Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
brettryantalley

korg c-600 concert series digital piano? help!?

Recommended Posts

hey guys, I am in talks with a guy about getting a Korg C-600 "Concert Series Digital Piano." He has owned it about 2-3 and he bought it from a guy who owned it for 7...so its about ten years old. I cant find ANYTHING online about it, and the guy said he never could either. I've attatched a picture of it. I really need your guys' opinion on this one. I would have liked to get a nice portable keyboard, but this offer (under 200) might be too good to pass up. I attatched a picture so you guys can get a look at it. It has 76 semi-weighted keys, analog in and out, MIDI in and out...which is pretty much everything I'm looking for in a studio piano. sounds are piano, strings, organ, vibes and harpsicord (i think thats it).

 

The biggest problem would be portability. Im a guitar player, but if i ever start playing keys at gigs, and i get this one, i would have to end up buying a new keyboard cause it looks like this is connected and i wouldnt just be able to take the keyboard off the stand. and i dont want to get a new keyboard cause i'm too poor to do so. My budget was under 400 bucks, and this being a Korg Digital Piano for 200 is making me seriously think about going with it despite its seemingly horrid portability. But 90% of its use would be in studio and home practice...

 

so...what do you guys think? has anyone even heard of the c-600 or the concert digital series? how were korgs digitals ten years ago? any and all input is needed...thanks guys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Um, well, I think Korg's digital pianos TODAY are pretty weak.... :( Ten year old sounds on an instrument like that, um... I'm thinking they're either going to be bad, or so-bad-they're-good, in an unrealistic way.

 

Kiru

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i had one of those in approx 1993 and the sounds are very poor in comparison to todays stuff. The price is right though. I saw that one on ebay as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there,

 

I have a Korg C5000 piano that I got in 1989, paid $2600 for it! It was quite the rage back then but sounds fairly crummy now. I now just use it to play my Oberheim Mini Grand module with because it has great fully weighted keyboard action but I don't think the one you mention does. The C5000 is a tank though. It weighs about 90 pounds and I've never had an issue with it breaking, keys sticking, speakers etc... I've even luggde that monster to gigs which, looking back, was sort of stupid. It actually looks really nice though and I will probaly put it in a living room or something sometime once I get a P120.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally posted by brettryantalley

thanks guys...i guess im going to pass on it due to bad reputation of sounds and bad portability. so what would you reccomend for 400 or so?

I'd recommend saving your pennies for a few more months. :)

 

Kiru

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

how many more months? save up how much? and for which keyboards? my sounds that are most important to me is piano and strings. would it be best to go with a good controller and a midi module?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, well, here's some questions then. How many keys do you want? You want something portable, but the more keys you have, the less portable the instrument. It seems to me that you might look at 61-key (five octave) keyboards, as there are a great many of these out there, but if you're looking for piano sound and piano playability, you probably want at least 76 keys and some weight behind the key. Naturally, the more keys you have, the more money it costs. Then, there are fluke instruments like Studiologic's four-octave (49 keys) hammer-action controller, though I think this is probably not the right instrument for you, and is going to lead to higher costs than you want to incur.

 

How good do the sounds have to be? Are you looking for "photorealistic" piano sounds, or will "pretty good" do it for you? Generally, better sounds do mean higher prices, as well.

 

So, you want piano and string sounds, and I presume you mean fairly realistic, piano-based emulations of these? Let me throw a few suggestions out for you to consider.

 

Roland Juno-D: Despite the name, it's not an analog synth, it's a sample-based one, but it's small and comparatively inexpensive; you could probably get it for $500 if you shop around, haggle, or have a friend that works at a music store. You'll get a wide variety of sounds out of it, and while you won't be getting the most realistic piano available today, it won't be bad either, especially since you're thinking of gigging with it.... It's small, compact, and cheap. Downsides are that there are better piano sounds out there, and the keys are lightweight, unpianolike, and not as numerous as on a piano (61 vs 88)

 

(continued....)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yamaha P-60: This instrument is kind of the opposite of the Roland Juno-D. It has heavy, piano-like keys; cheap built-in speakers for practicing, and a piano sample that is higher-quality than the one in the Juno-D, though not the best one on the market. Unlike the Roland, it has only 10 sounds: Grand Piano 1, Grand Piano 2, E. Piano 1, E. Piano 2, Harpsichord 1, Harpsichord 2, Vibraphone, Church Organ 1, Church Organ 2, and Strings. IIRC the strings aren't that hot, but they'll be OK layered with the piano sound. You would get a wider variety of string sounds on the Juno-D, and they might be better. The P-60 isn't really a keyboard designed for gigging, though it wouldn't be horrible for that purpose, certainly. 36 lbs isn't horrible, but it doesn't have separate L/Mono and R output 1/4" jacks... it has a single headphone output that could be split and run to your soundboard or amp. The P-60 is a bit more expensive than the Juno-D, though again, with some haggling or through a friend, you could probably get this one around $600, maybe $650.

 

Casio Privia PX-100 or PX-300: I've tried the PX-100 and I wasn't too keen on it but your mileage may vary. They're $500 and $600 at Musician's Friend and you could probably get them cheaper. The action isn't too bad, actually, considering that they're Casio.

 

Any of a variety of Casio (WK-xxxx) or Yamaha (PSR-xxx or DGX-xxx) home keyboards: Not my first or second choice, but an option to consider. The DGX keyboards don't sound too bad at all, and they come in 76- and 88-key configurations, though they're not built or made for gigging, really. They come in a variety of prices and featuresets.

 

There are other options out there, but the question you have to ask yourself is which of these sounds like it suits your purpose. Then you can consider other options along these lines, including used keyboards.

 

Kiru

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Korg Digital and Stage Pianos are not that high quality, in my honest opinion. I was very dissapointed when I played on a few of them.

 

Part of the dissapointing experience is because Korg does not offer many of the Piano feature's that the P120 has (soundboard resonance, key off, sympathetic resonance layer, acoustic noises, etc). These features really add to the playing experience.

 

Some of the new Korgs feature half-pedaling, which is a plus. But until Korg updates their Acoustic Piano Playback technology, I will not recommend them.

 

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can recommend the 2 that I own.

 

A roland RD250s - very heavy and you need speakers but it's a very nice piano... actually made in the late 80's. Doesn't sound as realistic as the new ones but is more playable than most - very expressive and very good key to sound connection. Also the Electric Pianos on it are killer. The only pianos that play nicer in my opinion on the Yamaha p120 and Yamaha p250. Not bad for an 1987 piano. They usually go around 400-450 on ebay.

 

I also own a Yamaha P60 - which is a nice piano to start out on. I picked my up on ebay for 450.00. I couldn't pass up the price for something to stick in my office at work. Obviously the p60 is not a good as the p120 but if you are new to piano it might be the ticket... I see them go normally about 600-650 on ebay. It still better than most pianos or keyboard in that range.

 

If you can save up for the P120 that would be you best bet.

 

I also was fairly impressed with Korg sp300 - lot's of usable ep's - but for that money I would go with the p120.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...