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Tim Mayock

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  1. I recently discovered that good posture includes you jaw placement. I have been chronically pushing my jaw back and that feels like it sends my head back a bit and my jaw up. I found some good TMJ exercises on Youtube and just started practicing them.
  2. I think part of this is how drums vs cymbals are heard on the throne vs 3-5 feet away. a snare hit sounds louder on top of the snare where cymbals might need some distance to bloom. cymbal crashes are much louder if you are say the bassist standing outside of the kit. I own a kit and I play around with drums really experimenting with how to hit a kick and snare for maximum tone and placement in a recording. I don't have any game and can't bear to record myself. Some day I will start a routine of practice to get it going on.
  3. I would love to try a Maple back and sides Martin. I have a Goya Om, a M-24 and it has a sound that records well in a mid to fast tempo strum application. I wonder what a ladder braced Martin would sound like.
  4. I think setup can be a part of the sound. Higher action can add bass to a guitar. It seems like it would be the opposite, but i have noticed a different sound when my D-18 was set up with slightly higher action.
  5. I played in a string band for a while and really wanted a D-28 to help keep up with a loud dobro. That said I have owned a 1970 D-18 for 45 years and it is an awesome instrument to record. It sits in a mix better than a similar aged HD-28 owned by my brother. I have recently purchase a CEO-7 and it is also a really great mahogany back and sides instrument that records really well. I would not discount the hogs I think they are a bit tighter when recorded.
  6. My advice would be to record rehearsals and use the recordings to learn as a band about balance. Also play the originals and compare. I have a stereo ribbon mic I use as it does not hype cymbals like a cheap condenser mic, but any 2 trk recording is a good start. I'm older and have lived this in so many bands. My philosophy is we are character actors and the vocal is the lead role. Our job is to support the vocal or soloist at that point in the song. Are we trying to be entertainers or trying to entertain ourselves?
  7. Those are not cheap! I bet they are great though. I am curious to hear what others say about the self balance thing. I know it is less fun for the drummer, but what do you hear if you compare live drum mixes and popular recorded music of the past fifty years. Live is almost always louder. but the balance used to be controlled by a sound man. I hear a definite drum /cymbal inversion This is what happens in small rooms. I guess I am trying to persuade drummers to adapt and that there is a technique element and a correct tool for the job. A carpenter would not bring a sledge hammer to do detail work. Lots of drummers only bring their sledgehammers, also a Black Beauty snare drum is an amazing sounding drum, but it is probably not the best choice as your only snare drum.
  8. https://youtu.be/nCgmkkaaMEU I really like what is said in this video. In the 80's and 90's guitarists played bigger amps and often there was a larger sound system run by a sound man. Here in Ct we have been playing smaller rooms with smaller amps and have had to self mix. Yes the money sucks here and probably does in your state. It appears that this trend is not going away. I did a gig recently where the room sound was a tipping point for me and I just could not hear anything over the hi-hat and ride cymbal. It was just terrible, yet they want us back. Our drummer has tried to compensate by playing really lightly on the snare and the result is the cymbals are much louder than the snare. He was playing bundles, but the din was still just overwhelming. He is not alone, I hear this a lot. Yet, the thing I hear almost universally in Pop, rock, blues recordings is the snare is on top of the kit balance. I don't think this is a production error or oversight. I would like to hear these practice cymbals and see what they can do. Why do they call them practice cymbals? Can they be a remedy for this trend in live performance?
  9. As the owner of a small commercial studio, reliability and return on investment are critical to me. We all know that full timers like me are in it for love, not money. I buy ‘A’ stock equipment and software from reliable dealers so I have the assurance of customer support. A failure in the middle of a session is an unrecoverable business loss to me and the artists I work with. An extended outage means I’m not working at all. My gear gets great care in a clean, humidity managed control room. I take care of it, and when I have a problem I expect reasonable customer service. Prior to purchasing a Presonus StudioLive 16.4.2 in 2013, I had been running a modded Digi 002 firewire setup for four years. The Digi was faultless and never once glitched. Failures started immediately upon moving the firewire cable from the 002 to the new StudioLive. The once well behaved PC and interface card went to war with the new Presonus driver and mixer. The Presonus driver frequently and randomly would stop working, or stop communicating with the mixer, forcing reboots of the PC, mixer, or both. Sessions were cancelled or stopped early. Business and my artists suffered. So started my saga with Presonus support. After exhausting all the canned solutions and tests I could from the DUC and web self-service options Presonus prefers you to use, I started to contact them via email and phone. If you have not already read this in some other review, forum, or blog post by someone else, let me confirm – Presonus is reliably bad at communicating. They are slow to respond when they do respond, don’t have good case management, and don’t relay important information. It is very frustrating and I would estimate I have spent in excess of a hundred hours in conversations of very questionable value. Beyond these issues lies the larger issue, which is that Presonus won’t take responsibility for standing behind their products. Their support team seems to be charged with blaming any issue on someone else, maybe another manufacturer, maybe even their own customer (that would be you). In my case, I was repeatedly told that my problem was the PC and/or the firewire card. Not forgetting that the prior Digi 002 had no issues in this regard at all, I have purchased two new PC’s based on this ‘diagnosis’. But let me rewind. After the first of these PC purchases, and months of back and forth with Presonus, they had me ship the StudioLive to one of their repair vendors. I received it back with no information on what had been done to it. It worked for ten months, and then the same issue reappeared. This kicked off another lengthy period of frustrating service interactions and my replacement of the second PC. It was just recently that Presonus service revealed that the original service work done on the StudioLive over a year earlier had been to replace the firewire board in the mixer. Basically, I had been correct in suspecting the StudioLive for a year – during which time they deflected me into other unnecessary expenses, and my studio schedule suffered. I recently contacted the small local dealer who I originally purchased the StudioLive from and he told me that he had stopped selling StudioLive mixers and purged himself of all product. He had similar complaints with their customer service. He had had his first StudioLive fail two hours after return from service. If you are contemplating purchasing Presonus equipment, I caution you to first do a good web search and read the service experiences of others. Decide how important service and reliability are to you before you spend your hard earned money. Don’t end up with a story like mine. – Happy tracking. Tim.
  10. This unique, spacious home has 3 rooms that are designed to play music in. A control room, and two performance rooms. Treatments include slat resonators and other acoustic treatments. A separate quiet heat pump cools and heats these rooms. The studio is wired with mogami cable. Special construction techniques were employed to minimize sound transmission. Here is a link with more pictures of the house.http://berkowib01.ctmls.mlxchange.com/5.7.07.31639/Tools/MultiImageViewer/MediaViewerDlg.asp?Mode=1&DefaultTab=0&Address=81\%20PETERSEN\%20RD&SysPropID=252634519&PageType=4&ShowImages=1&ShowLinks=1
  11. Hi there I am looking to buy one of these omni mic's Thanks
  12. I have both a dolphinhead original and a jerry jones neptune double cutaway not for sale but the original is problematic, dead spots and such. I would urge you to look at the Jerry Jones stuff it's really well done
  13. I am looking for a remote for the central station Thanks
  14. I would like to hear about forum members experience with group lessons. I started a group of 3 young students doing a half hour of classroom time focusing on technique, theory, time, and applying it to a song. the second half hour is spent in a studio with drums, bass and guitar. The students switch on and off each instrument. I think this can be more beneficial and is more fun than regular lessons.
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