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  • open cords

    I know that the lowest pitch on a standard tuned guitar is the open note (E) on the low E string.



    But what is the lowest pitch (basic) open chord?

  • #2
    HUh?
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    • #3
      Yeah, I know.



      I sit around and come up with these questions that I can't answer, so I thought I would ask.



      If I was singing, and was only using basic open cords, what would be the lowest pitched "open chord"?



      Would I be in the key of E? Therefore F # would be a major second. Or would I be in C? Where E would be a major third?



      Make sense? What is the lowest pitch open chord?

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      • #4
        I would say E since that is the lowest tuned open string. However, you could drop D or drop C and work out a lower open chord.



        Edit: You can always invert other chords that have an E in them...

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        • #5
          A chord doesn't have "a" pitch, if there's only one pitch then you're playing unison, not a chord.



          For Em7 you have to fret the 5th string at the 2nd fret and you can leave the other strings open.

          I think that if you want to use the lowest notes available on each string to play a simple chord ( i assume simple means X, Xm, X7, Xm7, Xmaj7) then that is the chord to play.

          If you want to play any simple chord with the lowest note available (open 6th string) then E is the major 3rd of C, the minor 3rd of C#, the 5th of A, the minor 7th of F# and the major 7th of F.



          E is not necessarily lower or higher than any other note. If you're not near the limits of the frequency range that is audible to the human ear than each E (for example) will have a D that is lower and a D that is higher (for example) than it.
          I used to be "with it", then they changed what "it" was.
          Now, what I'm with isn't "it", and what's "it" seems weird and scary to me.
          (Abe Simpson)

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          • #6
            That's kind of what I was thinking, but I was confusing myself every time I tried to think it out.



            Thanks.

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            • #7
              Ok open E is the lowest open chord because E is the root. If you played an open C chord and strummed the low E as well, you might be able to consider the C as a lower chord because the root would have to be a third below the E. An A chord played in the same manner would be even lower. So on and so forth. This is hype mostly. I'm sure Jon or Jed could clear or dispel that.
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              • #8






                Quote Originally Posted by 1001gear
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                open E is the lowest open chord...you might be able to consider the C as a lower chord...An A chord played in the same manner would be even lower.










                Quote Originally Posted by The Burninator
                View Post

                A chord doesn't have "a" pitch, if there's only one pitch then you're playing unison, not a chord...If you're not near the limits of the frequency range that is audible to the human ear than each E (for example) will have a D that is lower and a D that is higher (for example) than it.




                ...
                I used to be "with it", then they changed what "it" was.
                Now, what I'm with isn't "it", and what's "it" seems weird and scary to me.
                (Abe Simpson)

                Comment


                • #9






                  Quote Originally Posted by The Burninator
                  View Post







                  Quote Originally Posted by 1001gear


                  open E is the lowest open chord...you might be able to consider the C as a lower chord...An A chord played in the same manner would be even lower.












                  Quote Originally Posted by Burninator


                  A chord doesn't have "a" pitch, if there's only one pitch then you're playing unison, not a chord...If you're not near the limits of the frequency range that is audible to the human ear than each E (for example) will have a D that is lower and a D that is higher (for example) than it.








                  ...




                  Not quite.You're referring to some obscure harmonics and I'm referrring to chord inversions. See it's just a technicality where an A chord could contain the low E but also the A root below. Theoretical nonsense but closer to what the OP was getting at.
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                  • #10
                    I did not fully understand your posts.

                    How do you decide if a chord is lower or higher than another?

                    Let's take the C and E chords for example - if you strum all six strings then the two chords span across the same range - E2 to E4, so which one is lower and which one is higher?
                    I used to be "with it", then they changed what "it" was.
                    Now, what I'm with isn't "it", and what's "it" seems weird and scary to me.
                    (Abe Simpson)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It's hypothetical. Presuming root position, the 'guitarist' answer to the question would be open E. The A/E ( my example ) is in second inversion and with the A string sounding, you'd hear THAT as the tonality and the open E triad would tend to sound lower - at least to the musically brainwashed. The C/E (first inversion) could also be considered lower. I just postulated (I'm getting funny there) that if we fudge and assume a triadic root, the C and the A triads could be considered lower than open E. Theory is that way except it should be less delusional and make a _little_ sense.
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                      • #12
                        The bass E string on a guitars plays E2 (about 82 Hz).

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                        • #13
                          For the life if me, I can't figure out what time2kill means by "lowest pitch (basic) open chord".

                          The question itself means nothing to me. Chords don't have pitch. Voicings are another matter.

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                          • #14
                            Can you answer these questions for me?



                            -What specifically is your definition of "Open Chord"?



                            -When you say "lowest pitch", does that mean the root of the chord?



                            -Why do you ask? What piece of information are you looking for?
                            Thinking too much produces exactly the opposite of the intended outcome.

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                            • #15
                              I didn't realize it when I made the post, but after reading the replies, I can see its not part of music theory.



                              I was thinking about "open chords" from a beginner's point of view. You know, the first chords we all learned? The C chord, the E chord, the A chord, etc.



                              Say for instance, I was going to play a simple 3 chord song around the campfire. Perhaps I know a few of them that start on different chords.



                              Now let's say I was going to try to sing along with them. But with an untrained voice (and ear I guess), I can't sing high notes. Which chord would I want to start with?



                              I guess I am talking about the key and not the pitch.



                              As was mentioned, the keys kind of go around in a circle. (there is a D lower than C and a D higher than C.



                              The more I write, the more I seen to confuse myself.



                              If I'm playing an A barre chord on the fifth fret, it is easy for me to see that the G barre chord on the 3rd fret is two half-steps lower. Following that logic, it would seem that open E chord is the lowest (tone?).



                              Does that mean that the open G chord is two and a half steps lower than the open A chord? And if it does, than what is the lowest open chord?



                              Or is this another one of those things that I should stop spending time worrying about? (like that time when I couldn't figure out why there is only a half step between the B and C note (E and F)?

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