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  • Does it make any difference if you tune down a half step on a keyboard and run the midi out to the VL2? Would it still follow correctly. Thanks PS may add our keyboard says you can't,It's his VL 2, it just don't make since, But I don't know that much about midi.

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    • This harmony machine is great. I have had vocalists try to sing with me for many years, and nothing hurts more than a background vocalist who hits the wrong note, or is pitchy. I control the harmony with my guitar parts...and it is so fun and ear candy. If you sing, you should try out this unit. It will be in my live rig. Thanks for the VL2 tips, and I went and printed the pdf manual listed in your posting. It has more pages and more information than the quick start guide. This should be a very useful tool for this unit.
      Check out my band website at: http://www.myspace.com/paxvoxband

      Check out seven of our band videos at:
      http://www.youtube.com/results?searc...rch_type=&aq=f

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      • Jon, Tom or anyone versed in the TC VL2,



        In addition to my efforts as a singing performer I also do occasional teaching in elementary school music programmes. With a voice an octave lower than the kids I have to sing falsetto to match their pitch when teaching rote melodies. I hate doing this because until the kids get used to it and start listening to each other some of the boys can get silly. In this day and age many boys don't really sing. (Think of the role models....rap....heavy metal screamers etc.) When I get beyond the craziness of the falsetto and the boys realize they're suppoosed to sing at the same pitch as the girls, I can get some pretty good quality.



        I was wondering if the VL2 would enable me to output a quality solo "feminized" voice which would make life as a male music teacher with a dropped voice much easier. Any thoughts?

        God Bless,

        Don

        Comment


        • I've sang falsetto while teaching guitar class middle school and the kids loved it. Mind you I have a smooth clear falsetto and I was showing how the Beach Boys sang some of their parts.



          As to your question that depends on your interpretation of the phrase "quality solo feminized voice". Yes there are gender changes and yes you can transpose your voice up an octave and yes the result is good by comparison to earlier harmonizers.

          Comment








          • Quote Originally Posted by Chumly
            View Post

            As to your question that depends on your interpretation of the phrase "quality solo feminized voice". Yes there are gender changes and yes you can transpose your voice up an octave and yes the result is good by comparison to earlier harmonizers.




            The VoiceLive 2 actually has "degrees of gender." (No wisecracks, please.) After you transpose up an octave, and turn the Lead Mute function to On, you go to the Gender control, which has variables from -50 to +50. At 0, the quality of the original is unchanged. Progressing downward through the negative numbers introduces increasingly masculine qualities, while positive numbers make the voice increasingly feminine. At a couple of degrees below 0, a male voice sounds like a countertenor, and further down yields a tenor. Above 0, it first sounds like an alto, then a boy soprano, then a female soprano, then a little girl. All but the outer extremes are fairly usable.



            Here's a wave file of the previous recording of "Danny Boy" (it's about 18 MB, so you might want to right/option-click and save to your hard disk before playing), with the voice transposed up an octave, and the Gender dial at 4 (just slightly feminine). I wanted to preserve some of the darker qualities of a male voice singing high, but give it a more natural, female sound (in this register).



            Note that this recording is glitchy; you can hear the original octave trying to "break through," and it's a bit warbly. This is because I didn't bother to go through auto-setup. I just ran the recorded audio through the preset. But it gives you an idea, and I think this would be fine for teaching kids a melody. Of course, they'd still hear your original voice (in the lower octave) acoustically, even if you engaged the Lead Mute feature.
            Jon Chappell
            Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jon_chappell
            Check out my website: http://jonchappell.com

            Comment








            • Quote Originally Posted by Chumly
              View Post

              I've sang falsetto while teaching guitar class middle school and the kids loved it. Mind you I have a smooth clear falsetto and I was showing how the Beach Boys sang some of their parts.



              As to your question that depends on your interpretation of the phrase "quality solo feminized voice". Yes there are gender changes and yes you can transpose your voice up an octave and yes the result is good by comparison to earlier harmonizers.




              Thanks Chumly,



              I usually do "cool" falsetto first (often "Lion Sleeps Tonight") to break the ice but I'm working most often with Grade one to six students and the songs used are not "fun falsetto". I actually found a setting on the Digitech Vocalist 4 that I'm renting that gave me a decent "female" vocal. I can't wait to try out a TC Voice Live 2 as I think that is what I will end up with as I've heard good quality sound and good feedback from my 'net research on this unit. It is pricey but it is probably the best.



              Jon,



              Thanks for the gender bending version of Danny Boy. It demonstrates the possibility of getting even more use out of the TC VL 2 by using it while teaching. The interesting thing about the vocal difference between a woman or child's voice and a man's lower octave is that 4 and 5 year olds in Kindergarten don't even notice I'm singing differently. They just naturally use their natural voices. By Grade One and Two most of them are emulating my dropped voice which makes them sound poorly. As soon as they get over a man singing like a woman I start to get quality sound from them. I can see using one of these units speeding up the process of attaining that quality vocal sound from the kids. Another complicating factor in this whole process is the fact that most boys don't realize they should be singing at the same pitch as the girls unless they have a "changed voice". This was a real problem in working with the older boys around "middle school age". I used to teach music K to 8 and we had no band programme so it was largely vocal. With the guys interest in "rap" and "heavy rock screaming" there wasn't a whole lot of interest in quality vocals.



              Again guys I appreciate the advice and help. Either one of you used the Diitech unit I'm currently trying out. It seems to work pretty well but I find the harmonies kind of "breathy".



              God Bless,

              Don

              Comment


              • I just sold the VL4, my rationale is found in post 97.

                Comment


                • I'm confused, Chumly: In Post #97 you said that all three units have the same problems. I don't believe you singled out any one as better or worse then the others. Why did you sell the Vocalist Live 4 rather than the Voiceworks? I assume you're not going to buy the VoiceLive 2, so I suppose that means that the Voiceworks unit wins, right? Why is this unit better then the other two? According to your post they all suffer from faulty phantom power and lack of true bypass.



                  For the record, I have a lot of experience with the Voice Tone pedals--the less expensive line of TCH's vocal products--and I've never experienced any of these problems. But I certainly do not have anything like engineer-ears, so that might be the problem. But in this case, ignorance may indeed be bliss!
                  Jersey Jack

                  Gibson J45 & Hummingbird
                  Martin 000-28
                  Deering Sierra Banjo

                  "If you don’t like Springsteen that means you don’t like Woody Guthrie, which means you don’t like songs." Justin Townes Earle

                  Comment








                  • Quote Originally Posted by kvalois
                    View Post

                    I would love to read a concise overview of how the Harmony G stacks up to the Voice Live 2.



                    Is the Voice Live 2 TOO DIFFICULT to master for people who are not savvy in all this "technical" talk????



                    Also, as "gmhuber" cautions in his You Tube video of the VL 2-- is there a problem with using the VL 2 to record?? According to "gmhuber," TC Helicon itself admits that there is a "bug" to be fixed!!!!!




                    I'd like to bump this topic a bit: I have a Harmony-G and a Voicetone Correct that work really well. (Also, I often use the Harmony-G alone, again with fine results.)



                    I sing mostly Americana--Hank Williams, Steve Earle, Dylan, Gram Parsons, Uncle Tupelo, Ryan Adams, etc.--a style that doesn't demand much by way of vocal effects. I use a simple reverb patch and a simple delay patch and that's it.



                    I use the harmonizer sparingly, only when I do the occasional solo gig. I have no need of advanced or complicated harmony production.



                    But the VL2 is soooo sexxxxy! and I'm trying to find some reasonable excuse to upgrade. Can anyone help me out? Given my genre and the gear I already have, why should I upgrade to the VL2?
                    Jersey Jack

                    Gibson J45 & Hummingbird
                    Martin 000-28
                    Deering Sierra Banjo

                    "If you don’t like Springsteen that means you don’t like Woody Guthrie, which means you don’t like songs." Justin Townes Earle

                    Comment








                    • Quote Originally Posted by Jersey Jack
                      View Post

                      I'm confused, Chumly: In Post #97 you said that all three units have the same problems. I don't believe you singled out any one as better or worse then the others. Why did you sell the Vocalist Live 4 rather than the Voiceworks? I assume you're not going to buy the VoiceLive 2, so I suppose that means that the Voiceworks unit wins, right? Why is this unit better then the other two? According to your post they all suffer from faulty phantom power and lack of true bypass.



                      For the record, I have a lot of experience with the Voice Tone pedals--the less expensive line of TCH's vocal products--and I've never experienced any of these problems. But I certainly do not have anything like engineer-ears, so that might be the problem. But in this case, ignorance may indeed be bliss!




                      You're right in that I have not singled out any one as better or worse then the others and certainly with respect to my AKG C420 headset and phantom power I am not real happy with any of the three, however I can't at this stage tell with certainly if all three are equal in terms of transparency, transient response and artifacts when run in series with all processing off.



                      I sold the Vocalist Live 4 rather than the Voiceworks because I bought the Vocalist Live 4 very recently and got it for a good price and sold it for a good price so my loss was low. I kept the Voiceworks because I've had it for a long time so I know it like the back of my hand, it's not worth much any more so selling it does not net much, it cleans up the floor (literally as it's rack mounted) it's MIDI addressable so that's great for triggering from my laptop and automating the whole affair and because it's in the same rack as my mixer it's simple to configure it in parallel and easy to have the mixer supply the phantom power. By the way I've chatted with a number of pro-audio guys and the consensus is that many devices do not have robust enough phantom power.



                      I now have a few choices 1) buy the VoiceLive 2 as I do like the guitar input feature, MIDI, footswitch functionality and perhaps it's the least problematic in bypass mode or 2) buy nothing and wait.



                      I wish I could say with certainty that the VoiceLive 2 affects the sound the least when in bypass mode and that I can live with it but I can't with certainty...few things in life have certainty except death and taxes.



                      I have not tried the other TCH's vocal products and it makes a huge difference what gear you hook the toys to. Because I use IEM's live nuances that are lost in traditional monitoring systems are as plain as the nose on my face, The AKG C420 is a really lovely sounding mic (for my voice) but being a condenser it tends to be demanding and that combined with my IEM's puts me in a very articulate sonic world compared to the classic dynamic mic / wedge combo.



                      I feel I have pretty crisp ears...my Dad considered himself an audiophile yet he could not tell the difference between a source CD and a high end cassette machine running Dolby C recorded directly from the CD source. My wife can't be sure if I am playing through my Boss GT-10 or Roland VG-99 even after I point out which machine is able to do what. My duo partner (eDrummer) from some years ago sometimes was not sure which parts I was playing and which parts were sequenced.



                      OTOH my wife is into colors and shapes and decorates our house according to some impenetrable mystic black art.

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                      • finally i finishd setting up the Voice live 2, it sounds great.

                        But i have a big problem when I sing on stage and the speakers are loud, it sounds like everything that is on stage is getting harmonized. not only the vocals, is there anything i could do that only what cones out of the mic should be harmomized and not the rest of the musical sounds?

                        Comment








                        • Quote Originally Posted by joe1
                          View Post

                          finally i finishd setting up the Voice live 2, it sounds great.

                          But i have a big problem when I sing on stage and the speakers are loud, it sounds like everything that is on stage is getting harmonized. not only the vocals, is there anything i could do that only what cones out of the mic should be harmomized and not the rest of the musical sounds?




                          I've had that happen, too. You may need to change mics, and go to a tighter pickup pattern -- from a cardioid to a hypercardioid (which has better side rejection). Either that, or work to reduce or re-direct your stage-monitor volume. Obviously, if you use an IEM (in-ear monitor) system, you don't have this problem, but that's a more costly solution.



                          [NOTE: Because HC is transitioning from the old platform to the new, any new posts made from now until we launch the new site (by about January 4) will not carry over. Please read the full announcement at the top of the Pro Reviews Forum page. -JC]
                          Jon Chappell
                          Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jon_chappell
                          Check out my website: http://jonchappell.com

                          Comment








                          • Quote Originally Posted by Jon Chappell
                            View Post

                            I've had that happen, too. You may need to change mics, and go to a tighter pickup pattern -- from a cardioid to a hypercardioid (which has better side rejection). Either that, or work to reduce or re-direct your stage-monitor volume. Obviously, if you use an IEM (in-ear monitor) system, you don't have this problem, but that's a more costly solution.



                            [NOTE: Because HC is transitioning from the old platform to the new, any new posts made from now until we launch the new site (by about January 4) will not carry over. Please read the full announcement at the top of the Pro Reviews Forum page. -JC]




                            I am using the Audix om5 which is hypercardioid and its not helping to much, maybe you have a better mic solution for me? The IEM i also have but i like to hear what the croud hears so its going to be my last solution,

                            Thanks again Jon you are the man

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                            • Quote:

                              One thing I learned from reading the Voice Live 2 manual is that with its USB, it can be interfaced with a computer for recording. At first it looked like USB disabled the midi, which it does in terms of the actual midi ports, but on further reading it looks like the keyboard is still input through the USB. Can anyone tell me if the VL2 can be used this way, actually saving you the expense of an audio interface for the computer for recording purposes. This would definitely make it worth saving for.



                              Quote:

                              My understanding from the manual is that you could a feed a midi signal via the midi in of the device, however, the USB works strictly for audio... For further and better replies, I would post your question under the Voice Live 2 review.



                              The VL2 manual clearly states that Midi and USB cannot be active at the same time. My query is in regard to being able to record midi info into the computer through the USB. I haven't gone too deeply into recording but I do know that if your audio interface has midi capabilty you could record midi keyboard through MIDI IN as well as being able to record keyboard audio output through the audio in. (The audio recording is what you would want to have in your finished recording. Using midi recording of the keyboard parts would require a keyboard or sound module and would save you disk space but you would have to ultimately have the keyboard parts recorded as audio. So if the VL2 can only input the midi instrument as an audio signal it would still work as an audio interface.)



                              The manual actually mentions that the VL2 can provide an audio interface with your computer. The thing is most interfaces have midi ports whereas it sounds like with the VL2 you either have midi transmission or USB interchange but one incapacitates the other. Does anyone have any insight on this?

                              God Bless,

                              Don

                              Comment








                              • Quote Originally Posted by smallmouth
                                View Post

                                The manual actually mentions that the VL2 can provide an audio interface with your computer. The thing is most interfaces have midi ports whereas it sounds like with the VL2 you either have midi transmission or USB interchange but one incapacitates the other. Does anyone have any insight on this?




                                The MIDI ports are disabled when the USB is connected, but MIDI is carried over USB when activated. Here's the passage from page 86 in the manual:

                                USB CONTROL

                                Setting this parameter ON should only be done when USB is connected.When this is ON, the MIDI in and out connectors are disabled and instead, MIDI is routed in and out via the USB connector only. When USB CONTROL is set to OFF, MIDI is disabled over USB and instead, the MIDI in and out connectors function for MIDI.
                                Jon Chappell
                                Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jon_chappell
                                Check out my website: http://jonchappell.com

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