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FretFiend.

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  1. Given all the variables of room acoustics, mic types and placement, recording equipment, and even playing style, not to mention your playback equipment, you can be pretty sure that YouTube videos will not necessarily faithfully reproduce the true sound of a guitar. No guitar maker, even Martin, produces guitars that are one hundred percent consistent. One particular Martin guitar might appeal to you and another practically identical one may not. Martin guitars come from the factory with only a minimal set-up done on them. Even used ones may or may not be set up to suit your playing style. That may affect a particular guitar's appeal to you. That said, there are lots of Martin solid spruce/rosewood dreadnoughts with 1 11/16 minimum nut widths out there. The good ones fall under the category of "standard series." That would start with the plain old D-28 and go upward in cost from that. I'm betting that a good D-28 would do you just fine... but... you gotta go play some personally, new or used, (more than one) and see. Sorry. No way around it.
  2. Just get the neck reset... this time by a competent luthier. Don't butcher a nice guitar.
  3. I sure am glad that after ten years, someone finally cleared that up.
  4. If you do a web search using the search words, "Yamaha FG110" you'll find all the reviews you want. Yamaha guitars are generally known to be, "bright," but that's not necessarily a bad thing. It won't sound like a D-28, but most people find their tone quite pleasant. The seventies vintage red label guitars have a bit of a legendary reputation. That FG110 could be a sweet guitar. They are, however, now over forty years old. Even a Yamaha can't last forever without some repair, such as a neck reset, and Yamaha's have a reputation for being difficult to repair. Still, if it's in playable condition, I'd take it over that Fender in a heartbeat!
  5. The zombies are gettin' pretty bad around here.
  6. So you couldn't get the battery compartment removed yourself, so you took it to the local guitar store. (to remove it for you, I guess) Sounds like they didn't have any problem removing it. It also sounds like you paid the guitar store for this service. So now, once more, you still can't get the battery compartment removed. Maybe you should take it back to your local guitar store... and this time, have them show you how to remove it. Oh, and G-tak, perhaps you are bit new around here to be critiquing others' responses.
  7. Google that model. It's not a seventies vintage Harmony guitar, it's a broken cheap PRC knockoff of a cheap seventies vintage Harmony guitar. It's not even firewood, it's landfill fodder.
  8. I had to look around to see what that is. D-18 Modern Deluxe. Nice! Excellent choice!
  9. If it's that sorry, it's probably fallen apart by now. The OP started this thread in 2008.
  10. Yep. Somebody somewhere is making money off of this crap, else they wouldn't be doing it.
  11. I suspect that he found one by now. He posted that back in 2011. <facepalm>
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