to the sound, I HAVE to learn it.

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Originally posted by Cogan
                            Thanks for allthe input guys; very interesting tangent developing here too.

                            I know I'm going to sound like an idiot here, and I hope I don't offend, but could someone explain "bubbling" to me? I'm a guitarist with some piano experience and I'm just getting into organ playing. I don't expect to ever be good enough to do any real Reggae right, but there are elements to the organ playing that I find simply mesmorizing. I want to try to learn as much Reggae and gospel technique as I can to mix in with my songs. There's just such a unique groove and feel to the sound, I HAVE to learn it.


                            No it is a good question. Basically is the pulse pumping in the background of most roots and culture music. It is very hard to describe but easier to show because you can learn it wrong. Like I said before is makes the music sound like it is going faster than it iis. That is the technique Eric and I were talking about. Learn it on any old Wailers, Marley, Toots or Steel Pulse records. It is the single hardest keyboard riff in Reggae to learn. It is in between the piano part. I wish I could describe it but you have to go get some recordings and just listen to it. If you can get a song you like I can tell you a little more once you listen to it. Chances are I may know it.
                            <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello&quot;</div>

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