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Opposite Day

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Opposite Day last won the day on August 28

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About Opposite Day

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  1. Gotta give props to Christian rappers. Propitiation and substitutional atonement are not easy to rhyme!
  2. I've never considered key whatsoever. Maybe it might register subconsciously in some subtle way, but I've never seen any evidence of it. We were just putting a set list together the other day actually and trying to pick out all the categories we were going to sort by. Tempos obviously. Genre, because we're kinda all over the road there. I also consider energy to be distinct from tempo although I'd probably have a hard time describing it.
  3. That was completely off my radar, but with a little editing it would have made a great soundtrack for an '80s training montage.
  4. Really? It was ok, but I never thought that record lived up to their '70s stuff, most of it anyway. I was kind of a Steve Howe loyalist though. I do remember the issue of Guitar that was transcribed in.
  5. Oh, here's one! Very '80s! [video=youtube;Xqg82l8WniQ]
  6. Right down to the album cover painted by violent mental patients!
  7. Don't kill the whale, bro! Still take that over Big Generator any day.
  8. Ain't Nobody was '83, but yeah. In my mind there is the good 80s that includes Van Halen, hair bands up to and including Ratt, but not Poison, and of course it's the golden age of hip hop. And then the bad '80s, which include synth pop bands (special exemptions for Human League, Soft Cell, Kajagoogoo and Duran Duran), Van Hagar, Madonna, etc.. And there was something about the '80s that completely tainted all the '70s prog rock bands. It was really uncanny how bands like Yes and Rush seemed to be like, "hey we tried being good, let's try sucking now! I bet our Album sales will double!" which of course they did. Not just prog bands actually. Billy Joel went from tunes like "The Stranger" to "Uptown Girl." What the hell happened?
  9. Well as they say, you take what's good for your pleasin' I'll take what's good for the crazy evening.
  10. It's definitely no "You've Got the Love" or "Ain't Nobody."
  11. It took me years to figure that riff out exactly! He takes a Police/Eddie Brickell chord and pushes the top two notes up a half step turning it into major triad with the 3rd in the bass. Pretty slick! Of course you're right though, Eddie was the king.
  12. Hehe, I figured that would epitomize your eightiesphobia. Still has one of the best opening guitar riffs ever though on "Lay it Down."
  13. Heh, well now I'm used to a vox modeling amp which is much lighter. For a while I was using a half-stack, H&K Triamp. Looked great, sounded great. And I couldn't get it up to 1 without making everyone's ears bleed. That was my masochism phase. Many years ago, missing the pro, I bought a Fender Twin reissue hoping to recapture some of the pro's glory. The sound that came out of that thing was totally sterile and lifeless. No comparison. Probably the best sound I ever had at a gig was the pro and my friend's dad's silver face twin which I borrowed. I went in to an SGX 2000, one of those cheesy '80s multi-effects processors. It had stereo outs, one to the pro, one to the twin. Also we rented a smoke machine. It was glorious!! It's really a pet peeve of mine that a company will make a magnificent product like that that people love and then "reissue" under the same name a clearly inferior product. How hard is it really just to make the exact, same thing? Old fender amps, the original whammy pedal, griswold cast iron pans, etc. And of course used originals become obnoxiously expensive.
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