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1937 Hammond NovaChord

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  • 1937 Hammond NovaChord

    Pretty neat.

    www.discretesynthesizers.com/Nova/intro.htm

  • #2
    Very cool!
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    Former product development engineer: Genz Benz, a KMC Music/FMIC/JAM Industries Company, continuing factory level product support and service for Genz Benz

    Currently product development engineer: Mesa Boogie

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    • #3
      What an incredible amount of work....but a very nice end finished piece.
      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Full-Steam/179028619290

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      • #4
        WOW I am completely blown away. Thats a lot of work. Great job
        I'll live in a carboard box before I give up my guitar!!

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        • #5
          Talk about a labor of love- But, nothing sounds like a Hammond!
          (Proud owner of a 1950's C2)
          I'm backed by the shack of a soul boss most turnin' stormin' sound o'soul

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          • #6
            I owned an M3 for a while. I used to service the B's and C's
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            Former product development engineer: Genz Benz, a KMC Music/FMIC/JAM Industries Company, continuing factory level product support and service for Genz Benz

            Currently product development engineer: Mesa Boogie

            Comment


            • #7
              I remember my first "decent" band had a "stripped down" B3 - and it still weighed 400 pounds or so (or it seemed like it!) It took all four of us to lift it in and out of the truck.

              A few years later he traded it in on an M3.
              I'm keeping in mind that that another term for scoring a lug song to sheet music is "staff infection".............
              the artist formerly known as DRF

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              • #8
                Yeah, the B's were hardly "portable" except the solid state "Porta-B"
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                Former product development engineer: Genz Benz, a KMC Music/FMIC/JAM Industries Company, continuing factory level product support and service for Genz Benz

                Currently product development engineer: Mesa Boogie

                Comment


                • #9
                  Porta-B is tube, not solid-state. Happy owner of one since 1981.
                  this sig no verb

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by The Real MC
                    Porta-B is tube, not solid-state. Happy owner of one since 1981.

                    It's been a very long time since I've seen/played one but if I recall correctly, it was like a chopped M-3 (maybe a slightly shorter keuyboard(s)) and I thought it was made in the late 60's and very early 70's. I don't remember if it was all tube or solid state but it may have been a hybrid. It was kind of their last attempt at survival as the organ market was just getting a glimse at the digital possibilities of the future, which is why Suzuki was ultimately interetsted in them and then bought them in the middle-late 70's (?).

                    A vey cool tone-wheel piece that was pretty successful considering the times.

                    Roland then came out with the VK-1 (?) which was one of the first successful attemts to recreate the tonewheel sound digitally.

                    I think a friend of mine still has a few various B's and C's in his shop.
                    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Former product development engineer: Genz Benz, a KMC Music/FMIC/JAM Industries Company, continuing factory level product support and service for Genz Benz

                    Currently product development engineer: Mesa Boogie

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The Chopped B3s where smaller but you didn't really make them much lighter- it was the tonewheels not the legs that made 'em heavy-
                      I just about lost a friend carrying my C2 down the basements steps- I'm pretty sure it's the heaviest thing he or I ever lifted.
                      I'm backed by the shack of a soul boss most turnin' stormin' sound o'soul

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by agedhorse

                        It's been a very long time since I've seen/played one but if I recall correctly, it was like a chopped M-3 (maybe a slightly shorter keuyboard(s)) and I thought it was made in the late 60's and very early 70's. I don't remember if it was all tube or solid state but it may have been a hybrid. It was kind of their last attempt at survival as the organ market was just getting a glimse at the digital possibilities of the future, which is why Suzuki was ultimately interetsted in them and then bought them in the middle-late 70's (?).

                        A vey cool tone-wheel piece that was pretty successful considering the times.


                        Chopped up L-100 actually. The sole transistor is used in the percussion keying circuit. Big omission is lack of scanner vibrato, Porta-B/L-100 was electronic phase shift circuit. But Porta-B had all 91 tonewheels wired in, the only spinet done like this. Mine just happens to sound really good, it screams for R&B and Rawk. Very cool tonewheel organ as long as you're not playing jazz on it.

                        The tonewheels aren't the only heavy item in a chopped B-3. Those manuals are heavy too, over 100 lbs. And unless you're using a dense multipin for the 91+ wires between the TG and the manuals, you have to have both the TG and manuals in the same case.
                        this sig no verb

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                        • #13
                          Shows you how foggy my memory is. I do however remember clearly how heavy all of the product was. Gut un-zipping at best.
                          -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Former product development engineer: Genz Benz, a KMC Music/FMIC/JAM Industries Company, continuing factory level product support and service for Genz Benz

                          Currently product development engineer: Mesa Boogie

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by The Real MC
                            Big omission is lack of scanner vibrato, Porta-B/L-100 was electronic phase shift circuit.

                            Well, yeah - the vibrato scanner was another few pounds of gears and such.


                            But Porta-B had all 91 tonewheels wired in, the only spinet done like this. Mine just happens to sound really good, it screams for R&B and Rawk. Very cool tonewheel organ as long as you're not playing jazz on it.


                            There are some interesting stories in the various tonewheel schemes used in different models. One of my prized old obscure binders is full of Hammond service manuals, and they did all sorts of interesting things. They even had some "complex" tonewheels with non-sinewave patterns for the bass pedals. And the RT-3 had a monophonic synth for the "pedal solo" unit.
                            "I would kill the children of a thousand planets, just to see you smile"

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